BSS Coures

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 301: MARXISM AND ITS OFF-SHOOTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course aims to introduce students to the major ideas of Marx and Engels and their legacies to anthropology. The course offers an introduction to ‘dialects’, and materialist interpretation of history and society. Then it offers a review of the different brands of Marxism, notably, western Marxism, structural Marxism, cultural ecology, American materialism, and neo-Marxism.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the historical context of the concept of dialects;
  • Review different branches of Marxism;
  • Critically understand the concomitant development of Marxism and anthropology;
  • Differentiate between French, British, and American traditions;

Explain how Marxism and culture are theorized in anthropology.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Dialects: from Hegel to Marx
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical materialistic approach;
  • identify major areas to the development of Marxian thought;
  • analyze the concepts of class and processes of inequality in the capitalist society.
  • Materialistic interpretation of the history of social evolution- mode of production and socio-economic formation
  • Class and class struggle
  • The labor theory of value
  • Theory of surplus-value, alienation
  • Commodity fetishism and the communist manifesto
12 hrs
Unit-2:  Western Marxism- Culture as Ideology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain theoretical perspectives to evaluate ideological processes in society;
  • identify major aspects of different Western Marxian thinkers;
  • analyze and compare the approach of different schools of thought.
  • Georg Lukacs
  • Antonio Gramsci
  • Walter Benjamin
  • Theodor Adorno
  • Max Horkheimer
  • Jurgen Habermas
  • Louis Althusser
16 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-3: Marxism and Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical and parallel development of Marxism and anthropology;
  • identify major areas of thought of different traditions of Marxism;
  • analyze the contribution of Marxism in anthropology through evaluating French, British and American traditions.
  • French tradition
  • British tradition
  • American tradition
14 hrs
Unit-4: Theorization of Culture and Marxism in Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain thoughts regarding culture and use of the ideas of Marx in anthropology;
  • identify root causes to the study of Marxism and culture in anthropology;
  • analyze theories on culture developed and guided by Marxian thinkers in anthropology.
  • From neo-evolutionism to cultural ecology and cultural materialism
  • Cultural Marxism
  • Political economy and structural Marxism
14 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Anderson, Perry

1979 Considerations on Western Marxism. London: Verso.

Barnard, Alan

2001History and Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bloch, Maurice

1983 Marxism and Anthropology: The History of a Relationship. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Erickson, Paul A., and Liam D. Murphy, eds.

2001 Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Layton, Robert

1997 An Introduction to the Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Smith, Philip

2001 Cultural theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

Morrison, Ken

2006 Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought. London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Moore, Jerry D.

2009 Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological Theories and Theorists. Lanham: Altamira Press.

Ortner, Sherry B.

2001 Theory in Anthropology since the Sixties. In Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Erickson, Paul. A. and Liam D. Murphy, eds. Ontario: Broadview Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Godelier, Maurice

1988 The Mental and the Material: Thought, Economy and Society. London: Verso.

Harris, Marvin

1979 Cultural Materialism: The Struggle for a Science of Culture. New York: Random House.

Marx, Karl, and Fredrick Engels

1967 The Communist Manifesto. S. Moore, trans. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Marx, Karl

1930 The Capital. Eden Paul and Cedar Paul, trans. London: Dent.

Marx, Karl

1964 Pre-capitalist Economic Formations. J. Cohen, trans. New York: International Publishers.

McGee R. J., and Richard L. Warms

2008 Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Meillassoux, Claude

1981 Maidens, Meal and Money: Capitalism and the Domestic Community. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rappaport, Roy A.

2000 Pigs for the Ancestors: Ritual in the Ecology of a New Guinea People. New York: Waveland Press.

Sahlins, Marshall, D.

1972 Stone Age Economics. London: Tavistock Publications Limited.

Sahlins, Marshall, D.

1976 Culture and Practical Reason. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Seddon, David, ed.

1978 Relations of Production. London: Frank Cass and Company Ltd.

Wolf, Eric R.

1982 Europe and the People Without History. Berkeley: University of California Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 302: SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

South Asia is considered as a ‘culture area’ to which Bangladesh belongs to. South Asia, including the current political units like Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Maldives, Pakistan, India, and Afghanistan shares many things in common and hence, is referred to as a distinct ‘culture area’. Since it is a requirement in anthropology to specialize in a region, this course provides students the opportunity to have an orientation to the history and culture of South Asia. This course starts with the concepts and perspectives of south Asia and addresses its common history, tradition, and culture. Specific attention has been given to the aspects of religion, politics, gender, nationalism, and ethnicity of South Asian societies.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the historical trajectory of South Asia becoming an object of study;
  • Critically evaluate perspectives of South Asian studies;
  • Impart knowledge on south Asian traditions throughout pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial times;
  • Evaluate the impact of religion on South Asian societies;
  • Analyze gender issues, nationalism, and ethnic conflict in the context of South Asia.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: South Asia as an ‘Object’ of Study
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the context to the development of South Asia;
  • identify major aspects of South Asia;
  • analyze and comprehend how South Asia is represented in academic discourse and its development as a discourse.
  • Conceptualizing South Asia
  • South Asia in the western imagination
  • Geographical boundary
  • Population and cultural identity
8 hrs
Unit-2:  Perspectives in South Asian Studies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the major perspective in South Asian studies;
  • identify basic features of Indology and subaltern studies;
  • analyze different approaches to South Asian studies.
  • Indology
  • Subaltern
6 hrs
Unit-3: History, Culture/Material Culture, Heritage and Tradition in South Asia
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history, culture, and tradition of South Asia;
  • identify salient features of cultural traditions of South Asia;
  • analyze the roots of the development culture, heritage, and tradition in South Asia.
  • Pre-colonial and colonial periods
  • The period of decolonization and the emergence of nation-states
  • The ‘traps’ of modernization and developmental policies
  • Military rule and democracy
8 hrs
Unit-4: Core Conceptual Issues in South Asian Studies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the core concepts in South Asian studies;
  • identify salient features of each of the concepts that shaped South Asia;
  • analyze and compare different concepts used to understand South Asia.
  • Tribe
  • Caste
  • Class
  • Gender
  • Religion
  • Nation
  • State
6 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Religion in South Asia
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the significance of religion to study South Asia;
  • identify major aspects of different religions in South Asia;
  • analyze the development and impact of different religious traditions in South Asia.
  • South Asia as a birthplace of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism
  • Symbolism
  • Syncretism: local adaptation of Islam and Christianity
  • The religion of the ‘laity’- Tantrism, Baulism, Vaishnavism, Pirism, and the like
6 hrs
Unit-6: ‘Caste’ in South Asia
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain caste as a concept in South Asia;
  • identify basic features of caste, purity, and pollution to understand South Asia;
  • analyze the impact of caste in different South Asian countries.
  • Key concepts in understanding caste- ‘jati’, ‘purity and pollution’, ‘karma and dharma’
  • Brahmanism and kingship
  • Caste as an ideology- Dumont and anti-Dumontian perspectives
  • Impact of the caste system on south Asian societies
8 hrs
Unit-7: Gender, Law and Women’s Questions
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nexus of gender, human rights, and historical changes in South Asia;
  • identify different discourses regarding gender, law, and women’s position in South Asia;
  • analyze the discourse of ‘purdah’
  • in the South Asian context.
  • Discourse of SATI
  • The denial of human rights and violence against women e.g. dowry killing, trafficking of women, honor killing, rape, abuse, and sexual harassment
  • Women’s organizations- negotiation and movement
  • The discourse of ‘purdah’
  • Gender in the ‘new’ global economy- reconfiguring kinship and domesticity
8 hrs
Unit-8: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of nationalism and ethnic conflict in South Asia;
  • identify major aspects of different discourses on nationalism and ethnic conflict in South Asia;
  • analyze ethnic conflicts in South Asia through the lens of gender and nationalism.
  • Peace, conflict and everyday life- narratives
  • Discourses of conflict, war, and everyday life
  • The gender of war
6 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Cohn, Bernard S.

1987 Notes on the History of the Study of Indian Society and Culture. In An Anthropologist among the Historians and Other Essays Pp.136-69. Delhi: Oxford U.P.

Cohn, Bernard S.

1987 The Census, Social Structure and Objectification in South Asia. In An Anthropologist among the Historians and Other Essays Pp.224-54. Delhi: Oxford U.P.

Dirks, Nicholas B.

2001Castes of Mind: Colonialism and the Making of Modern India. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Fuller, Chris

1996Caste Today. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Gardner, Andrew M.

2010 City of Strangers: Gulf Migration and the Indian Community in Bahrain. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.

Gombrich, Richard, and Gananath Obeyesekere

1998 Buddhism Transformed: Religious Change in Sri Lanka. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publication.

Mathur, Saloni

2000 History and anthropology in South Asia: Rethinking the archive. Annual Review of Anthropology89-106.

Moni, Lata

1999 Contentious Traditions: The Debate of Sati in Colonial India. In Recasting Women: Essays in Colonial History. Delhi: Permanent Black.

Patel, Reena

2010 Working the Night Shift: Women in India’s Call Center Industry. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Raheja, G. G.

1988 India: Caste, kingship, and dominance reconsidered. Annual Review of Anthropology497-522.

Ring, Laura A.

2006 Zenana: Everyday Peace in a Karachi Apartment Building. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Tambiah, Stanley J.

1992 Buddhism Betrayed? Religion, Politics and Violence in Sri Lanka. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Trawick, Margaret

2007 Enemy Lines: Childhood, Warfare, and Play in Batticaloa. Berkeley: University of California Press.

White, Sarah C.

2012 Beyond the paradox: religion, family and modernity in contemporary Bangladesh. Modern Asian Studies46(05):1429-1458.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Ahearn, Laura M.

2001 Invitations to Love: Literacy, Love Letters, & Social Change in Nepal. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Belie, Ton

2005 Tribal Peoples, Nationalism and Human Rights Challenge: The Adivasi’s of Bangladesh. Dhaka: University Press Limited.

Chatterjee, Partha

1990 The Nationalist Resolution to the Women’s Question. In Recasting Women: Essays in Colonial History. Delhi: Permanent Black.

Chakrabarti, Dilip

1996 Colonial Indology: Socio-Politics of the Ancient Indian Past. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal Pub. Pvt. Ltd.

Dirks, Nicholas B.

1992 Castes of Mind. Representations 37:56-78.

Gain, Philip, ed.

2008 Culture of Adivasis in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD).

Guha, Ranajit

1982 On Some Aspects of Colonial Historiography of Colonial India. In Ranajit Guha,ed. Subaltern Studies I: Writings on South Asian History and Society. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Guha, Ranajit

1996 Small Voices of History. In Amin Shahid and Dipesh Chakrabarty, eds. Subaltern Studies IX: Writings on South Asian History and Society. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Gupta, Dipankar, ed.

1993 Social Stratification. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Ilias, Ahmed, with Abanti Harun and Mizanur Rahman

2006 The Minority Plight: The Case of Linguistic Minority in Bangladesh. Paper presented at the National Conference on State, Violence and Right, Dhaka: Department of Anthropology, Jahangirnagar University.

Mines, Diane and Sarah Lamb

2010 Seven Prevalent Misconceptions about India’s Caste System. In Everyday Life in South Asia Pp.153-4.

Nandy, Ashish

1975 Sati or A Nineteenth Century tale of Women, Violence and Protest. In Ram Mohan Roy and the Process of Modernization in India. New Delhi: Vikas Publications.

Pigg, Stacy Leigh

1996 The Credible and the Credulous: The Question of ‘Villagers’ Beliefs’ in Nepal.  Cultural Anthropology 11(2):160-201.

Raheja, G. G.

1996 Caste, colonialism, and the speech of the colonized: Entextualization and disciplinary control in India. American Ethnologist23(3):494-513.

Singer, Milton

1972 Passage to More than India: A Sketch of Changing European and American Images. In When a Great Tradition Modernizes Pp.1-38. New York: Praeger.

Srinivas, Mysore Narasimhachar

1977Sanskritization: Social Change in Modern India. Hyderabad: Orient Longman.

Tamini, Muhammad, Jahangir

2009 Hinduism in South Asia. South Asian Studies 24(2):221-241.

Tarlo, Emma

1996 Clothing Matters: Dress and Identity in India. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

vanSchendel, Willem

2001 Writing Through Partition: Making a Living in the Bengali Borderlands. International Review of Social History 46:393-421.

Visweswaran, Kamala

1996 Small Speeches, Subaltern Gender: Nationalist Ideology and its Historiography. In Subaltern Studies IX: Writings on South Asian History and Society. Shahid Amin and Dipesh Chakrabarty, eds. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Tharoot, Shashi

2016 An Era of Darkness: The British Empire in India. New Delhi: Aleph Book Company

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 303: ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR) 

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The anthropology of religion is a cross-cultural study of the relationship between humans and the supernatural world. This course involves the exploration and analysis of religious traditions in diverse cultural contexts. Major anthropological perspectives on and theories of religion will be discussed along with various aspects of religious life in both past and contemporary societies.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Exploration of religious traditions in different cultural context;
  • Critically engage with major anthropological perspectives on religion;
  • Understand relationships of religion, culture, and social order in past and contemporary society;
  • Describe the secularization movement and global movements;
  • Understand the symbols and rituals of religion;
  • Analyze religion and social organization.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Religion Observed in Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning and concept of religion in anthropology;
  • identify basic aspects of studying religion addressing problems of defining religion;
  • analyze the importance of studying religions of non-western societies in understanding our societies.
  • Problems of defining religion
  • Origin of the interests of anthropologists in studying the religions of non-western cultures i.e. the occult, the sacred, the esoteric, the mystic, and the supernatural
  • Religion as an object of anthropological inquiry
4 hrs
Unit-2:  Theories of Religion
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the theories that explain the development of religion;
  • identify major aspects of theorizing religion;
  • analyze the politics behind how religion is represented.
  • Cognitive, behavioral, social order, psychological, cultural, and the like
  • Rationality and religion
  • The politics of representation
4 hrs
Unit-3: Psychological Aspects of Religion
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the psychological explanation of religion;
  • identify major issues covered by the psychological study of religion;
  • analyze the relations between anxiety, uncertainty, and ritual.
  • The relation between anxiety, uncertainty, and ritual
4 hrs
Unit-4: Symbolism in Religion
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the symbolism in religion;
  • identify basic features of symbols, myths, totems, and cosmologies;
  • analyze and compare symbolism, its historical interpretation, and changes in order.
  • Symbolism: Symbols, myths, totems and cosmologies
  • Interpretations and changes
6 hrs
Unit-5: Secularization Triumphant and the Retreat of Secularization
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain conceptual understandings in association with secularization and religion;
  • identify contemporary challenges to the secularization thesis;
  • analyze the revival of religion and resurgence of fundamentalism with reference from Bangladesh.
  • Religion, secularization, and modernity (Claims of Auguste de Comte, Karl Henrich Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber)
  • Contemporary challenges to the secularization thesis
  • The rise of civil and political religions
  • The revival of religion and the resurgence of fundamentalism
  • The religious resurgence in South Asia and particularly, in Bangladesh
10 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Global Movements, Transnational Religions
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain global movements in association with religion;
  • identify changing features of religions concerning changing social realities;
  • analyze the rise of religion in the global world, its connections with nationalism, fundamentalism, and othering processes.
  • Changing features of religions concerning changing social realities
  • Religious revitalization movements, the deterritorialization of religion, and the myth of specific religious traditions
  • Connections between the revival of religion and modern technology and meaning in the modern world (consumerism, nationalism, multiple modernities)
  • Terrorism, fundamentalism, and the ‘dangerous others’
  • The future of religion
8 hrs
Unit-7: Language and Religion
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the importance of language in religion;
  • identify major roles played by language in religion;
  • analyze sacred texts and religious ideology.
  • Language in religious settings
  • Sacred texts, language, and religious ideology
4 hrs
Unit-8: Religious Rituals
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different religious rituals;
  • identify specific roles played by rituals in religion and the supernatural;
  • analyze different dimensions of the importance of ritual studies.
  • Religious ritual and the expression of meaning
  • Rituals as sacred underwriting of religious ideology
  • Ritual influencing the supernatural
  • Ritual and social unity
  • Social inequality and the ritual of resistance
4 hrs
Unit-9: Religious Organizations
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different types of religious organizations;
  • identify the functions of religious organizations;
  • analyze and critically evaluate the functions of religious organizations in human society.
  • Religious organizations
  • Types, practices, and practitioners of religious organizations
4 hrs
Unit-10: Religion and Social Organization
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different types of social organization in association with religion;
  • identify the functions of different social organizations in religion;
  • analyze different dimensions of relations between religion and social organization, especially the establishment of the discourse of gender.
  • Religion and the political system- politics of development and the undervaluation of the popular religion
  • Religion and the economic system
  • Religion and gender- religious construction of gender, women as the ultimate victims of the battle between the extremists and developmentalists
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Crapo, Richley H.

2003 Anthropology of Religion. Boston, Mass: McGraw-Hill.

Lehmann, Arthur C., and James E. Myers, eds.

2001Magic, Witchcraft and Religion: An Anthropological Study of the Supernatural. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

Malefitj, Annemarie de Waal

1968 Religion and Culture: An Introduction to Anthropology of Religion. New York: The Macmillan Co.

Norbeck, Edward

1961 Religion in Primitive Societies. New York: Harper & Row.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Asad, Talal

1993 Genealogies of Religion: Discipline and Reasons of Power in Christianity and Islam. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.

Beckford, James A.

1987 New Religions: An Overview. In The Encyclopaedia of Religion 10. M. Eliade, ed. New York: MacMillan.

Bloch, M., and J. Parry

1982 Death and the Regeneration of Life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Boddy, Janice, and Michael Lambek, eds.

2013 A Companion to the Anthropology of Religion. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Durkheim, Emile

1915 [1976]. The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life. London: G. Allen & Unwin.

Evans-Pritchard, Edward Evan

1965 Theories of Primitive Religion. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Firth, Raymond

1996 Religion: A Humanist Interpretation. London: Routledge.

Geertz, Clifford

1973 The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic Books.

Gennep, Arnold van

1960 The Rites of Passage. London: RKP.

Hertz, R.

1960 Death and the Right Hand. London: Cohen and West.

Islam, Rafiul

2017   “Changing Beliefs and Practices among the Oraon Communities in the Barind Region of Bangladesh”, The Arts Faculty Journal, Vol. 7, Nos. 9, 10 & 11, Dhaka, Faculty of Arts, University of Dhaka, pp. 57-73.

Islam, Zahidul, and Mahmud, S.M. Arif

2010 Understanding Tribal Religion: A Case of Garo People in Bangladesh. In Soumyajit Patra (ed.), Rethinking Religion, Rawat Publications, Jaipur, India. ISBN: 81-316-0267-2.

Karen, Armstrong

2000 The Battle for God. New York: Ballantine Books.

Levi-Strauss, Claude

1963 Totemism. Boston: Beacon Press.

Levi-Strauss, Claude

1963 Structural Anthropology. New York: Basic Books.

Malinowski, Bronislaw Kasper

1954 [1948] The Role of Myth in Life. In Magic, Science and Religion. Garden City, New York: Anchor Books.

Moris, Brian

1987Anthropological Studies of Religion: An Introductory Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Said, Edward W.

1997 Covering Islam: How the Media and the Experts Determine how We See the Rest of the World. New York: Vintage Books.

Turner, Victor

1967 The Forest of Symbols: Aspects of Ndembu Ritual. London: Cornell University Press.

Turner, Victor

2008 [1969] The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure. London: Aldine Transaction.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 304: ETHNICITY, IDENTITY AND NATIONALISM

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course intends to familiarize students with the theories and concepts contested in the analysis of ethnicity, identity, and nationalism. It will enable them to explore how ethnic relations are being defined and perceived. These readings will be supplemented with empirical studies from developed and developing countries across different periods and exploring the historical and contemporary basis for their development and significance. Finally, it will guide students to the political and social implications of ethnic and national identification and solidarity both in the national and international arena.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Familiarize students with theories and concepts of ethnicity, identity, and nationalism;
  • Explore the ways ethnic relations are being defined and perceived;
  • Critically evaluate the political and social implications of ethnic and national identity;
  • Understand the impact of globalization on ethnic relations and nationalism.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Ethnic Classification- Us and Them
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of ethnicity, race, and nation;
  • identify basic features and core elements of ethnicity;
  • analyze ethnicity and minority groups in a plural and multicultural society.
  • Ethnicity, race, class, and nation
  • From tribe to an ethnic group
  • Indigenous people
  • Ethnicity and minority groups
  • Plural society, multiculturalism, and melting-pot metaphor
  • Ethnicity in history
  • Ethnicity, religion, and language; core elements of ethnicity
8 hrs
Unit-2:  Theories and Approaches of Ethnicity
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain major theories that examine ethnicity and politics behind its representation;
  • identify different approaches of ethnicity;
  • analyze the findings from different schools of ethnicity focusing on theoretical contributions from Weber, Geertz, Barth, and others.
  • Different approaches to ethnicity: primordialism and constructivism
  • Schools of ethnicity: Manchester school, Soviet ethnos school; subjective and objective conditions of ethnicity
  • Theoretical contributions: Max Weber, Clifford Geertz, Fredrik Barth, Abner Cohen, Paul R. Brass, Michael Hechter, Michael Banton
12 hrs
Unit-3: Issues of Identity
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of identity;
  • identify major aspects for the cultural construction of identity;
  • analyze the politics of identity formation with cross-cultural examples.
  • Fluidity, narrative self and social factors: identity as a process
  • The paradoxes of identity: where are the margins of the state
  • The cultural construction of ethnic and national identities
  • Ethnic identity and ideology; ethnic identity as stigma
  • Politics of identity formation
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: Nationalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of nationalism;
  • identify salient features of nationalism and nation-state;
  • analyze and compare nationalism as a cultural community and the history of its creation with theoretical understandings.
  • Nationalism and ethnicity reconsidered: the nation as modern vs. ethno symbolism; race to nation
  • The nation as a cultural community; nation-state; nationalism against the state
  • The nation as an imagined community: Benedict Anderson
  • The nation from history from below approach
  • Multicultural riddle in Western context; invented tradition: Eric Hobswam; nation and nationalism: Ernest Gellner
8 hrs
Unit-5: Selected Issues of Ethnicity, Identity, and Nationalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the ethnic conflict concerning nationalism;
  • identify major issues of ethnicity, identity, and nationalism;
  • analyze different aspects of ethnonational conflicts with an understanding of indigenous people’s movement and politics of ethnicity.
  • Prejudice and discrimination
  • Indigenous people’s movement
  • Religion and identity
  • Violence and identity
  • Ethnic conflict and nationalism: internal colonialism
  • Politics of ethnicity
  • Women, ethnicity, and nationalism
  • Ethno-national conflicts and international politics.
12 hrs
Unit-6: Transcending Ethnicity
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the context to the construction of civic nationalism;
  • identify salient features of multi-ethnic communities;
  • analyze postmodern perspectives of ethnicity, identity, and multiculturalism to evaluate ethnicity in the contemporary global world.
  • The End of Ethnic Identity and Nationalism: ethnic to civic nationalism
  • A multi-ethnic community without nationalism
  • The post-modern revival of ethnicity
  • Globalization and ethno-cultural differences; ethnicity, identity, and multiculturalism
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Anderson, Benedict

1991 [1983] Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso.

Banks, Marcus

1996Ethnicity: Anthropological Constructions. London and New York: Routledge.

Barth, Fredrik, ed.

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