BSS Coures

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 351: STRUCTURALISM AND POST-STRUCTURALISM

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course introduces the students with the foundations of structuralism and highlights the works of Levi-Struss. Then the national traditions of structuralism are looked in to. Next, it moves beyond structuralism and examines the works of Rolland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand how a system and its parts are interdependent terms;
  • Comprehend theoretical understandings relating to differences produce meaning;
  • Evaluate the historical development of structures and frameworks that allows people to communicate and understand each other.

 

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: The Classical Foundation of the Structuralist Mode of Thought
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the classical foundation of structuralism;
  • identify salient features of structuralism;
  • analyze the development of thoughts that implies how elements of human culture becoming meaning by way of their relationship to a broader, overarching system or structure.
  • French Rationalism: the views of Emile Durkheim, Marcell Mauss, Sigmund Freud and the like
4 hrs
Unit-2:  From Structural Linguistics to Structuralism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concept of semiology and the dimension of syntagmatic and paradigmatic axes of linguistic description;
  • identify basic features of phonology, morphology, and syntax;
  • analyze the function and structure of sound in a language.
  • Ferdinand de Saussure
  • Roman Osipovich Jakobson
  • Troubetzkoy and the like
8 hrs
Unit-3: The Structural View of ‘Culture’
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the structural view of culture;
  • identify major aspects of marriage, kinship, and myth from a structural perspective;
  • analyze and critically evaluate Levi-Strauss’s idea of the universal structure of the human mind.
  • Claude Levi-Strauss’ analysis of marriage, kinship, myth, classification, and totemism
8 hrs
Unit-4: National Tradition of Structuralism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain Dumotian thought of holism and hierarchy form the ideological basis of Indian society vs individualism and normative equality of Western societies;
  • identify major aspects of French, British, and American tradition of structuralism;
  • analyze the theories of the interaction of structure and agency.
  • French (Louis S. Dumont)
  • British (Edmund R. Leach, Mary Douglas)
  • American (Marshall Sahlins)
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Roland Barthes
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain Roland Barthes’ major works on structuralism;
  • identify values inserted through mythologies;
  • analyze structure as an ongoing process of continual change and reaction.
  • Early works (structuralism)
  • Later works (beyond structuralism)
4 hrs
Unit-6: The Post-structural Turn
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relationship between powerand knowledge and historical development of societal institutions;
  • identify various aspects of symbols with no constant and universal significance;
  • analyze methods of reflective attentiveness that discloses the individual’s lived experience.
  • Michel Foucault
  • Jacques Derrida
8 hrs
Unit-7: Breaking down the Distinction of Subjective and Objective
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the dynamics of power in society and how it is transferred, and social order is maintained;
  • identify major aspects of practice theory and theory of class distinction;
  • analyze the subject and objective distinctions.
  • Pierre Bourdieu
8 hrs
Unit-8: Popular Culture and Media Studies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the changing meaning of vocabulary used in the discussions of culture;
  • identify major findings of Williams and Hall on popular culture and media studies;
  • analyze reception theory and evaluate encoding and decoding philosophy.
  • Raymond Williams
  • Stuart Hall
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Barnard, Alan

2001History and Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Culler, Jonathan

1983 Rolland Barthes. London: Fontana.

Culler, Jonathan

1987 On Deconstruction. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Erickson, Paul A. and Liam D. Murphy, eds.

2001 Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Layton, Robert

1997 An Introduction to the Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Leach, Edmund

1996 Levi-Strauss. London: Fontana Press.

McGee R. J., and Richard L. Warms

2008 Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Melpas, Simon, and Paul Wake, eds.

2013 The Routledge Companion to Critical and Cultural Theory. New York: Routledge.

Morrison, Ken

2006 Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought. London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Ortner, Sherry B.

2001 Theory in Anthropology since the Sixties. In Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Erickson, Paul. A. and Liam D. Murphy, eds. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Sarup, Madan

1993 An Introductory Guide to Post-structuralism and Post-modernism. Hertfordshire: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Simons, Jon, ed.

2004 Contemporary Critical Theories. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Smith, Philip

2001 Cultural Theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

Upadhay, V.S., and Gaya Pandey

1993 History of Anthropological Thought. New Delhi: Concept Publishing Company.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Barthes, Rolland

1973 Mythologies. St Albans: Paladin.

Barthes, Rolland

1975 [1973] The Pleasure of the Text. New York: Hill and Wang.

Baudrillard, Jean

1998 [1970] The Consumer Society. London: Sage Publications.

Bourdieu, Pierre

1993 The Field of Cultural Production. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Derrida, Jacques

1976 Of Grammatology. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.

Douglas, Mary

1966 Purity and Danger. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Dumont, Louis

1972 Homo Hierarchicus: The Caste System and Its Implications. London: Pladian.

Durkheim, Emile, and Marcel Mauss

1963 [1903] Primitive Classification. Translated by Rodney Needham. London: Cohen and West.

Eco, Umberto

1994 The Role of the Reader. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Eribon, Didler

1991 Michel Foucault. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Foucault, Michel

1972 [1969] The Archaeology of Knowledge. London: Tavistock.

Gurevitch, Michael, with Tony Bennett, James Curranand and Janet Woollacott, eds.

1980 Culture, Society and the Media. London: Methuen.

Hall, Stuart, with Dorothy Hobson, Andrew Lowe and Paul Willis, eds.

1980 Culture, Media, Language. London: Unwin Hyman.

Levi-Strauss, Claude

1952 Social Structure. In Anthropology Today. Alfred Louis Kroeber, ed. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Levi-Strauss, Claude

1963 Structural Anthropology Vol:I. C. Jacobson and B. G. Schoepf, trans. New York : Basic Books.

Levi-Strauss, Claude

1966 The Savage Mind. Anonymous, trans. London: Weidenfield and Nicolson.

Levi-Strauss, Claude

1970 The Raw and the Cooked: Introduction to a Science of Mythology. London: Cape.

Levi-Strauss, Claude

1969 The Elementary Structures of Kinship. J. H. Bell and J. R. Von Sturmer, trans. London: Eyre and Spottiswoode.

Rabinow, Paul, ed.

1984 The Foucault Reader. New York: The Pantheon Books.

Williams, Raymond

1971 Culture and Society. London: Penguin.

 

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 352: GENDER AND SOCIETY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course focuses on the conceptual and theoretical issues related to gender and discusses them in the light of current intellectual trends of anthropology. The course is designed to provide a deeper understanding of the categories of sex, gender, and sexuality from cross-cultural perspectives. It explores how these categories intersect with other categories of social and cultural diversity such as race, ethnicity, class, and age. Throughout different sections of the course, it has a detailed discussion on the constructions of such categories in the light of historical and global processes such as colonialism, nationalism, the international division of labor, and global economic transformation.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Cross-cultural understanding of the concepts sex, gender, and sexuality;
  • Critically examine the categories such as race, ethnicity, class, and age interest;
  • Analyze historical processes such as colonialism, nationalism, the international division of labor, and global economic transformation with the development of social categories.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: The Concept of Gender in Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different concepts of gender in anthropology;
  • identify salient features of the cultural constructions of masculinity and femininity;
  • analyze concepts related to sex and gender observed, performed, and understood in any given society.
  • Cultural constructions of masculinity and femininity
  • Gender symbols and sexual stereotypes
  • Culturally assigned roles and gender status
Unit-2:  A Critical Look on the Study of Gender from Anthropological Perspectives
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the ideas dealing with women’s issues in anthropology;
  • identify major aspects of the idea of representation of women in ethnographic research;
  • analyze the homogeneous and monolithic understanding of women cross-culturally.
  • Male bias, western bias, and representation of women in ethnographic research
  • The idea of ‘muted group’, and ghettoization in dealing with women’s issues in anthropology
8 hrs
Unit-3: Power and Gender Relations
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain power and gender relations with anthropological perspectives;
  • identify major aspects of male-female relationships in politics, religion, and kinship;
  • analyze how gender relations intersect with relations of power.
  • Male-female relationships in politics, religion, and kinship
4 hrs
Unit-4: Concepts and Issues in Body Politics
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts and issues in body politics;
  • identify major aspects of women in body politics;
  • analyze the process of subjecting the female body to systemic regimes of regulation.
  • Reproductive rights and motherhood
  • Women in media
  • Women in literature
  • Prostitution
  • Women and violence
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Global Economic Transformation, Division of Labor and the Issue of Gender
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the transformation in the gender division of labor and its relationship with changing economic activities of societies;
  • identify gender position in global economic transformation and division of labor;
  • analyze the feminization of the global labor force and devaluation of women’s labor.
  • Colonialism, migration, and feminization of subsistence agriculture
  • Effects of capitalism on women
  • Women’s role in petty commodity production and factories and the idea of ‘docile’ labor
8 hrs
Unit-6: Gender, Identity and Sexuality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain concepts related to gender, identity, and sexuality;
  • identify major aspects of contemporary queer movement and gay rights as human rights;
  • analyze the discourses of identity-based on sexuality.
  • Transvestite lives- transgender and trans-sexualism, sex tourism and female sexual slavery/sex work
  • Debates on same-sex marriage, sexism, racism, and violence against women
8 hrs
Unit-7: Women and the Issue of Representation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain issues of women representation;
  • identify basic ideas of culturalist and structuralist perspectives focusing representation of women;
  • analyze the debates of multicultural feminist perspectives against cultural imperialism.
  • Culturalist vs structuralist (the debates on the veil, female genital mutilation)
8 hrs
Unit-8: Gender Planning and Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain gender planning and development;
  • identify basic features of WID, WAD, and GAD;

analyze and critically evaluate how women’s issues are integrated into development planning cross-culturally.

  • WID, WAD and GAD- critical review of global, regional and national situations
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Abu-Lughod, Lila

1993 Writing Women’s Worlds: Bedouin Stories. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Leonardo, Micaela Di, eds.

1991 Gender at Cross Roads of Knowledge: Feminist Anthropology in the Post-modern Era. Berkeley: University of California Press.

MacCormack, Carol P., and Marilyn Starthern, eds.

1998 [1980] Nature, Culture and Gender. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Mohanty, Chandra Talpade, with Ann Russo and Lourdes Torres, eds.

1991 Third World Women and the Politics of Feminism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Moore, Henrietta

1988 Feminism and Anthropology. Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press.

Rosaldo, Michelle, with Louise Lamphere and Joan Bamberger, eds.

1974 Women, Culture and Society. California: Stanford University Press.

Tong, Rosemarie

1989 Feminist Thought: A Comprehensive Introduction. Boulder (Colorado) and San Francisco: Westview Press.

White, Sarah

1992 Arguing with the Crocodiles: Gender and Class in Bangladesh. London: Zed Books.

Ward, Martha C.

1999 A World Full of Women. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Boserup, Ester

1989 Women’s Role in Economic Development. London: Earthscan.

Foucault, Michel

1984 The History of Sexuality: An Introduction. R. Hurley, trans. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Islam, Rafiul

2010   “Some Observations on Status of Women among the Santal Communities in Bangladesh”, Grassroots Voice: A Journal of Indigenous Knowledge and Development, Vol. VII, Issue I, Dhaka: Bangladesh Resource Centre for Indigenous Knowledge, pp. 52-57, <http://www.thefinancialexpress-bd.com/2017/07/04/75910>.

Islam, Rafiul

2018 “The Status of Women of Oraon Community in Northwest Bangladesh: An Anthropological Observation”, Man and Culture, Vol. 4, No. 1, Rajshahi: Institute of Social Research and Applied Anthropology, pp. 1-18.

Nalini, Visvanathan, eds.

1997 The Women, Gender and Development Reader. Dhaka: University Press Limited.

Ortner, Sherry B., and H. Whitehead, eds.

1981 Sexual Meaning: The Cultural Construction of Gender and Sexuality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Schneir, Miriam, ed.

1995 The Vintage Book of Feminism: The Essential Writing of the Contemporary Women’s Movement. New York: Vintage Book.

Strathern, Marilyn

1992 Reproducing the Future: Anthropology, Kinship and the New Reproductive Technologies. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 353: LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course introduces the students with how linguistics has influenced the field of anthropology and has provided theories and methods used in the analysis of humankind concerning culture. This will also highlight linguistics anthropology’s discovery through cross-cultural fieldwork that many existing non-western languages had no scripts. This will explore new areas of research including the relationship between nationalism and languages, the role of languages in mass media, and politics.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Explain the phenomena of fast disappearance of languages in local and global perspectives;
  • Critically evaluate the globalization of language and culture;
  • Explain the relationship between nationalism and languages;
  • Understand the role of languages in mass media and politics.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Anthropological Linguistics
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical development of linguistic anthropology;
  • identify major aspects of phonetic transcription and descriptive linguistics;
  • analyze the importance of language in its wider social and cultural context and the role of language in making and maintaining cultural practices and societal structures.
  • Phonetic transcription and phonetic analysis; morphology and syntax
  • Descriptive linguistics; emic and etic

Structural linguistics, langue, and parole

8 hrs
Unit-2:  Structuralism and Transformationalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the structural analysis of language
  • identify “binary distinctive features” of language as a foundational element for understanding the process of differentiation;
  • analyze how languages having the same deep structure may differ from each other in surface structure because of the application of different rules for transformations, pronunciation, and word insertion.
  • Roman Jakobson’s distinctive features
  • Claude Levi-Strauss
  • Noam Chomsky’s Transformational or Generative Grammar
  • The new cultural anthropology in cultures’ ideational code
  • Formal and substantive linguistics
12 hrs
Unit-3: Comparative Methods in Linguistics
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the comparative methods in linguistics;
  • identify different classifications of language;
  • analyze the process of performing a feature-by-feature comparison of two or more languages.
  • Synchronic vs diachronic studies in language and culture
  • Classifications: genetic classification, areal classification; typological classification: lexicostatistics and glottochronology
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: Language and Culture
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain concepts related to language and culture;
  • identify basic features of ethno-science and language analysis
  • analyze and critically evaluate the ways culture is shaped in everyday practices below the threshold of awareness.
  • World view problem, language, and thoughts
  • Ethno-science: ethno-scientific method
  • Componential analysis, basic color terms, and semantic analysis, semantics
  • New development in the study of language and mind
12 hrs
Unit-5: Socio-Linguistics
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain concepts of socio-linguistics;
  • identify basic features of the methodology of socio-linguistics;
  • analyze societies’ effects on language and how it is used, in the form of a speech community, high prestige, low prestige varieties, and societal networks.
  • The methodology of socio-linguistics, bilingualism, multilingualism
  • Diglossia and code-switching: social dialects, elaborated and restricted codes and oral literature
  • Rules in socio-linguistics
12 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Chomsky, Noam

1957 Syntactic Structures. The Hague: Mouton.

Duranti, Alsandro

1998 Linguistic Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Foley, W. A.

1997Anthropological Linguistics: An Introduction. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell publishers.

Hickerson, Nancy Parrott

2000 Linguistic Anthropology. New York: Harcourt College Publishers.

Salzmann, Zdenek

1998 Language, Culture, and Society: An Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology. Boulder: Westview Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Eastman, Carol M.

1972 Aspects of Language and Culture. San Francisco: Chandler Sharp Publisher Inc.

Lakolt, Robin Tiomach

1990 The Politics of Language in Our Lives. New York: Basic Books.

Philips, Susan U., with Susan Steele and Christine Tanz, eds.

1987 Language, Gender and Sex in Comparative Perspective. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Romaine, Suzanne

2000 Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics. New York: Oxford University Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 354: APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course introduces students with the application of anthropological knowledge, methodology, and theoretical approaches to address contemporary human problems. It will focus on the associated ethical issues and practical constraints and obstacles encountered by anthropologists when conducting applied research. Special attention will be given for reviewing cases in the major domains of applied anthropology, to understand how people can make their training in anthropology work in the fields of agriculture, education, health and medicine, business and industry, environment, tourism, development, etc.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the basic issues of applied anthropology;
  • Analyze theory, methods, and ethical issues for applied research;
  • Discuss major domains and cases of applied anthropological research;
  • Analyze case studies from applied fields in anthropology.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Orientations of Applied Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of applied anthropology;
  • identify major features of applied anthropology;
  • analyze the significance of applied anthropology for anthropological theory
  • Definition and scope of applied anthropology
  • Relationship between academic and applied anthropology
  • Debates regarding the distinction made between them
2 hrs
Unit-2:  Context of the Emergence of Applied Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the contexts of the emergence of applied anthropology;
  • identify major actors responsible for the emergence of applied anthropology;
  • analyze and critically discuss the linkages of applied anthropology and colonialism.
  • Colonialism- the role of the American Anthropological Association (AAA)
4 hrs
Unit-3: Methods and Policy
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the appropriate methods for applied research and the bottom-up approach;
  • identify major processes for action research with examples;
  • analyze anthropology’s possible roles in policy formulation
  • Overview of applied research
  • Anthropology and participatory approaches – PRA, RRA, PAR, PLA, FGD
  • The Fox project and others
  • Policy, culture, and theory- public policy as a new field in applied anthropology
  • New directions in practicing applied anthropology
4 hrs
Unit-4: The Role of Applied Anthropologists
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the distinctive roles of applied anthropologists;
  • identify focused issues of applied anthropologists;
  • analyze anthropological methods and tools of research used as consultants to solve real-world problems and issues.
  • Anthropologists as advocates, as change agents, as consultants, and so on
4 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Monitoring and Evaluation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of monitoring and evaluation;
  • identify qualitative and quantitative tools for monitoring and evaluation;
  • analyze anthropologists’ role
  • for improving performance and assess the results of programs set up by governments, international organizations, and NGOs.
  • Teamwork in a multi-disciplinary context
  • Qualitative and quantitative approaches and tools commonly used
2 hrs
Unit-6: Report Writing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of report writing;
  • identify major areas of report writing;
  • analyze and organize a research project and present findings through narratives and reports.
  • Collecting, recording, and organizing information
  • Writing and revising the first draft
  • Final presentation
4 hrs
Unit-7: Application of Anthropological Knowledge
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the roles of applied anthropologists to address the problems of contemporary issues;
  • identify the actions and roles played by different branches of anthropology;

analyze the relevance of anthropology in the globalized world.

  • Contemporary human problems – economic growth, social inequality, environmental degradation, sustainability
  • Case reviews in association with urban anthropology, medical anthropology, environmental anthropology, development anthropology, anthropology and education, business and industrial anthropology, tourism research, and applied anthropology
  • Anthropology and globalization
6 hrs
Unit-8: Applied Anthropology in Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the roles of applied anthropologists in the context of Bangladesh;
  • identify the scope of applied anthropology in Bangladesh;
  • analyze contemporary trends and significances of applied anthropology in Bangladesh with case studies.
  • Scope of application
  • Contemporary trends and significance
2 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Alam, Nurul S. M.

2002 Contemporary Anthropology: Theory and Practice. Dhaka: University Press Limited.

Chambers, Robert

1989 Applied Anthropology: A Practical Guide. Illinois: Waveland Press.

Ervin, Alexander M.

2006 Applied Anthropology: Tools and Perspectives for Contemporary Practice. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Hemment, Julie

2007 Public Anthropology and the Paradoxes of Participation: Participatory Action Research and Critical Ethnography in Provincial Russia. Human Organization 66(3):301-314.

McDonald, James H.

2002 The Applied Anthropology Reader. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Shore, C., and S. Wright

1997 Policy: A New Field of Anthropology. In Anthropology of policy: critical perspectives on governance and power. C. Shore and S. Wright, eds. Pp.3-39. London: Routledge.

Sillitoe, Paul

2007 Anthropologists Only Need Apply: Challenges of Applied Anthropology. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (N.S.) 13:147-165.

ADDITIONAL TEXT  

Bodley, John

2003 Anthropology and Global Environmental Change. In Encyclopedia of Global Environment: Social and Economic Dimensions of Global Environmental Change, Peter Timmerman, ed. London: Wiley.

Checker, Melissa

2007 “But I Know It’s True”: Environmental Risk Assessment, Justice, and Anthropology. Human Organization 66(2):112-124.

Clay, Patricia, and Julia Olson

2007 Defining Fishing Communities: Issues in Theory and Practice. NAPA Bulletin 28:27-42.

Curtis, Fred

2003 Eco-localism and Sustainability. Ecological Economics 46:83-102.

Farmer, Paul

1990 Sending Sickness: Sorcery, Politics, and Changing Concepts of AIDS in Rural Haiti. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 4(1):6-27.

Islam, Rafiul

2010, “Socio-Economic Problems of Santals and Oraons: A Plea for Ethnic Community Development in the Barind Region of Bangladesh”, The Dhaka University Studies: Journal of the Faculty of Arts, Vol. 67, No. 1, Dhaka: University of Dhaka, pp. 117-124.

Kedia, Satish

2008 Recent Changes and Trends in the Practice of Applied Anthropology. NAPA Bulletin 29: 14-28.

Lamphere, Louise

2004 The Convergence of Applied, Practicing, and Public Anthropology in the 21st Century. Human Organization 63(4):431-443.

Sharpe, M. E.

2003 Introduction: Imperia and the Power of Scale. In The Power of Scale: A Global History Approach, Pp.3-26.

Smith, Valene L.

2005 Anthropology in the Tourism Workplace. NAPA Bulletin 23.

Sol, Tax

1975 Action Anthropology. Current Anthropology 16:514-517.

Wallace, Tim

2005 Tourism, Tourists, and Anthropologists at Work. NAPA Bulletin 23:1-26.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 355: ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELDWORK AND VIVA-VOCE

CREDIT HOURS: 2 (TWO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to engage students in the field taking experiences gathered from the first and second year of fieldwork. This course will provide an approach to common concepts and methodologies in anthropology relating to ethnographic fieldwork. Students will be able to apply their theoretical and methodological understandings in the field with the people, society, and culture and write a fieldwork report.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Obtain practical orientation to the procedures of field research;
  • Understand the procedures followed to conduct fieldwork;
  • Gain the ability to relate their theoretical and methodological understandings with the practical situation of the people, society, and culture.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction: ‘Field’ and ‘Fieldwork’ in Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of field and fieldwork in anthropology;
  • identify various aspects of fieldwork in anthropology;
  • analyze and critically discuss the current debates of fieldwork.
  • Meaning of field in anthropology
  • Features of fieldwork in anthropology
  • Pre-fieldwork planning to post fieldwork representation of data;
  • Subjectivity, reflexivity, and fieldwork relationship
  • Ethical challenges and ways of addressing these challenges
2 hrs
Unit-2: Fieldwork Issues
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain anthropological knowledge for ethnographic fieldwork of different issues;
  • identify different problems faced by people in society;
  • analyze the learning from the field.
  • Livelihood in rural and urban societies and migration
  • Community, consumption, and economy
  • Basic human rights
  • Ecology, environment and sustainable development
  • People of different cultures and ethnic origins
  • Exploration of livelihood
  • Understanding social institutions and the community
  • Kinship, gender, and social issues
  • Climate change, disaster, and development
  • Anthropological study of every aspect of human being, society, culture, economy, and politics
  • Subjectivity, reflexivity, and fieldwork relationship
  • Ethical challenges and ways of addressing these challenges
  • Issues related to medical anthropology
2 hrs
Unit-3: Conducting Fieldwork
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain fieldwork planning in connection with fieldwork issues;
  • identify salient features of the community studied in the field;
  • analyze and learn to utilize theoretical and methodological understandings to organize fieldwork.
Unit-4: Presentation of Field Data and Report Writing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain data from the field and fieldwork experiences;
  • identify the strengths and weaknesses of the fieldwork;
  • analyze and critically discuss the field situation based on data obtained from the field.
  • The process of data generation
  • Tabulation and summarization
  • Data analysis
  • Presentation of the findings
  • Fieldwork report writing following guidelines
2 hrs
Unit-5: Oral Test (Viva-voce)
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain and communicate effectively on the topics covered by the courses and fieldwork;
  • identify major findings from the fieldwork;
  • analyze and apply reflective analysis to theoretical and applied contexts.
  • Oral defense on the findings from the field
  • Learning from different courses
2 hrs

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Fieldwork report, Oral test (viva-voce).

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Bernard, Harvey Russell

2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.

Fetterman, D. M.

2009 Ethnography: Step-by-step (Vol. 17). Sage Publications.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Bryman, Alan, ed.

2001 Ethnography (4 Volumes). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

Gusterson, Hugh. ed.

2008 Ethnographic Research. In A Pluralist Guide to Qualitative Methods in International Relations. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 115-142.

Clifford, James

1983 On Ethnographic Authority. Representations 1, pp. 118-146.

Bourgois, Philippe

1990 Confronting Anthropological Ethics: Ethnographic Lessons from Central America. Journal of Peace Research 27, pp 43-54.

Warren, Kay B. ed.

2001 Telling Truths. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 198-218.

Montejo, Victor D. ed.

2001 Truth, Human Rights, and Representation. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 372-91.