BSS Coures

5.2 FIRST YEAR 2ND SEMESTER BSS (HONORS)

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 151: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course introduces the basic ideas and concepts of social and cultural anthropology.  It will also highlight various aspects of culture with ethnographic examples.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the cross-cultural perspectives on social, political, economic, and belief systems of the society;
  • Understand issues of social inequality, colonialism and neo-colonialism, and the modern world system.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Culture
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different perspectives of culture;
  • identify basic characteristics of culture;
  • analyze culture from anthropological perspectives.
  • Concepts of culture
  • Characteristics of culture
  • Perspectives of culture
2 hrs
Unit-2: Social Organization
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different social organizations;
  • identify the characteristics of kinship, descent, kinship terminology, marriage, etc.;
  • analyze the functions of social organizations in the context of their society.
  • Kinship, descent and kinship terminology
  • Incest taboo
  • Marriage and rules of exogamy and endogamy
  • Different types of marriage
4 hrs
Unit-3: Adaptive Strategies for Making a Living
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine different adaptive strategies of making a living;
  • identify salient features of foraging, horticulture, agriculture, pastoralism, and industrialism;
  • analyze the functions of different adaptive strategies from a cross-cultural comparison of economic systems.
  • Foraging
  • Cultivation (horticulture and agriculture)
  • Pastoralism and industrialism
  • Cross-cultural comparison of production, distribution, exchange, and market systems
4 hrs
Unit-4: Comparative Political Systems
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the comparative political systems;
  • identify salient features of different political systems;
  • analyze the functions of the stateless and state-based political systems.
  • Stateless society- band, tribe, and chiefdom
  • The state
4 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Social Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • examine the patterns of social inequality;
  • identify the root causes of social inequality;
  • analyze and critically evaluate race, ethnicity, caste, and gender in the context of own society.
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
  • Caste
  • Gender
Unit-6: Religion from Anthropological Perspective
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different concepts of religion from an anthropological perspective;
  • identify different aspects of religion, beliefs, and rituals;
  • analyze the relationship of religion with culture.
  • Religion
  • Culture- beliefs, and rituals
  • Religious practitioners
4 hrs
Unit-7: Colonialism and Neo-colonialism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history of colonialism and neo-colonialism;
  • identify major differences between colonialism and neo-colonialism;
  • analyze and critically evaluate the role and impact of colonialism and neo-colonialism.
  • Historical background
  • Domination
  • Exploitation and their impacts
4 hrs
Unit-8: Modern World System
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the modern world system;
  • identify salient features of the modern world-system;
  • analyze the pattern of global stratification, poverty and class
  • Global stratification and poverty
  • The open and closed class system
2 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Barbara, D. Miller

1999 Cultural Anthropology. Boston: Allyn Bacon.

Kottak, C. Phillip

2002 Cultural Anthropology. Boston: McGraw-Hill, Inc.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Nanda, Serena, and Richard L. Warms

2012 Culture Counts: A Concise Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. London: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

আহমেদ, রেহনুমা, ও মানস চৌধুরী
২০০৬ নৃবিজ্ঞানের প্রথমপাঠ। ঢাকা: একুশে প্রকাশনী লিমিটেড।

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 152: THE BEGINNING OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORIES

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course will offer an introduction to the background of anthropological theories. It will also emphasize on the development of the evolutionary school and the reaction against it in terms of diffusionism and historical particularism. 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the background of anthropological ideas and thoughts developed over time;
  • Understand the contexts where travelers, missionaries, and colonial administrators attempted to construct the image of non-European people;
  • Interpret the attempts of scholars and armchair anthropologists from the west to transform these narratives into grand theories of socio-cultural evolution;
  • Understand different issues of diffusionist and historical particularist schools;
  • Examine the impact of these schools on the making of anthropology as a distinctive discipline.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Intellectual Roots
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain intellectual roots to the concept of ‘the other’ by western philosophy;
  • identify major aspects of conceptualizing other culture;
  • analyze the concepts of others and culture through a critical understanding of the accounts of western missionaries and colonial administrators.
  • Europe encountering ‘the other’ world
  • Conceptualizing other culture: the accounts of western travelers, missionaries and colonial administrators
  • The triumph of scientific evolutionist theory: its impact on social thought and theorizing ‘culture’
12 hrs
Unit-2: The Rise of Socio-cultural Evolutionist Thought
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the rise of sociocultural evolutionism;
  • identify basic features of evolutionist theories;
  • analyze and critically evaluate the thought of socio-cultural evolutionists towards institutionalizing anthropology as an academic discipline.
  • Herbert Spencer (‘Social Darwin’), Sir Henry James Sumner Maine, Robert Briffault, Johann Jakob Bachofen, and J. F. Maclennan
  • Cross-cultural studies and classical evolutionism in anthropology: Lewis Henry Morgan, Friedrich Engels
  • British Evolutionists: Edward Burnett Tylor, Robert Ranulf Marett, and James George Frazer
  • Institutionalization of anthropology as an academic discipline
16 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-3: Diffusionism and Anti-evolutionist Campaigning
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the fundamentals of diffusionism;
  • identify basic characteristics of diffusionism;
  • analyze diffusionists’ perspectives for the anti-evolutionist campaign.
  • The concept of ‘culture area’
  • German diffusionism
  • British diffusionism
  • American diffusionism
16 hrs
Unit-4: Historical Particularism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the fundamentals of historical particularism;
  • identify basic characteristics of historical particularism;
  • analyze the contexts of making North American anthropology.
  • Franz Boas, Alfred Louis Kroeber, and Robert Lowie
  • The Boasian attack on evolutionism
  • The making of North American anthropology
12 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination. 

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Erickson, Paul A. and Liam D. Murphy

2003 A History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Erickson, Paul A. and Liam D. Murphy, eds.

2001 Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Kuper, Adam

1988 The Invention of Primitive Society: Transformations of an illusion. London: Routledge.

McGee R. J. and Richard L. Warms

2008 Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Moore, Jerry D.

2009 Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological Theories and Theorists. Lanham: Altamira Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT        

Kucklick, Henrika

1991 The Savage Within: The Social History of British Anthropology 1885-1945. Cambridge: The Cambridge University Press.

Kucklick, Henrika

1996 Islands in the Pacific: Darwinian Biogeography and British Anthropology. American Ethnologists 23(3):611-628.

Kucklick, Henrika

2008 The British Tradition: A New History of Anthropology. Maldes, MA: Blackwell Publications.

Lowie, Robert

1937 History of Ethnological Theory. New York: Farrer and Rinehart.

Lowie, Robert

1920 Primitive Society. New York: Bone and Liveright.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 153: KINSHIP AND SOCIAL ORGANIZATION 

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO) 

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The purpose of this course is to introduce students with the basic concepts and issues of kinship and social organizations. This will also help them to learn about the nature of kinship relations, the development of ‘modern’ reproductive technologies, and the emergence of new patterns in kinship systems of Bangladesh.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand Kinship as enculturation process, family life, social values, and structures of the communities;
  • Analyze the kinship system in non-literate and contemporary societies and its functions;
  • Examine kinship in traditional and modern cultures;
  • Understand different social organizations such as marriage, alliance, and family;
  • Understand the nature of kinship relations, ‘modern’ reproductive technologies, and changing patterns in kinship systems of Bangladesh.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of kinship studies;
  • identify salient features of kinship;
  • analyze the background and significance of kinship studies with critical understandings.
  • The nature of kinship
  • Background and significance of kinship studies
4 hrs
Unit-2: Kinship System
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • Explain different kinship systems;
  • identify different types of descent;
  • analyze the functions of descent.
  • Descent and its types
  • Extensions of unilineal descent groups: lineages, clans, phratry, moiety, and tribe
8 hrs
Unit-3: Kinship Terminology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different kinship terminologies explained by Morgan and Lowie;
  • identify major characteristics of kinship terminology;
  • analyze the significance of kinship terminology concerning language, culture, and society.
  • Classification offered by Morgan, Lowie, and Murdock
  • Significance of kinship terminology and its relationship with language, culture, and society
8 hrs
Unit-4: Marriage and Alliance
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different types of marriage system;
  • identify major differences among different types of marriage;
  • analyze the functions of marriage, marital transactions, divorce, death, and remarriage.
  • Types and practices of marriage
  • Post-marital residence and marital transactions
  • Divorce, death, and remarriage
4 hrs
Unit-5: Theories of Incest Taboo
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain incest taboo;
  • identify salient features of incest and incest taboo;
  • analyze the theories of incest taboo with critical understandings.
  • Theories of the incest taboo
4 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Family from a Cross-cultural Perspective
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different types of the family from a cross-cultural perspective;
  • identify major characteristics of different types of family;
  • analyze the functions of the family with evolutionary and feminist perspectives.
  • Types of the family: the family of orientation, family of procreation, nuclear and extended family, joint and stem family
  • Evolution of family
  • Feminist perspectives on family
Unit-7: Household as a Unit of Analysis
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different types of household;
  • identify different types of household with specific characteristics;
  • analyze the functions of the household of Bengal.
  • Composition of household, and different types of household
  • Household as an economic unit
  • Changes in the composition of household in Bengal
8 hrs
Unit-8: Domestic Group
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the development cycle of domestic groups;
  • identify salient features of the domestic group;
  • analyze the functions of the domestic group.
  • The development cycle of the domestic group
4 hrs
Unit-9: Gender, Politics, and Kinship
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain relationships between gender and kinship, and politics and kinship;
  • identify crucial aspects of gender and politics in kinship;
  • analyze the functions of gender and politics in kinship with reference from their society.
  • Gender dimensions and kinship
  • Politics and kinship
4 hrs
Unit-10: New Reproductive Technology and Changing Nature of Family and Kinship
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain new reproductive technology and changing pattern of family and kinship;
  • identify major aspects of new reproductive technology;
  • analyze case studies on reproductive technology and changing the nature of family and kinship with reference from their society.
  • New reproductive technology
  • Changing the nature of family and kinship
  • Selected case studies
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination
 

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Fox, Robin

1984 Kinship and Marriage. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Holy, Ladislav

1996 Anthropological Perspective on Kinship. London: Pluto Press.

Keesing, Roger Martin

1975 Kin Groups and Social Structure. New York: Holt, Rineheart and Winston, Inc.

Neting, Robert McC, with Richard R. Wilk and Eric J. Arnold, eds.

1984 Households: Comparative and Historical studies of the Domestic Groups. Berkeley: University of California press.

Saradamoni, K., ed.

1999 Finding the Household: Conceptual and methodological Issues. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Segalen, Martine

1984 Historical Anthropology of Family. Cambridge: Cambridge University press.

Stone, Linda

2001 New Directions in Anthropological Kinship. New York: Rowman& Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Thorne, Barry and Marilyn Yalom (eds.)

1982 Rethinking Family: Some Feminist Questions. New York and London: Longman.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Barnard, Alan, and Anthony Good

1984 Research Practices in the Study of Kinship. London: Academic Press.

Benokraitis, Nijole

2002 Contemporary Ethnic Families in the United States. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Counts, Dorothy Ayers, with Judith K. Brown and Jacquelyn C. Campbell

1992 Sanction and Sanctuaries: Culture perspectives on the beating of wives. Boulder Colorado: Westview Press.

Engels, Friedrich

1972 [1884] The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State. New York: Pathfinder Press.

Evans-Pritchard, Edward Evan

1940 The Nuer: A Description of the Modes of Livelihood and Political Institutions of a Nilotic People. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Graburn, Nelson, ed.

1971 Readings in Kinship and Social Structure. New York: Harper and Row.

Goody, Jack, ed.

1958 Developmental Cycle in Domestic Groups.New York: Cambridge University Press.

Goody, Jack

1976 Production and Reproduction: A Comparative Study of the Domestic Domain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Goody, Jack, and Stanley J. Tambiah, eds.

1973 Bride Wealth and Dowry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lewis, Oscar

1959 Five Families. New York: A Mentor Book.

Maynes, Mary Jo, with Ann Waltner, BirgitteSoland and Ulrike Strasser, eds.

1996 Gender, Kinship, Power: A Comparative and Interdisciplinary History. New York: Routledge.

Oxfeld, Ellen

1992 Blood, Sweat, and Mahjong: Family and Enterprise in an overseas Chinese community. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Pasternak, Burton, with Carol Ember and Melvin Ember, eds.

1997 Sex, Gender and Kinship. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Potter, Sulamith Heins

1977 Family Life in a Northern Thai village: A structural study in the significance of Women. Berkeley: University of California press.

Stack, Carol

1997 All Our Kin. New York: Basic Books.

Stone, Linda

1997 Kinship and Gender. Boulder: Westview Press.

Taylor, Debbie

1994 My Children, My God: A Journey to the World of seven single Mothers. Berkeley: University of California press.

Van den Berghe, Pierre L.

1990 Human Family Systems: An evolutionary view. New York: Waveland Press, Inc.

আহমেদ, রেহনুমা, ও মানস চৌধুরী
২০০৬ নৃবিজ্ঞানের প্রথমপাঠ। ঢাকা: একুশে প্রকাশনী লিমিটেড।
ইসলাম, জাহিদুল
২০০৫ আত্মীয়তার সম্পর্ক ও বিবাহ: একটি নৃবৈজ্ঞানিক দৃষ্টিভঙ্গি। ঢাকা: গেস্নাব পাবলিশার্স।

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 154: FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course provides students with a detailed introduction to the principles and methods of physical anthropology. It highlights the evolutionary process through a critical theoretical understanding and discusses how this process shaped who we are today.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand major theories and debates regarding human origin;
  • Explain detail discussion on living primates, major hominid groups, their tools, fossil records, and the process of emergence of bipedalism;
  • Understand anthropometry, human variation, and research methods in physical anthropology.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history and subject matter of physical anthropology;
  • identify major features of physical anthropology;
  • analyze the relationship of physical anthropology with other disciplines.
  • Definition and subject matter of physical anthropology
  • Historical background of physical anthropology
  • Relationship of physical anthropology with other disciplines that study human biology
2 hrs
Unit-2: Research Methods in Physical Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different research methods of physical anthropology;
  • identify major aspects of different dating methods;

analyze the application of dating methods to date fossils and reconstructing evolutionary history.

  • Dating methods and techniques-systematic survey, excavation
  • Relative dating (stratigraphic placement, fluorine absorption analysis)
  • Absolute dating (carbon 14, potassium-argon, molecular analysis)
  • Concerns to date fossils, dating methods as a means of reconstructing evolutionary history and identifying patterns of change
Unit-3: Primates
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the different classification of primates;
  • identify salient features of primates;
  • analyze the social life of the primates.
  • Primates and primate tendencies
  • Classification of primates: prosimians, Anthropoidea (new world monkey, old-world monkey, apes, humans), their similarities and differences
  • Primate social groups
4 hrs
Unit-4: Origin of Human
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the development of evolutionary ideas about the origin of human species;
  • identify major aspects of different theories on evolution;

analyze modern evolutionary thoughts to understand the origin of humans.

  • Creationism, catastrophism, and development of the evolutionary idea (Carolus Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin, Jean Baptiste Pierre Antoine De Monet De Lamarck, Charles Lyell)
  • Natural selection theory (Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace),
  • Neo-Darwinism,
  • Gregor Johann Mendel’s law
  • Genetics and modern evolutionary theory
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Hominid Evolution
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain hominid evolution from different time scales;
  • identify the differences among different stages of hominid evolution;

analyze the hominid evolution process with changes in geographical time scales, physiological characteristics of hominids, and hominid tools.

  • Geological time scales- Paleozoic, Mesozoic, Cenozoic (Paleocene, Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, Pliocene, Pleistocene)
  • Physiological characteristics to identify major hominid groups (dental patterns, cranial capacity, the shape of the pelvis, location of the foramen magnum, changes in sagittal crest)
  • The emergence of bipedalism (roles of environment, food habit, physiological changes)
  • Changes in hominid tools (Oldowan, Acheulean, Mousterian, Magdalenian)
4 hrs
Unit-6: Anthropometry
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain anthropometry as a tool of physical anthropology;
  • identify the functions of different tools of anthropometry;
  • analyze the processes of anthropometry with a critical evaluation to classify humans into racial, ethnic, and national groups through case studies.
  • Definition and main branches of anthropometry (Craniometry, Osteometry, Cephalometry, Somatometry, and Anthroposcopy)
  • Criticisms of anthropometry to classify human beings into racial, ethnic, and national groups
  • Uses of anthropometry in recent times
4 hrs
Unit-7: Human variations, adaptations and the concept of “race”
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain human variation, adaptation, and the concept of ‘race’;
  • identify major criticisms and debates on race;
  • analyze contemporary notions of human diversity with a critical understanding of biological and cultural constructions of race.
  • Historical views of human variation, the origin of the idea of “superior race”
  • Later criticisms of and the debates on the biological or cultural constructions of race
  • Contemporary interpretations of human population diversity, adaptive significance, and the role of environmental and cultural factors.
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Boaz, Noel T., and Alan J. Almquist

1996 Biological Anthropology: A Systematic Approach to Human Evolution. London: Prentice-Hall.

Driben, Paul, and Harvey Herstein

2002Portrait of Humankind. Boston: Pearson Custom.

Jolly, Clifford  J., and Randall White

1995 Physical Anthropology and Archaeology. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.

Kelso, A. J.

1974 Physical Anthropology: An Introduction. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott.

Kottak, Conrad Philip

2003Physical Anthropology and Archaeology. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.

Jurmain, Robert, with Lynn Kilgore, Wenda Trevathan, and Russell L. Ciochon

2011 Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Bennett, Kenneth A.

1979 Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology. Dubuque: Wm. C. Brown Company.

Birdsell, J. B.

1972 Human Evolution: An Introduction to the New Physical Anthropology. Chicago: Rand McNally& Company.

Buettner-Janusch, John

1966 Origins of Man: Physical Anthropology. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Campbell, Bernard Grant

2009 Human Evolution: An Introduction to Man’s Adaptations. New Burnswick and London: Aldine Transaction.

Darwin, Charles

1866 On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. London: John Murray.

Das, B. M.

1992 Outlines of Physical Anthropology. Calcutta: Kitab Mahal Agencies.

Jones, S., with R. Martin and D. Pibeam

1994The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kottack, Conrad Phillip

2008 Anthropology: The Exploration of Human Diversity. New York: McGraw-Hill Companies.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 155: FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH & ACADEMIC WRITING

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course is designed to help students develop communicative competence in English. To achieve this goal a task-based learner-centered approach will be adopted. Emphasis will be given on listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as grammar. That is learners will do a variety of activities in the class to become a fluent speaker and effective writer and reader.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the major issues required for the four skills of listening, reading, writing, and speaking English;
  • Understand issues of grammar and vocabulary.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Listening
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different ideas for listening practices;
  • identify specific listening skills and attitudes;
  • analyze and perform a listening skill for communication and academic writing.
  • Listening for main ideas
  • Listening for specific information
  • Listening for good pronunciation, stress, and intonation
2 hrs
Unit-2: Reading
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different ideas for reading practices;
  • identify specific reading skills and attitudes;
  • analyze and perform the reading skill to improve vocabulary academic understandings.
  • Reading for gist
  • Reading for specific information
  • Finding out the writer’s point of view, attitude, and arguments
  • Reading to improve vocabulary and sentence skills
2 hrs
Unit-3: Writing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different ideas for developing sentence and writing skills;
  • identify major writing techniques;
  • analyze paragraph, narrative, and book review.
  • Developing sentence skills
  • Different stages of writing: brainstorming, pre-writing, draft, revising, editing
  • Writing paragraph: topic sentence, supporting details, different patterns of paragraph development
  • Writing personal and business letters, and e-mails
  • Writing narrative and description
  • Writing a review of books and films
4 hrs
Unit-4: Speaking
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different ideas for speaking practices;
  • identify specific speaking skills and attitudes;
  • analyze and perform speaking skills to improve discussion, social expressions, and presentations.
  • Greetings and social expressions
  • Discussion
  • Role-play
  • Interviews
  • Impromptu talks
  • Presentations
  • Informal debate
Unit-5: Grammar
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain grammatical rules and regulations;
  • identify tenses, verbs, and relative clauses in sentences;
  • analyze the functions of grammar in writing skills.
  • Tenses, verb patterns
  • Questions
  • Relative clauses
  • Expressing quantity
  • Articles and determiners
  • Prepositions
2 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Vocabulary
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain rules of vocabulary to learn words from the context;
  • identify words, synonyms, and antonyms from the context;
  • analyze the functions of vocabulary to learn new words.
  • Learning new words from the context: compound words, antonyms, synonyms, hot verbs
  • Suffixes and prefixes
  • Word pairs
  • Idioms
  • Homophones
4 hrs
Unit-7: Writing Academic Papers and Articles
At the end of this unit students will be able to-

  • explain rules of writing academic papers and articles;
  • identify major aspects of academic papers and articles;
  • analyze articles to examine personal analytical skills.
  • Basic knowledge about writing academic papers and articles
4 hrs
Unit-8: AAA and APA Style Guide
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain general rules of AAA and APA style guide;
  • identify references and citations in papers and articles;
  • analyze and utilize referencing, citation, paraphrasing, and quotation patterns to examine personal skills in writing papers and articles.
  • Referencing
  • Citations
  • Paraphrasing and Quotation
2 hrs
Unit-9: Referencing Software
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the functions of referencing software;
  • identify major aspects of selecting and using referencing software;
  • analyze and utilize referencing software in academic papers and articles.
  • Bib Tex
  • EndNote
  • Ref Works
2 hrs
Unit-10: Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain academic dishonesty and rules regarding plagiarism;
  • identify specific indicators of plagiarism check;
  • analyze plagiarized papers and articles and learn to avoid plagiarism.
  • Academic dishonesty
  • Define plagiarism
  • Rules to avoid plagiarism
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Darley, J. M., with M. P. Zannaand  H. L. Roediger III, eds.

2003 The Complete Academic: A Practical Guide for the Beginning Social Scientist. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Soars, Liz, and John Soars

1998 New Headway, Upper Intermediate, Student’s Book. Oxford:  Oxford University Press.

Turabian, Kate L, with Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams, eds.

2013 A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students & Researchers. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

American Anthropological Association

2009 Style Guide. Arlington, VA: American Anthropological Association.

Langan, John

2007 English Skills with Readings. London and New York: McGraw-Hill Education.

Murphy, Raymond

2012 English Grammar in Use (Intermediate): A Self-study Reference and Practice Book for Intermediate Learners of English, 3rd Edition. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.

The Chicago Manual of Style

2003 The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Edition. New York: Lippincott and Crowell.

The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing

1980 The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing. New York: Lippincott and Crowell.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 156: ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELDWORK AND VIVA-VOCE

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to make students familiar with the ‘field’ in anthropology. In this regard, the major aspects of conducting fieldwork in anthropology will be introduced. This course will provide an approach to common concepts and methodologies in anthropology relating to ethnographic fieldwork. Students will be able to relate their learnings in the classroom with the people, society, and culture in the field through writing a fieldwork report.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Obtain practical orientation to the procedures of field research;
  • Understand the meaning of the field;
  • Understand the procedures followed to conduct fieldwork;
  • Gain the ability to relate their theoretical and methodological understandings with the practical situation of the society.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction: ‘Field’ and ‘Fieldwork’ in Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of field and fieldwork in anthropology;
  • identify various aspects of fieldwork in anthropology;
  • analyze and critically discuss the current debates of fieldwork.
  • Meaning of field in anthropology
  • Features of fieldwork in anthropology
  • Pre-fieldwork planning to post fieldwork representation of data
2 hrs
Unit-2: Fieldwork Issues
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain anthropological knowledge for ethnographic fieldwork of different issues;
  • identify different aspects of the field;
  • analyze and critically reflect the issues of ethics, subjectivity, reflexivity, and fieldwork relationship.
  • Poverty, rural and urban societies
  • Exploration of livelihood
  • Understanding social institutions and the community
  • Kinship, gender, and social issues
  • Climate change, disaster, and development
  • Anthropological study of every aspect of human being, society, culture, economy, and politics
  • Subjectivity, reflexivity, and fieldwork relationship
  • Ethical challenges and ways of addressing these challenges
2 hrs
Unit-3: Conducting Fieldwork
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain fieldwork planning in connection with fieldwork issues;
  • identify salient features of the community studied in the field;
  • analyze and learn to utilize theoretical and methodological understandings to organize fieldwork
  • Fieldwork planning, preparation, and selection of topic
  • Going to the field
  • Training and workshop in the field
  • First-hand experience in the field
  • Conducting fieldwork through using different anthropological research methods
  • Data collection, checking, coding, decoding, and finalization of data
  • Learning to grasp the untold stories from the field to cover fieldwork issues
  • Return from the field
20 hrs
Unit-4: Presentation of Field Data and Report Writing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain data from the field and fieldwork experiences;
  • identify the strengths and weaknesses of the fieldwork;
  • analyze and critically discuss the field situation based on data obtained from the field.
  • The process of data generation
  • Tabulation and summarization
  • Data analysis
  • Presentation of the findings
  • Fieldwork report writing following guidelines
2 hrs
Unit-5: Oral Test (Viva-voce)
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain and communicate effectively on the topics covered by the courses and fieldwork;
  • identify major findings from the fieldwork;
  • analyze and apply reflective analysis to theoretical and applied contexts.
  • Oral defense on the findings from the field
  • Learning from different courses
2 hrs

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Fieldwork report, Oral test (viva-voce).

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Bernard, Harvey Russell

2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.

Fetterman, D. M.

2009 Ethnography: Step-by-step (Vol. 17). Sage Publications.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Bryman, Alan, ed.

2001 Ethnography (4 Volumes). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

Gusterson, Hugh. ed.

2008 Ethnographic Research. In A Pluralist Guide to Qualitative Methods in International Relations. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 115-142.

Clifford, James

1983 On Ethnographic Authority. Representations 1, pp. 118-146.

Bourgois, Philippe

1990 Confronting Anthropological Ethics: Ethnographic Lessons from Central America. Journal of Peace Research 27, pp 43-54.

Warren, Kay B. ed

2001 Telling Truths. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 198-218.

Montejo, Victor D. ed.

2001 Truth, Human Rights, and Representation. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 372-91.