BSS Coures

5.4 SECOND YEAR 4TH SEMESTER BSS (HONORS)

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 251: PSYCHOANALYTICAL SCHOOLS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course introduces students with the theories inspired by Freud in anthropology. These theories are categorized as Neo-Freudian and Post-Freudian theories of psycho-analysis. 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand basic concepts Freudian and Neo-Freudian school in anthropology;
  • Explain Neo-Freudian approaches to the study of culture;
  • Understand post-Freudian psychoanalytic theory (notably Lacan).

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Classical Foundation of Neo-Freudian Theories
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain psychosocial development of humans, the structure of the human mind;
  • identify Freudian explanation of the relations between the individual and culture;
  • analyze the economic ordering of the society and present arguments for or against the solution of social pathologies through social reflexivity.
  • Freudian psychoanalysis – The Freudian concept of human development – Freudian analysis of culture and civilization
  • Alfred Adler and his successors
  • The Frankfurt School: Eric Fromm and Herbert Marcuse
16 hrs
Unit-2:  Neo-Freudian Approaches to the Study of Culture
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain Neo-Freudian approaches to the study of culture;
  • identify major points discussed by Mead, Benedict, and Du Bois;
  • analyze and present the argument against the Neo-Freudian study of culture and personality.
  • Margaret Mead
  • Ruth Benedict
  • Cora Du Bois
12 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-3: Post-Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of mirror stage of infant development, the concept of other;
  • identify the concept of three orders and distinguish between the imaginary, the symbolic, and the real;
  • analyze human conduct through the Lacanian concepts of desire and drive.
  • Lacanian psychoanalysis
12 hrs
Unit-4: Post-Lacanian Psychoanalytic Theories of Culture
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of intertextuality, the semiotic, and abjection;
  • identify major points discussed by Kristeva and Irigaray in studying culture;
  • analyze and evaluate the differences between the way men and women speak and focus on sexual differences.
  • Julia Kristeva
  • Luce Irigaray
16 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Barnard, Alan

2001 History and Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Erickson, Paul A., and Liam D. Murphy, eds.

2001 Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Hall, Calvin S.

1998 Theories of Personality. New York: Wiley.

McGee R. J. and Richard L. Warms

2008 Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Sarup, Madan

1993 An Introductory Guide to Post-structuralism and Post-modernism. Hertfordshire: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Simons, Jon, ed.

2004 Contemporary Critical Theories. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Smith, Philip

2001 Cultural Theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

Upadhay, V.S., and Gaya Pandey

1993 History of Anthropological Thought. New Delhi: Concept Publishing Company.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Elliot, Anthony

1994 Psychoanalytic Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Benedict, Ruth

1934 Patterns of Culture. New York: Houghton Mifflin.

Benedict, Ruth

1946 The Chrysanthemum and the Sword. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Du-Bois, Cora

1944 The People of Alor: A Social Psychological Study of an East Indian Island. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Freud, Sigmund

1930 Civilization and Its Discontents. New York: Jonathan Cape and Harrison Smith.

Irigaray, Luce

1991 The Irigaray Reader. Margaret Whitford, ed. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell.

Kaplan, Bert

1961 Studying Personality Cross-Culturally. Evanston: Raw, Peterson.

Kristeva, Julia

1982 Powers of Horror. New York: Columbia University Press.

Lacan, Jacques

1977 Ecrits: A Selection. London: Tavistock.

Linton, Ralph

1945 The Cultural Background of Personality. New York: Appleton.

Mead, Margaret

1928 Coming of Age in Samoa. New York: Morrow.

Mead, Margaret

1930 Growing Up in New Guinea. New York: Blue Ribbon.

Mead, Margaret

1935 Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies. New York: Morrow.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 252: URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course aims to make students familiar with the basic concepts and issues of urban anthropology.  This course will contain the issues of urbanism and urbanization; kinship, family and neighborhood in an urban setting, urban social stratification, environment, and research methods relevant to urban anthropology.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Familiarize with basic concepts and issues of urban anthropology;
  • Understand research methods suited for research in the urban context;
  • Critically evaluate the relationship between urbanization, poverty, and environmental issues;
  • Contrasting urbanization in developed and developing countries.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Development of Urban Anthropology as a Sub-field
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain urban anthropology;
  • identify major points to the development of urban anthropology;
  • analyze the context of studying urban anthropology through an understanding of its development as a sub-field.
  • Meaning and definition of urban anthropology
  • The historical context of its development
4 hrs
Unit-2:  Research Methods for Urban Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain research methods designed for urban anthropology;
  • identify research problems of the cities and formulate research plans;
  • analyze urban research findings cross-culturally.
  • Techniques of data collection in urban scenarios
  • Doing fieldwork in cities
  • Multi-sited ethnography
4 hrs
Unit-3: Cities in Time and Space
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of the city;
  • identify salient features of the cities of the different period;
  • analyze the distinctions between the cities of the east and west.
  • Overview of ancient, medieval, and early cities
  • Cities of the east and west
4 hrs
Unit-4: Cities in Developed and Developing Countries
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain and compare cities in developed and developing countries;
  • identify major characteristics of urban growth;
  • analyze the connection between free trade, privatization, and development of cities with theoretical understandings;
  • Nature and characteristics of urban growth
  • Rural-urban migration
  • Growth of the cities
  • Theories of urban growth- Louis Warth, Oscar Lewis, Robert Ezra Park, Ernest Burgess, Gidden Zobers
8 hrs
Unit-5: Urbanism as a Way of Life
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the changes among the population during the transition from rural to urban settings;
  • identify different aspects of urban life;
  • analyze the pattern of urbanization with cross-cultural studies.
  • Culture of poverty
  • Urban kinship pattern and family
  • Impact of urbanization and industrialization on domestic groups
  • Changing the pattern and future of kinship in the urban way of life
  • Historical aspects of urbanization
  • Cross-cultural studies of urbanization
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: The Urban Neighborhood
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of urban neighborhood;
  • identify salient features of the urban neighborhood;
  • analyze the development of social groups beyond kinship groups.
  • Networks and associations in the cities
8 hrs
Unit-7: Classes, Caste, and Ethnicity
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nexus of class, caste, and ethnicity in cities;
  • identify major aspects of the class, caste, and ethnicity in cities;
  • analyze the pattern of urban social stratification.
  • Social stratification and pluralism in complex societies
  • Class, caste, and ethnicity in urban areas
4 hrs
Unit-8: Environment of Mega Cities
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain human-induced causes of environmental degradation in the cities;
  • identify major aspects of environmental problems in megacities;
  • analyze the impact of the environment on cities and structural issues of urbanization.
  • Environmental problems of megacities
  • Planning and implementing reforms of cities
8 hrs
Unit-9: Peasant Culture
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the peasant system of Bangladesh;
  • identify the composite form of the social organization of the cities;
  • analyze the nature and tradition of third world cities with case-studies from Bangladesh.
  • The third world cities- a case of Bangladesh
4 hrs
Unit-10: Slums and Squatters in the Cities of Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the pattern of slums in the cities;
  • identify salient aspects of slums and squatters of the cities;
  • analyze cities and their relations with developments of slums and squatters in Bangladesh.
  • Population inflation and urban invasion
  • Slums and squatters in the cities of Bangladesh
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Basham, Richard Dalton

1978 Urban Anthropology: The cross-cultural study of complex societies. New York: Mayfield Pub. Co.

Fox, Richard G.

1977 Urban Anthropology: Cities in Their Cultural Settings. New York: Prentice Hall.

Gmelch, George, and Walter P. Zenner, eds.

2002 Urban Life: Readings in Urban Anthropology. Prospect Heights: Waveland Press.

Roberts, Bryan

1979 Cities of Peasants: The Political Economy of Urbanization in the Third World. London: Edward Arnold.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Abrams, Charles

1966 Man’s Struggle for Shelter in an Urbanizing World. Harvard and London: The MIT Press.

Afsar, Rita

2000, Rural-urban Migration in Bangladesh: Causes, Consequences and challenges. Dhaka: The University Press Limited.

Aidan, Southall, ed.

1973 Urban Anthropology. London and New York: Oxford University Press.

Alavi, Hamza, and Teodor Shanin, eds.

1982 Introduction to the Sociology of ‘Developing Societies’. London: Macmillan.

Banton, B.

1998 Urban Anthropology. New York: Oxford University Press.

Basham, Richard Dalton ed.

1973 The City in Newly Developing Countries. Palo Alto, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company.

Begum, Anawara

1999 Destination Dhaka- Urban Migration: Expectations and Reality. Dhaka: The University Press Limited.

Clark, David

1996 Urban World/Global City. New York: Routledge.

Cohen, Abner, ed.

1974 Urban Ethnicity. London: Tavistock Publications.

Chowdhury, Rafiqul Huda

1980 Urbanization in Bangladesh. Dacca: Centre for Urban Studies.

Drakakis-Smith, David

1987 The Third World City. London: Metheun.

Foster, George M., and Robert V. Kemper, eds.

1994 Anthropologists in Cities. Boston: Little Brown.

Gans, Herbert J.

1982 The Urban Villagers: Group and Class in the Life of Italian-Americans. New York: The Free Press.

Hauser, Philip M., and Schrove F. Leo

1965 The Study of Urbanization. New York: John Witey and Sans, Inc.

Islam, N., ed.

1994 Urban Research in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Centre for Urban Studies.

Southall, Aidan, ed.

1973 Urban Anthropology: Cross-cultural Studies of Urbanization. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wilson, William Julius

1987 The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 253: ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course aims to introduce students with the basic issues and concepts of economic anthropology. It will offer an analysis of how human societies provide the material goods and services, and the realization of final consumption that makes life possible. Different economic systems, money and market, ecosystems and economies, perspectives in economic anthropology, and development will also be introduced with examples from different cultures.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Introduce basic issues and concepts of economic anthropology;
  • Understand economic systems in cross-cultural perspectives;
  • Critical evaluation of economic upliftment projects through the lens of anthropology.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introducing Economic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of economic anthropology;
  • identify the scope of economic anthropology;
  • analyze and contextualize anthropological understanding of economic life.
  • Scope of economic anthropology
  • Phases of economic activities- production, distribution, and consumption
4 hrs
Unit-2:  Economic Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different economic systems cross-culturally;
  • identify and differentiate the typologies and characteristics of different societies in terms of economic processes;
  • analyze the distinctive features of different economic systems to understand the evolutionary process.
  • Hunting-gathering economy
  • Shifting agricultural economy
  • Horticultural economy
  • Agricultural economy
  • Industrial economy
12 hrs
Unit-3: Perspectives in Economic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different perspectives in economic anthropology;
  • identify the distinctive features of substantive and formalist perspectives;
  • analyze and comprehend the theoretical debates on economic systems.
  • Substantive, formalist, and Marxist ecological perspectives
  • Karl Polanyi and the embeddedness of economic activities
  • Decisions and choices- the rationality of economic actors
  • Production and reproduction
12 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: Money and Market
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain money and market;
  • identify basic functions of money and market;
  • analyze and compare the development of medium and processes of exchange
  • Forms and functions of money
  • Evolution and circulation of money
  • Features, functions, and evolution of the market
  • Market relations, market channels, and market culture
  • Goods and commodities
  • Consumption and consumerism
10 hrs
Unit-5: Ecology, Ecosystem, and Economics
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relationships between nature, culture, and economy;
  • identify major aspects of resource management and ecological economics;
  • analyze the connections between ecology, ecosystem, and economics from anthropological perspectives.
  • Nature, culture, and economy
  • Resource management and carrying capacity
  • Access to resources and exploitation
  • Ecologic concerns of economic activities
  • Ecological economics
10 hrs
Unit-6: Economic Anthropology and Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical emergence of development as a concept;
  • identify major debates concerning development;
  • analyze and critically evaluate the discourse of development and aggravated inequality in the world.
  • Conceptualizing development
  • Discourses of development
  • Global capitalism and the modern world system
  • Making and unmaking of the third world
  • Development as a social movement
  • Capability, freedom and human development
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Carrier, James G., eds.

2005 A Handbook of Economic Anthropology. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Escobar, Arturo

1995 Encountering Development. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Plattner, Stuart

1989 Economic Anthropology. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Wood, Donald C., ed.

2007 Choice in Economic Contexts: Ethnographic and Theoretical Enquiries. Amsterdam: Elsevier Ltd.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Dalton, George

1971 Economic Anthropology and Development. New York: Basic Books.

Gardner, Katy, and David Lewis

1995 Anthropology, Development and the Postmodern Challenge. London: Pluto Press.

Gudenam, Stephen

2001 The Anthropology of Economy. Wiley: Wiley-Blackwell.

Haenn, Nora, and Richard R.Wilk, eds.

2006The Environment in Anthropology: A Reader in Ecology, Culture, and Sustainable Living. New York: New York University Press.

Halperin, Rhoda

1988 Economics Across Cultures. London: Macmillan.

Islam, Rafiul

2011, “Changing Patterns of Economic Life of Santals and Oraons in the Barind Region of Bangladesh”, Social Science Review [The Dhaka University Studies, Part-D], Vol. 28, No. 2, Dhaka: Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Dhaka, pp. 103-118.

Islam, Rafiul

2016, “Strategic Indebtedness: Changing Economic Relations among the Oraons in Bangladesh”, Social Science Review [The Dhaka University Studies, Part-D], Vol. 33, No. 2, Dhaka: Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Dhaka, pp. 127-140.

LeClair, Edward, and Harold Schneider

1968 Economic Anthropology: Readings in Theory and Analysis. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Mintz, Sidney W.

1985 Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Viking Books.

Mosse, David, and David Lewis, eds.

2005 The Aid Effect: Giving and Governing in International Development. London: Pluto Press.

Nakajima, Chihiro

1986 Subjective Equilibrium Theory of the Farm Household. Amsterdam: The Netherlands: Elsevier Publishers B.V.

Narotzky, S.

1997 New Directions in Economic Anthropology. London: Pluto Press.

Polanyi, Karl, with C. M. Arensberg and Harry W. Pearson, eds.

1957 Trade and Market in the Early Empires; Economies in History. Glencoe, IL: Free Press.

Sahlins, Marshal

1965 On the sociology of primitive exchange. In The Relevance of Models for Social Anthropology, ASA Monographs 1. Michael Banton, ed. London: Tavistock Publications.

Sandlin, Jennifer A., and Peter McLaren, eds.

2010 Critical Pedagogies of Consumption: Living and Learning in the Shadow of the “Shopocalypse”. New York: Routledge.

Wilk, Richard R., and Lisa C. Cliggett

1996 Economies and Cultures: Foundations of Economic Anthropology. New York: Westview Press.

Wolf, Eric R.

1982 Europe and the People Without History. Berkeley: University of California Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 254: ECOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The goal of this course is to give the student an understanding of how anthropologists study the human dimension of environmental problems. The student will study the impact humans have made on the natural environment from an international and a domestic perspective. The course is concerned with people’s perceptions of and interactions with their physical and biological surroundings, and the various linkages between biological, cultural, and linguistic diversity.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Familiarize students with how culture influences the dynamic interactions between human populations and the ecosystems in their habitat through time;
  • Understand relationships between human society and the natural world and how these relationships are culturally mediated;
  • Critically engage with the rise of ecological theory in anthropology;
  • Discuss new directions in ecological anthropology and related approaches to understand human-environment relations.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction: Basic Concepts in Ecological Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of ecological anthropology;
  • identify major aspects of nature, ecology, ecosystem, and environment;
  • analyze concepts of ecological anthropology towards an understanding of ecology and environment.
  • Basic concepts: nature, ecology, ecosystem, and environment
4 hrs
Unit-2:  Theoretical Orientation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different theoretical aspects of cultural ecology, environment, and evolution;
  • identify distinguishing features of technological, sociological, and ideological components of culture;
  • analyze philosophical grounds of treating the living environment as a whole regardless of their instrumental utility to human needs
  • Cultural ecology (Julian H. Steward)
  • Neo-evolutionism (Leslie A. White)
  • Cultural materialism (Marvin Harris)
  • Neo-functionalism and the ecosystem approach (Clifford Geertz and Roy A. Rappaport)
  • Political ecology, event ecology, and progressive contextualization (Roy A. Rappaport and Andrew P. Vayda)
  • Deep ecology (Arne Dekke Eide Næss)
8 hrs
Unit-3: Basic Ecological Issues and Concepts
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain basic ecological issues and concepts in the globalized world;
  • identify major aspects of population growth, community, and conservation;
  • analyze the trends of population growth and its impact on ecology and environment.
  • Population growth, carrying capacity, effects of pollution, ethnoecology, ecological economics
  • Communities and institutions, development and globalization
  • Consumption, the tragedy of the commons, conservation, and sustainability
8 hrs
Unit-4: Resource Management and Mapping
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of resource management and mapping;
  • identify the importance of resource management;
  • analyze the changes in resource management practices cross-culturally.
  • Resource management practice in a cross-cultural perspective
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Globalization, Consumption, Human Rights and Environmentalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the discourses of human rights and environmentalism in the global world;
  • identify basic issues addressed by human rights discourses;
  • analyze the pattern of inequality of consumption practices and its connection with human rights and the environment.
  • Development of human rights discourse and environmentalism
  • Inequality, consumption practices in the global world
8 hrs
Unit-6: Contemporary Ecological Issues in Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the controversies and politics of global climate change;
  • identify major ecological problems in Bangladesh;
  • analyze the development and transformation of ecological issues and discourses in Bangladesh focusing on climate justice, health, indigenous knowledge, and biotechnology.
  • Controversy and politics of global climate change; climate justice
  • Climate change and its impact
  • local perception, adaptation, and mitigation in Bangladesh
  • Climate change and the indigenous population
  • Health and healing from an ecological perspective
  • Green revolution in agriculture: Bangladesh experience
  • Shifting cultivation in CHT and Madhupur region
  • Biotechnology and GM food
12 hrs
Unit-7: Biodiversity and Sustainable Development in Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the needs of biodiversity and sustainable development in Bangladesh;
  • identify major areas for sustainable development in Bangladesh;
  • analyze the contexts of biodiversity and sustainable development in Bangladesh.
  • Context, issues, and linkage of biodiversity
  • Sustainable development issues
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

 

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Beck, Ulrich

1992 Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity. London: SAGE.

Dove, R. Michael, and Carol Carpenter, eds.

2008 Environmental Anthropology: A Historical Reader. UK, USA and Australia: Blackwell Publishing.

Giddens, Anthony

2009 The Politics of Climate Change. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Hannen, Nora, and Richard Wilk, eds.

2006 The Environment in Anthropology: A Reader in Ecology, Culture, and Sustainable Living. New York: New York University Press.

Moran, Emilio F., ed.

1991 The Ecosystem Approach in Anthropology: From Concept to Practice. Michigan: University of Michigan Press.

Moran, Emilio F.

2006 People and Nature. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.

Rappaport, Roy A.

1984 [1968] Pigs for the Ancestors: Ritual in the Ecology of a New Guinea people. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Townsend, Patricia K.

2009 Environmental Anthropology: From Pigs to Policies. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press, Inc.

Vayda, Andrew Peter

1969 Environment and Cultural Behavior: Ecological Studies in Cultural Anthropology. New York: American Museum of Natural History Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Alland, Alexander

1975 Adaptation. Annual Review of Anthropology 4:59-73.

Barth, Fredrik

1956 Ecologic relationships of ethnic groups in Swat, North Pakistan. American Anthropologist 58:1079‑89.

Battersbury, Simon

2008 Anthropology and Global Warming: The Need for Environmental Engagement. Australian Journal of Anthropology 19 (1).

Beck, Ulrich

1995 Ecological Politics in an Age of Risk. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Brand, P., and M. J. Thomas

2005 Urban Environmentalism: Global Change and the Mediation of Local Conflict. New York: Routledge.

Brosius, J. Peter

1999 Anthropological Engagements with Environmentalism. Current Anthropology 40(3):277-288ff.

Brosius, J. Peter

1999 Analyses and interventions: anthropological engagements with environmentalism. Current Anthropology 40(3):277-309.

Crate, Susan A.

2008 Gone the Bull of Winter? Grappling with the Cultural Implications of and Anthropology’s Role(s) in Global Climate Change. Current Anthropology 49(4):569.

Crate, Susan A., and Mark Nuttall, eds.

2009 Anthropology and Climate Change: From Encounters to Actions. Walnut Creek, California: Left Coast Press, Inc.

Dove, M. R.

2006 Indigenous People and Environmental Politics. Annual Review of Anthropology 35:11.1-11.18.

Escobar, Arturo

1999 After nature: Steps to an anti essentialist political ecology. Current Anthropology 40(1): 1-30.

Geertz, Clifford

1963 Agricultural Involution: The Process of Ecological Change in Indonesia. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Harris, Marvin

1999 Theories of Culture in Postmodern Times. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press.

Harris, Marvin

1966 The cultural ecology of India’s sacred cattle. Current Anthropology 7:51-66.

Hassan, Shahed, with Nasir Uddin and Ansarul Karim eds.

2002 Environmental Issues in Bangladesh: An Anthropological Perspective. Dhaka: ECOMAC.

Julian Steward, and Steward. J. H.

1977 [1955] The Concept and Method of Cultural Ecology. In Evolution and Ecology. J. H. Steward, ed. Pp. 43-57. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Kottak, Conrad Phillip

1999 The New Ecological Anthropology. American Anthropologist 101(1):23-35.

Kottak, Conrad Phillip

2005 Assault on Paradise: Social Change in a Brazilian Village. London and New York: McGraw-Hill College.

Little, Paul E.

1999 Environments and Environmentalisms in Anthropological Research: Facing a New Millennium. Annual Review of Anthropology 28:253-284.

Marten, Gerald G.

2003 Human Ecology: Basic Concepts for Sustainable Development. London: Earthscan Publications Ltd.

McElroy, Ann, and Patricia K. Townsend

1989 Medical Anthropology in Ecological Perspective. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.

Merchant, Carolyn

2005Radical Ecology: The Search for a Sustainable World. New York: Routledge.

Milton, Kay

1996 Environmentalism and Cultural Theory: Exploring the role of anthropology in environmental discourse. London and New York: Routledge.

Milton, Kay, ed.

1993 Environmentalism: The View from Anthropology. London and New York: Routledge.

Neumann, Roderick P.

2005 Making political Ecology. London: Hodder Arnold.

Moran, Emilio F.

1979 Human Adaptability: An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.

Moran, Emilio F., and Brondizio, Eduardo S.

2001 Human Ecology from Space: Ecological Anthropology Engages the Study of Global Environmental Change. In Ecology and the Sacred: Engaging the Anthropology of Roy A. Rappaport. Ellen Messer and Michael Lambek, eds. Pp. 64-87. Michigan: University of Michigan Press.

Orlove, Benjamin S.

1980 Ecological Anthropology. Annual Review of Anthropology 9:235-273.

Orlove, Benjamin S., and Stephen B. Brush

1996 Anthropology and the Conservation of Biodiversity. Annual Review of Anthropology 25:329-52.

Peet, Richard, and Michael Watts

2004 Liberation Ecologies: Environment, Development, Social Movements. London and New York: Routledge.

Rappaport, Roy A.

2000 Ritual regulation of environmental relations among a New Guinea people. In Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History. R. Jon McGee and Richard L. Warms, eds. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company.

Rappaport, Roy A.

1971 The Flow of Energy in an Agricultural Society. Scientific American 225(3):116-136.

Robbins, Paul

2004 Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

Sahlins, M.

1978 Culture as protein and profit. New York Review of Books2:45-53.

Sen, Sukanta, with Fatema Zhura Kjhatoon and Tahmina Akhter

2009 Climate Change: Impact and Adaptation strategies of the Indigenous Communities in Bangladesh. Dhaka: BARCIK.

Shafie, Hasan

2000 Scale and Sustainability: A Perspective from Human Ecology. Development Review 12(02):105-116.

Shafie, Hasan

1999 Local Health Knowledge: The State of Arsenic Contamination in Bangladesh. Grassroots Voice: A Journal of Resources and Development 02(02):08–13. Dhaka: BARCIK.

Shafie, Hasan, with Shantana R. Halder, A.K.M. Mamunur Rashid, KaziSunzida Lisa and Hasina Akter Mita, eds.

2009 Endowed Wisdom: Knowledge of Nature and Coping with Disaster in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Comprehensive Disaster Management Programme (CDMP).

Shiva, Vandana

1988 Staying Alive: Women, Ecology and Survival in India. New Delhi:  Zed Press.

Shiva, Vandana

1992 The Violence of the Green Revolution: Ecological degradation and political conflict in Punjab. New Delhi: Zed Press.

Shiva, Vandana and Naria Mies, eds.

1993 Ecofeminism. Nova Scotia, Canada: Fernwood Publications.

Shiva, Vandana

2001 Patents, Myths and Reality. Delhi: Penguin Publications.

Vayda, Andrew Peter, and Bonnie J. McCay

1975 New Directions in Ecology and Ecological Anthropology. Annual Review of Anthropology4:293.

Walters, Bradley B., with Bonnie J. Mccay and Susan Lees

2008 Against the Grain: The Vayda Tradition in Human Ecology and Ecological Anthropology. Lanham, MD: Altamira Press.

Wolf, E. R.

1999 Cognizing cognized models. American Anthropologist 101(1):19- 22.

Zarsky, Lyuba, ed.

2002 Human Rights and the Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World. London and New York: Earthscan Publications Ltd.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 255: COMPREHENSIVE AND VIVA-VOCE

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course Comprehensive and Viva-Voce has two parts: written comprehensive (25 marks) and oral defense (25 marks). Students will sit for this Comprehensive and Viva-Voce examination during the 4th semester of the BSS Honors program. It will test their learning over the last 2 semesters’ (second year 3rd and 4th semesters) courses of the undergraduate program.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Examination of students’ learning from second year 3rd to 4th semesters through a written examination;
  • Judging their analytical skills through a viva-voce examination;
  • A comprehensive understanding of the students learning during the courses learned in these semesters.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • The students will be able to explain anthropological concepts and idea
  • Identify, compare, and analyze anthropological theories and approaches, point of divergences and origin, their interrelations, contradictions, and mutuality; as well as applications of anthropological theories
  • Use anthropological concepts and theories in analyzing and evaluating social contexts, event, or phenomena

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.

ASSESSMENT

Written examination, Oral test (viva-voce).

5.5 THIRD YEAR 5TH SEMESTER BSS (HONORS)

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 301: MARXISM AND ITS OFF-SHOOTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course aims to introduce students to the major ideas of Marx and Engels and their legacies to anthropology. The course offers an introduction to ‘dialects’, and materialist interpretation of history and society. Then it offers a review of the different brands of Marxism, notably, western Marxism, structural Marxism, cultural ecology, American materialism, and neo-Marxism.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the historical context of the concept of dialects;
  • Review different branches of Marxism;
  • Critically understand the concomitant development of Marxism and anthropology;
  • Differentiate between French, British, and American traditions;
  • Explain how Marxism and culture are theorized in anthropology.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Dialects: from Hegel to Marx
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical materialistic approach;
  • identify major areas to the development of Marxian thought;
  • analyze the concepts of class and processes of inequality in the capitalist society.
  • Materialistic interpretation of the history of social evolution- mode of production and socio-economic formation
  • Class and class struggle
  • The labor theory of value
  • Theory of surplus-value, alienation
  • Commodity fetishism and the communist manifesto
12 hrs
Unit-2:  Western Marxism- Culture as Ideology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain theoretical perspectives to evaluate ideological processes in society;
  • identify major aspects of different Western Marxian thinkers;
  • analyze and compare the approach of different schools of thought.
  • Georg Lukacs
  • Antonio Gramsci
  • Walter Benjamin
  • Theodor Adorno
  • Max Horkheimer
  • Jurgen Habermas
  • Louis Althusser
16 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-3: Marxism and Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical and parallel development of Marxism and anthropology;
  • identify major areas of thought of different traditions of Marxism;
  • analyze the contribution of Marxism in anthropology through evaluating French, British and American traditions.
  • French tradition
  • British tradition
  • American tradition
14 hrs
Unit-4: Theorization of Culture and Marxism in Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain thoughts regarding culture and use of the ideas of Marx in anthropology;
  • identify root causes to the study of Marxism and culture in anthropology;
  • analyze theories on culture developed and guided by Marxian thinkers in anthropology.
  • From neo-evolutionism to cultural ecology and cultural materialism
  • Cultural Marxism
  • Political economy and structural Marxism
14 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Anderson, Perry

1979 Considerations on Western Marxism. London: Verso.

Barnard, Alan

2001History and Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bloch, Maurice

1983 Marxism and Anthropology: The History of a Relationship. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Erickson, Paul A., and Liam D. Murphy, eds.

2001 Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Layton, Robert

1997 An Introduction to the Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Smith, Philip

2001 Cultural theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

Morrison, Ken

2006 Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought. London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Moore, Jerry D.

2009 Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological Theories and Theorists. Lanham: Altamira Press.

Ortner, Sherry B.

2001 Theory in Anthropology since the Sixties. In Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Erickson, Paul. A. and Liam D. Murphy, eds. Ontario: Broadview Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Godelier, Maurice

1988 The Mental and the Material: Thought, Economy and Society. London: Verso.

Harris, Marvin

1979 Cultural Materialism: The Struggle for a Science of Culture. New York: Random House.

Marx, Karl, and Fredrick Engels

1967 The Communist Manifesto. S. Moore, trans. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Marx, Karl

1930 The Capital. Eden Paul and Cedar Paul, trans. London: Dent.

Marx, Karl

1964 Pre-capitalist Economic Formations. J. Cohen, trans. New York: International Publishers.

McGee R. J., and Richard L. Warms

2008 Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Meillassoux, Claude

1981 Maidens, Meal and Money: Capitalism and the Domestic Community. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rappaport, Roy A.

2000 Pigs for the Ancestors: Ritual in the Ecology of a New Guinea People. New York: Waveland Press.

Sahlins, Marshall, D.

1972 Stone Age Economics. London: Tavistock Publications Limited.

Sahlins, Marshall, D.

1976 Culture and Practical Reason. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Seddon, David, ed.

1978 Relations of Production. London: Frank Cass and Company Ltd.

Wolf, Eric R.

1982 Europe and the People Without History. Berkeley: University of California Press.