BSS Coures
FIRST YEAR 1st SEMESTER BSS (HONORS)
COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 101: INTRODUCING ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed with a brief introduction to what anthropology is about. In this regard, the major areas of anthropology will be introduced. What makes anthropology the most comprehensive discipline among those which study human beings, what integrates the diversified sub-fields under the umbrella of ‘anthropology’, what makes anthropology the most ‘humanistic’ science – will be taught in this course.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the meaning and orientations of anthropology;
  • Understand the major areas and sub fields;
  • Examine the perspectives, techniques, history, and applications about the discipline.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: What is Anthropology?
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts and features of anthropology;
  • identify the scientific vs. humanistic orientations of anthropology;
  • analyze the meaning of anthropology.
  • Meaning of anthropology
  • Features of anthropology

Orientations (scientific vs. humanistic) of anthropology

4 hrs
Unit-2: What Do Anthropologists Do?
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain various concerns that anthropologists are occupied with;
  • identify major fields and subfields of anthropology;
  • analyze the integration of different fields and subfields.
  • Various anthropological concerns
  • Major fields and subfields

Integration of different fields and subfields

6 hrs
Unit-3: How Do Anthropologists Do What They Do?
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explainfieldwork, cross-cultural comparison, and case study used by anthropologist;
  • identify the processes of excavation and linguistic survey;
  • analyze different kinds of short-term participatory research procedures.
  • Fieldwork, cross-cultural comparison, and case study (things that are common to all major branches)
  • Excavation(required for biological and archaeological anthropology), linguistic survey (for linguistic anthropology)
  • Short-term participatory research of several kinds and focused ethnographic survey (for applied anthropology)
6 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: Perspectives of Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explainthe holistic approach of anthropology;
  • identifyrelativistic, emic, etic, and comparative perspectives in anthropology;
  • analyzethe relationship between anthropology and colonialism.
  • A holistic approach of anthropology
  • Relativistic, combination of emic and etic, and comparative.
  • Anthropology and colonialism
4 hrs
Unit-5: A Short History of Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the short history of anthropology at different times;
  • identify the differences and major shifts in perspectives during different times;

analyze the correlation between the perspectives of different times.

A short history of anthropology before 1850, 1851 to 1900, 1901 to 1950, 1951 to 2000, 2000 and onward 4 hrs
Unit-6: Why Should We Study Anthropology?
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the importance of the anthropological study;
  • identify the processes of application of anthropological knowledge to bring change for human;
  • analyze the pattern of these changes and their connection with anthropological knowledge.
  • Application of anthropological knowledge for bringing in desirable changes for humans
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT
Ember, Carol R., and Melvin Ember
1988 Anthropology. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.
Eriksen, Thomas Hylland, and FinnSivert Nielsen
2001 A History of Anthropology. London: Pluto Press.
Erikson, Thomas Hylland
2004 What is Anthropology? London: Pluto Press.
Kottak, Cornard Phillip

2012Anthropology. New York: McGraw Hill.
Pink, Sarah, ed.

2005Applications of Anthropology: Professional Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books.
Service, Elman
1985 Cultural Anthropology vs Social Anthropology. InA Century of Controversy: Ethnological Issues from 1860 to 1960. Orlando: Academic Press, Inc.

আহমেদ, রেহনুমা, ও মানস চৌধুরী
২০০৬ নৃবিজ্ঞানের প্রথম পাঠ । ঢাকা: একুশে প্রকাশনী লিমিটেড।

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Angelone, Elvio, ed.
2000/2001 Annual Editions: Anthropology. Sluice Dock, CT: Dushkin/McGraw-Hill.
Podolefsky, Aaron, and Peter J. Brown
1989 Applying Anthropology: An Introductory Reader. California, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company.
Rauch, Margaret, and Robert H. Lavenda
1998A Study Guide to Accompany Anthropology: A Perspective on Human Condition. California, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company.
Scupin, Raymond, and Christopher R. Delouree
2015 Anthropology: A Global Perspective. New York: Pearson Education.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 102: BANGLADESH CULTURE AND SOCIETY
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course has been designed to orient students to their own culture and society from an anthropological and ethnohistorical perspective. Thus, they would be able to relate their learning from other ‘core’ courses to their society.
COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the context of the prehistoric, ancient, medieval, colonial and Pakistan period Bangladesh focusing on the major socio-cultural events;
  • understand and explain the background to the emergence of Bangladesh as an independent nation;
  • understand the major aspects of economic, social, political, cultural, belief systems, family, marriage and kinship, national issues and policies, global connections, and ethnicity of Bangladesh.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introducing Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the population, landscape, and economic aspects of Bangladesh;
  • identify major activities of GO, NGO, and donor agencies in Bangladesh;
  • analyze and evaluate the role of various institutions in Bangladesh.
  • Population and landscape
  • Agriculture, industry, and service sector
  • Physical infrastructure, investment, and foreign trade
  • Role of government and non-governmental organizations in socio-economic development
  • Activities of the donor agencies, multi-nationals, and UN organizations
6 hrs
Unit-2: ‘Bengal’ in Prehistoric and Ancient Times
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history of Bengal in prehistoric and ancient times;
  • identify major aspects of economic, social, and political activities during prehistoric and ancient times;
  • analyze the trends of ‘Bengal’ of prehistoric and ancient times.
  • Geographical locations and boundaries; invaders and settlers
  • Ethnic and linguistic background of Bengal
  • Agriculture, cottage industry, trade and commerce with the outer world
  • Bengal as a free political unit during the reigns of Shakanka and Paldynasty
  • Revenue and land tenure system; the prevalence of Hinduism; spread of Buddhism
6 hrs
Unit-3: ‘Bengal’ in the Medieval Period
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history of Bengal in the medieval period;
  • identify major aspects of religious activities and rulers of that time;

analyze the trends of ‘Bengal’ of the medieval period focusing on language, ethnicity, religion, revenue system, and rulers’ activities.

  • Origin and development of Bangla language
  • Ethnic formation of the Bangalees
  • Islamization of the peoples of Bengal
  • Religious syncretism and Sufism in Bengal: saints and preachers
  • Free kings and rulers in Bengal during the ‘Muslim’ period in India
  • Revenue and land tenure system
  • Trade, commerce, and urban centers
  • Rise and fall of Nawabs in Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa
8 hrs
Unit-4: ‘Bengal’ Under the ‘British’ Rule
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the rule of the British in Bengal;
  • identify the sectors of social reformation influenced by British rule;
  • analyze and critically evaluate the impact of British rule in Bengal.
  • The rule of East India Company in Bengal- the destruction of trade and industry, changes in the land tenure system, reactions against the “company” rule, the introduction of English language both as an official language and as a medium of instruction
  • Four Great Famines
  • The Queen’s direct rule in Bengal- the spread of English education and recruitment in civil service, creation of Bengali middle class
  • The role of social reformers like Ram Mohan Roy, Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar, Devendranath Tagore and the like, development of Bengali literature, music, theatre, and arts; movements against the British rule in Bengal
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: The Background of Bengali Nationalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history and consequences of Partition in 1947;
  • identify major socio-economic disparity under the rule of West Pakistan;
  • analyze the contexts of the rise of Bengali Nationalism and Independence of Bangladesh.
  • Partition of Bengal in 1947 and its identity as ‘East Pakistan’
  • Socio-economic disparity under the rule of West Pakistan
  • The reaction against the rule of the “Panjabi’s”: language movement, 6 and 11 points movements, the great mass upsurge in the 1969, declaration of independence, and the birth of Bangladesh
8 hrs
Unit-6: Bangladesh as a Moderate Muslim Country
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the functions of religious diversity in a moderate Muslim country like Bangladesh;
  • identify root causes to the development of Bangladesh as a moderate Muslim state;
  • analyze the role of religion, political institutions, and different policies in shaping the state.
  • Varieties in religious traditions
  • Government, politics, and political institutions
  • Condition of Human Rights
  • Co-existence of several kinds of education systems
  • Domestic and foreign policies
4 hrs
Unit-7: Economy of Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the economic situation of Bangladesh;
  • identify the patterns of economic practices in Bangladesh;
  • analyze the socio-economic conditions of Bangladesh.
  • Nature of Bangladesh economy
  • Trends and problems of industrialization
  • Pace of urbanization
  • Corruption, foreign aid, and trade
  • Economic inequality and vulnerability
  • Globalization of socio-economic relations
4 hrs
Unit-8: Kinship and social organizations
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the pattern of kinship in Bangladesh;
  • identify different types of family, marriage system and ceremonies of Bangladesh;
  • analyze the role of social inequality and the pattern of domestic violence in Bangladesh.
  • Role of kinship in rural and urban societies
  • Marriage systems and marriage ceremonies, mohrana and dowry as marriage transactions, bride killing, and dowry
  • Types and functions of the family
  • Status inequality within the family
  • Domestic violence
8 hrs
Unit-9: Ethnic Relations in Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain various ethnic groups and cultural diversity of Bangladesh;
  • identify root causes to the processes of marginalization in Bangladesh;
  • analyze ethnic relations in the hegemony of Bengali Muslims.
  • Various ethnic groups and cultural diversity
  • The marginalization of ethnic minorities
  • The hegemony of the Bengali Muslims
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Class Lecture, Multimedia presentation, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, Screening movie or documentary, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Islam, Sirajul, ed.
2007 History of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
Khan, Akbar Ali
1996 Discovery of Bangladesh. Dhaka: University Press Limited.
Lewis, David
2011 Bangladesh: Politics, Economy and Civil Society. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Schendel, Willem Van
2009 History of Bangladesh. New Delhi: Cambridge University Press.
Uddin, Nasir, ed.
2012The Politics of Peace: A Case of the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Institute of Culture and Development Research.
Umar, Badruddin
2004 The Emergence of Bangladesh: Class Struggles in East Pakistan (1947-1958). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Umar, Badruddin
2004 The Emergence of Bangladesh: Rise of Bengali Nationalism (1958–1971). Oxford: Oxford University Press
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Ahmed, Rahnuma, and Milu Shamsun Naher
1987Brides and the Demand System in Bangladesh: A Study. Dhaka: Centre for Social Studies.
Ali, Ahsan, and Hasan Shafie
2005Entitlement and Deprivation: Selected Cases of Discrimination in Bangladesh. Dhaka: UNESCO.
Arefeen, Helaluddin Khan Samsul
1996Changing Agrarian Structure in Bangladesh: Shimulia, A Study of Peri-Urban Village. Dhaka: Centre for Social Studies.
Arens, Jenneke, and Jos Van Beurden
1980 Jhagrapur: Poor Peasants and Women in a Village in Bangladesh. New Delhi: Orient Longman.
Aziz, K. M.Ashraful
1979 Kinship in Bangladesh. Dhaka: International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research: Bangladesh.
Aziz, K. M. Ashraful, and Clarence Maloney
1985 Life Stages, Gender and Fertility in Bangladesh. Dhaka: International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh
BBS
2011 Population and Housing Census. Dhaka: Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.
Chowdhury, Anwarullah
1978 A Bangladesh Village: A Study of Social Stratification. Dhaka: Centre for Social Studies.
Dannecker, Petra
2002 Between Conformity and Resistance: Women Garment Workers in Bangladesh. Dhaka: University Press Limited.
Gain, Philip
1998 Bangladesh Land Forest and Forest People. Dhaka: Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD).
Gain, Philip, ed.
2000 The Chittagong Hill Tracts: Life and Nature at Risk. Dhaka: Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD).
Gain, Philip, ed.
2008 Culture of Adivasis in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD).
Gardner, Katy
1995Global Migrants Local Lives: Travel and Transformation in Rural Bangladesh. Oxford: The Clarendon Press.
Islam, A. K. M. Aminul
1974A Bangladesh Village: Conflict and Cohesion. Cambridge, Massachussets: Schenkman Publishing Company.
Islam, Sirajul, ed.
2006 Banglapedia: The National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
Jahangir, Borhan uddin Khan
1981 Rural Society, Power Structure and Class Practice. Dhaka: Centre for Social Studies.
Jahangir, Borhan uddin Khan
1979 Differentiation, Polarization and Confrontation in Rural Bangladesh. Dhaka: Centre for Social Studies.
Karim, A. H. M. Zehadul
1990 The Pattern of Rural Leadership in an Agrarian Society: A Case Study of the Changing Power Structure in Bangladesh. New Delhi: Northern Book Centre.
Karim, Nazmul
1976 Changing Society in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Dhaka: Nawraz Publication.
Karim, Nehal
2004 The Emergence of Nationalism in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Odhuna.
Majumder, Ramesh Chandra
1971 History of Ancient Bengal. Calcutta: G. Bharadwaj.
Meloney, Clarence, with K.M. Ashraful Aziz and Profulla C. Sarker
1981 Beliefs and Fertility in Bangladesh. Dhaka: International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research.
Ray, Nihar Ranjan
1951 BangalirItihas-AdiParva. Calcutta: Book Emporium.
Tharoot, Shashi
2016 An Era of Darkness: The British Empire in India. New Delhi: Aleph Book Company
White, Sarah C.
1992Arguing with the Crocodile: Gender and Class in Bangladesh. Dhaka: University Press Limited.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 103: AN INTRODUCTION TO QUALITATIVE METHOD

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to make students familiar with some of the basic concepts and techniques of collecting, recording, and analyzing data following the qualitative approaches to research.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the qualitative approach and tradition in anthropology;
  • Understand the major concepts of qualitative research;
  • Understand different methods and techniques for collecting qualitative data;
  • Understand the techniques of recording and analyzing qualitative data.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: The Qualitative Approach in Social Research
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the qualitative research approach in anthropology;
  • identify major features of qualitative research;
  • analyze and evaluate the tradition of qualitative research in anthropology.
  • Characteristics of qualitative research
  • Qualitative research tradition in anthropology
6 hrs
Unit-2: Basic Concepts of Qualitative Research
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain basic concepts of qualitative research;
  • identify major features of the basic concepts of qualitative research;
  • analyze and correlate theory with data, concept, and variable.
  • Data
  • Concept
  • Variable
  • Qualitative measurement
  • Unit of analysis
  • Validity and reliability
  • Theory
Unit-3: Techniques of Data Collection-I
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the techniques of data collection in qualitative research;
  • identify major features of the techniques of data collection;
  • analyze the data collection techniques with importance.
  • Fieldwork
  • Case study
  • Unstructured interview and key informant interview
  • Participant observation
  • Collection of life history and narratives
  • Oral history
  • Observation
  • Focused ethnographic survey (FES)
  • Focused group discussion (FGD)
  • Archival research
8 hrs
Unit-4: Techniques of Ethno-science (Data Collection Technique-II)
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the techniques of ethnoscience;
  • identify major aspects of the techniques of ethnoscience;
  • analyze the strength and weaknesses of different techniques of ethnoscience.
  • Interviewing about cultural domains
  • Free-listing
  • The true/false and sentence frame techniques
  • Triad test
  • Pile sorting
  • Ranking and paired comparisons
6 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Learning to Interview
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the techniques of conducting the interview;
  • identify major aspects of the interview process;
  • analyze the importance of language in the interview.
  • The importance of language
  • Pacing the study
  • Presentation of self
6 hrs
Unit-6: Probing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the techniques of probing;
  • identify major aspects of probing;
  • analyze the probing in anthropological research.
  • Techniques of probing- silent probe, echo probe, uh-huh prob
  • Tell me more probe
  • Long question probe
  • Probing by leading
  • Baiting: phased-assertion probe
Unit-7: Effects of Interviewing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the effects of interviewing;
  • identify major aspects of the effects of interviewing;
  • analyze the importance of the effects of interviewing in anthropological research.
  • Response effect
  • Deference effect
  • Social desirability effect
  • The third-party present effect
  • Threatening questions
Unit-8: Recording Field Data
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the procedures of recording field data;
  • identify major aspects of recording field data;
  • analyze the importance of recording techniques in anthropological research.
  • Using a voice recorder/other recording equipment
  • Transcribing and VR software
  • note taking- jotting
  • The log
  • The dairy and detail note (descriptive, methodological, and analytic)
  • Using video
6 hrs
Unit-9: Analysing Qualitative Data
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the procedures of analyzing qualitative data;
  • identify major aspects of using quotes, matrices, and flow charts;
  • analyze the importance of quotes, matrices, visual presentation, and flow charts in anthropological research.
  • Use of quotes
  • Data matrices
  • Production of the visual display- presenting results in matrices and tables
  • Causal flow charts
6 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Class Lecture, Multimedia presentation, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Bernard, Harvey Russell

2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.

Hobbs, Dick, and Richard Wright, eds.

2006 The Sage Handbook of Fieldwork. London: Sage Publications, Inc.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Denzin, Norman K., and Yvonna S. Lincoln, eds.

2000 Handbook of Qualitative Research. London: Sage Publications, Inc.

Ember, Carol R., and Melvin Ember

2001 Cross-Cultural Research Methods. Lanham: Altamira Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 104: SOCIAL THOUGHT AND HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to offer an intellectual background of the origin of anthropology as an academic discipline. It also aims to track down the thoughts and events that made the major theoretical developments in anthropology possible. Anthropology, after all, is a western enterprise developed in the west by western thinkers, theorists, and peoples. It is, therefore, incumbent on us to learn those contexts, events, thoughts, and practices that shaped the discipline of anthropology.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand a brief history of Europe;
  • Understand social thoughts of modern European thinkers and philosophers;
  • Understand ancient thoughts since the Renaissance;
  • Examine western mode of thought since the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome to the present moment of Globalization;
  • Interpret major socio-cultural events of modern Europe such as the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment among others;

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Shifts in Western Epistemology accompanied by major social events from Ancient time to the period of Enlightenment
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the shifts in Western epistemology;
  • identify major social events from ancient time to the period of enlightenment;
  • analyze the scientific revolution of the Renaissance period and the Western mode of thought.
  • From the ancient Greek thinkers to those of the Renaissance—the Greek views, the world views of Saint Augustine, the doctrine of Thomistic Christianity, and the Renaissance outlook
  • The protest against Catholicism
  • Expansion of European boundary over the whole world and its impact on the European thought and life
  • The scientific revolution in the 17th century
  • Age of reason in the 18th century and its impact on the western civilization – critiques of enlightenment
Unit-2: Impact of the Thoughts of Enlightenment on the ‘Great Revolutions’ of the History
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the great revolutions of Enlightenment;
  • identify salient features of French, Industrial and Russian revolutions;
  • analyze the impact of thoughts of enlightenment on various revolutions.
  • Independence of America
  • French Revolution
  • Industrial Revolution
  • Russian Revolution
6 hrs
Unit-3: Thought and Culture in the Early Nineteenth Century
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine major thoughts and culture of the Early Nineteenth-century historical period;
  • identify basic issues of romanticism, German idealism, conservativism, liberalism, radicalism, early socialism, and nationalism;
  • analyze the trends of nineteenth-century thoughts and culture.
  • Romanticism
  • German Idealism
  • Conservatism
  • Liberalism
  • Radicalism
  • Early Socialism
  • Nationalism
8 hrs
Unit-4: Thought and Culture in the Mid-Nineteenth Century
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine major thoughts and culture of the Mid-Nineteenth Century historical period;
  • identify salient features of realism, naturalism, positivism, Darwinism, Marxism, anarchism, and liberalism;
  • analyze the trends of mid-nineteenth century thoughts and culture.
  • Realism and Naturalism
  • Positivism
  • Darwinism and Social Darwinism
  • Marxism
  • Anarchism and Liberalism in transition
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: The Surge of Nationalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the surge of nationalism;
  • identify major aspects of nationalism;
  • analyze the concept of nationalism and its debates.
  • Surge of Nationalism
4 hrs
Unit-6: World War I & II
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the contexts to World War I & II and the role of anthropology in this era;
  • identify root causes for World War I & II;
  • analyze the anthropological perspectives in the era of World War I & II.
  • Anthropology in the era of World War I & II
  • Anthropology between the 2 World Wars
4 hrs
Unit-7: Thought and Culture in an Era of World Wars
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the thoughts and culture during World Wars;
  • identify major areas of interest of these thoughts;
  • analyze post-war pessimism, communism, and existentialism from anthropological perspectives.
  • Post-war Pessimism
  • Communism
  • Existentialism
4 hrs
Unit-8: Decolonization and Worldwide Westernization/ Modernization
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the processes of decolonization;
  • identify salient features of decolonization and westernization or modernization;
  • analyze decolonization and worldwide westernization from anthropological perspectives.
  • Decolonization
  • Worldwide Westernization/ Modernization
Unit-9: Socialist Expansion and the Development of Cold War
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the socialist expansion in Europe;
  • identify the reasons behind the Cold War;
  • analyze socialist expansion and the development of the Cold War from anthropological critiques.
  • Socialist Expansion
  • The Development of the Cold War
4 hrs
Unit-10: The Age of Globalization
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the processes to the development of globalism;
  • identify the main features of globalization;
  • analyze the position of globalization in the context of the social thoughts of Europe.
  • The Age of Globalization
4 hrs
 
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Eriksen, Thomas Hylland, and Finn S. Nielsen

2001 A History of Anthropology. London: Pluto Press.

Perry, Marvin

1992 Western Civilization: Ideas, Politics and Society from 1400. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Erickson, Paul A., and Liam D. Murphy

2003 A History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Wax, Dustin M., ed.

2008 Anthropology at the Dawn of Cold War. London: Pluto Press.

Goody, Jack

2006 The Theft of History: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 105: COMPUTER LITERACY & APPLICATIONS

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed with basic training on the functions and programs of the computer for academic purposes.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand basic concepts of computer literacy and applications;
  • Understand the fundamental issues of computer literacy and applications.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction to Computers
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the basic organization of the computer;
  • identify different types of computers;
  • analyze the history and generations of computers.
  • Introduction and basic organization of computer
  • Types of computers
  • History and generations of computers
2 hrs
Unit-2: Number Systems, Code, and Logic Functions
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the number system of computer and conversion of numbers;
  • identify different types of data and codes;
  • analyze the logic functions of the computer.
  • Number systems of computer
  • Conversion of numbers
  • Data and codes
  • Logic functions
4 hrs
Unit-3: Input-Output Devices and Memory Organization
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine input-output devices and memory organization of computer;
  • identify different devices and memories of computer;
  • analyze the functions of input-output, other peripheral devices, and memory organization of the computer.
  • Input and output devices of computer
  • Other peripheral devices of computer
  • Main memory
  • Secondary memory
4 hrs
Unit-4: Practical: Word Processing and PowerPoint
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine word processing and PowerPoint presentation;
  • identify basic features of word processing and PowerPoint presentation;
  • analyze the procedures followed to prepare word document and designing PowerPoint slides.
  • Introduction and different word processing
  • Creating a document
  • Editing commands
  • Formatting
  • Introduction on PowerPoint window
  • A slide presentation and design
4 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Computer Software and Operating Systems
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the functions of computer software and operating systems;
  • identify different computer software and operating systems;
  • analyze the application of different computer software and operating systems.
  • Introduction and classification of computer software
  • System software
  • Application package programs
  • Functions and types of operating system
  • Windows and Unix operating systems
4 hrs
Unit-6: Networks and Internet
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine different computer networks;
  • identify the basic features of networks and the internet;
  • analyze the use of the internet for networking.
  • Introduction to computer networks (LAN, MAN & WAN)
  • Introduction to the internet and extranet
  • Internet explorer
  • Outlook express
  • E-mail management
2 hrs
Unit-7: Information Technology and Communication
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the knowledge about IT concepts;
  • identify major aspects of IT and communication;
  • analyze the functions and applications of IT, communication, and e-commerce
  • IT concepts and application Multimedia basics
  • Electronic commerce and telecommunication
4 hrs
Unit-8: Practical: Spreadsheet Analysis (Excel)
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine different tasks on spreadsheets;
  • identify basic functions of a spreadsheet, SPSS, internet browsing, and editing techniques;
  • analyze basic knowledge on a spreadsheet, SPSS, and internet browsing.
  • Introduction and fundamentals of spreadsheet
  • Creating worksheet
  • Editing techniques
  • Introduction to chart wizard
  • Creating and modifying charts, formulas, and functions
  • SPSS
  • Internet Browsing
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Practical in the computer lab, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

READING LIST

REQUIRED TEXT

Peter, Norton

2006 Introduction to Computers. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Rahman, Eng. Mujibur

Computer in Business.

Rahman, M. Lutfar, and M. Alamgir Hossain

2002Computer Fundamentals. Dhaka: Systech Publications.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Paul, W. Mursil, and Crecill L. Smith

Introduction to Computer Science.

Androw S. Tanenbaun

2003 Computer Network. New Jersey: Prentice Hall PTR.

Sarker,Md. Abdul Mannan

1996 Computer Anatomy. Dhaka: NTRAMS.

Norusis, MarijaJ.

1993 SPSS for Windows Base System User’s Guide: Release 6.0. Chicago: SPSS, In

Rahman, M. L.

Modern Science of Computer.

Hossain, Mokter

2005 Computer Education. Dhaka: Nabajug Publications.