BSS Coures

5.7 FOURTH YEAR 7TH SEMESTER BSS (HONORS)

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 401: INTERPRETIVIST, POSTMODERN AND EARLY FEMINIST SCHOOLS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course deals with major theoretical shifts that occurred in anthropology since the 1970s and onward. Among them, feminism is noteworthy because of its critique of science as well as its portraying of male bias across the disciplines. A large portion of feminist works and theories will be offered in this course, covering the areas of ‘anthropology of women’, anthropology and gender’ and ‘feminism and anthropology’. In addition to this, interpretivism and postmodernism will also be taken in to account since many of their concerns and suggestions overlap with feminism.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand theoretical approaches commonly regarded as anti-scientific;
  • explain classical orientations and works of early social scientists;
  • focus on the approaches of interpretive, post-modern, and early feminist anthropologists.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Classical Base of Hermeneutic & Interpretivism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the conceptual clarification of Hermeneutic;
  • identify major aspects of the classical base of Hermeneutic and Interpretivism;
  • analyze the significance of origin and development of Hermeneutic and Interpretivism.
  • Meaning and definition of Hermeneutic and Interpretivism
4 hrs
Unit-2: Social Scientists Advocating Hermeneutics
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the role of social scientists in advocating Hermeneutics;
  • identify major contributions of Weber, Radin, and Evans-Pritchard on Hermeneutics;
  • analyze and critically discuss the ideas of Weber, Radin, and Evans-Pritchard in advocating Hermeneutics.
  • Max Weber
  • Paul Radin
  • Edward Evan Evans-Pritchard
8 hrs
Unit-3: The Rise of Interpretive School of Thought
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the contexts to the rise interpretive school of thought;
  • identify the ideas of Geertz, Kessing, and Roseberry on interpretivism;
  • analyze the interpretive turn in anthropology.
  • Clifford Geertz
  • Roger Keesing
  • William Roseberry
8 hrs
Unit-4: The Postmodern Turn
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the origin of postmodernism in Western thought;
  • identify major aspects of their society from a post-modernist perspective;
  • analyze the relationship between postmodernism and post-industrialism and evaluate the contributions of Nietzsche, Recour, Leyotard, Baudrillard, and Bell.
  • Friedrich Nietzsche and Paul Recour (classical base)
  • Jean Francois Leyotard, Jean Baudrillard and Daniel Bell
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: The ‘Writing Culture Group’
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the rise of postmodernism in anthropology through Writing Culture Group;
  • identify major relations among ethnographic fieldwork, epistemology, and ontology;
  • analyze the idea of partial truth, the critique of anthropological objectivity, and literary turn in anthropology to justify anthropology as a science or art.
  • Postmodernism and anthropology
4 hrs
Unit-6: The Neo-Marxist Critique of Postmodernism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the Neo-Marxist critique of postmodernism;
  • identify major areas covered by neo-Marxism in the critique of postmodernism;
  • analyze the productive tension between Marxism and postmodernism.
  • Fredric Jameson
  • David Harvey
  • Scott Lash
8 hrs
Unit-7: Feminism and Anthropology: Early Writings of Women Anthropologists
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical relation between anthropology and feminism;
  • identify the androcentric bias in anthropological construction of culture;
  • analyze the rise of reflexivity in ethnographic writings and the feminist turn in anthropology.
  • Margaret Mead
  • Ruth Benedict
  • Laura Bohannan
  • Weinner and the like
  • Issues of “male bias” in anthropological writing-reflexivity in the fieldwork
8 hrs
Unit-8: Feminist Anthropological Theories
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain feminist schools like structural and Marxist feminism;
  • identify the impact Marxist feminism on anthropology;
  • analyze nature-culture debate and critically examine Marxism and feminist anthropology.
  • Structural and Marxist feminist anthropologists- Sherry Ortner, Eleanor Leacock
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Barnard, Alan

2001 History and Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Barnerd, H. Russel, ed.

1998 Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Walnut Creek: Altamira Press.

Erickson, Paul A. and Liam D. Murphy, eds.

2001 Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Layton, Robert

1997 An Introduction to the Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

McGee R. J., and Richard L. Warms

2008 Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Morrison, Ken

2006 Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought. London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Moore, Henriata, ed.

1999 Anthropological Theory Today. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Moore, Henriata

1988 Feminism and Anthropology: Feminist Perspectives. New York: Wiley.

Ortner, Sherry B.

2001 Theory in Anthropology since the Sixties. In Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory. Erickson, Paul. A. and Liam D. Murphy, eds. Ontario: Broadview Press.

Ortner, Sherry B.

2006 Anthropology and Social Theory. Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Ortner, Sherry B., and Harriet Whitehead, eds.

1981 Sexual Meanings: The Cultural Construction of Gender and Sexuality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sarup, Madan

1993 An Introductory Guide to Post-structuralism and Post-modernism. Hertfordshire: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Simons, Jon, ed.

2004 Contemporary Critical Theories. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Smith, Philip

2001 Cultural Theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Bell, Daniel

1973 The Coming of Post-Industrial Society. New York: Basic Books.

Bell, Daniel

1976 The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism. New York: Basic Books.

Butler, Judith

1990 Gender Trouble. London: Routledge.

Butler, Judith

1997 The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Callinicos, Alex

1989 Against Post-modernism: A Marxist Critique. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Clifford, James

1988 The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth Century Ethnography, Literature and Art. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Crane, Diana

1992 The Production of Culture. Newbury Park: Sage.

Fardon, Richard

1999 Mary Douglas: An Intellectual Biography. London and New York: Routledge.

Geertz, Clifford

1975 The Interpretation of Cultures. London: Hutchinson.

Giddens, Anthony

1991 Modernity and Self-Identity. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Harvey, David

1989 The Condition of Post-modernity: An Enquiry in to the Origins of Cultural Change. Oxford: Blackwell.

Jameson, Fredric

1984 Postmodernism or the Cultural logic of Late Capitalism? New Left Review 46:53-92.

Lash, Scott, and John Urry

1993 Economies of Signs and Spaces. London: Sage.

Lash, Scott, and John Urry

1987 The End of Organized Capitalism. Madison: The University of Wisconcin Press.

Lyotard, Jean- Francois

1984 [1979] The Post-modern Condition. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Seidman, Steven

1994 The Postmodern Turn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wolff, Janet

1993 The Social Production of Art. London: Macmillan.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 402: RESEARCH METHODS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course aims to teach students some of the basic kinds of qualitative analysis and academic writing. In addition to this, common methodological issues and debates are introduced. This course explores the traditions and central issues in anthropological research. Qualitative analysis and experimentation of different kinds, triangulation, procedures of research, and issues involved in writing are also focused on this course.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the importance of qualitative research methods in anthropology;
  • explore common methodological issues and debates;
  • understand the traditions and central issues in anthropological research;
  • examine different experiments, triangulation, procedures of research, and issues involved in writing.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Research Traditions and Central Issues in Anthropological Research
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain philosophical underpinnings of anthropological research and how anthropological research is epistemologically grounded into these philosophical traditions;
  • identify the importance of ethical clearance in anthropological research;
  • analyze reflexivity and inter-subjectivity in ethnographic writings.
  • Research traditions – positivism, empiricism, rationalism, humanism, hermeneutics, and phenomenology
  • Grounded theory
  • Ethical issues, reflexivity, and inter-subjectivity
4 hrs
Unit-2: Debates with Regard to ‘Objectivity’
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain major debates on objectivity in anthropological research and how the ideas of ‘field’ and ‘fieldwork’ has been changed in contemporary anthropology;
  • identify basic aspects of fieldwork and ethnography;
  • analyze the immersion of ethnographer in the name of a participant observer.
  • Field and fieldwork
  • Detached observer
  • Producing ethnography and so on
8 hrs
Unit-3: Qualitative Data Analysis
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain qualitative data analysis methods like an ethnographic, case study, life history, oral history, autobiographical, archival, and narrative analysis;
  • identify the similarities and differences of different data analysis procedures;
  • analyze the significance and application of qualitative data analysis procedures in anthropological research;
  • Ethnographic analysis, analysis of case study, life history, oral history, autobiographical material, archival material, and narratives
  • Comparative/ cross-cultural analysis, ethno-methodology, thick description, and network analysis
  • Analysis of cultural domains: taxonomy and decision modeling
8 hrs
Unit-4: Experimentation in Anthropology
At the end of this unit students will be able to-

  • explain different types of experiment in anthropological research;
  • identify the differences between the experiment in the lab and experiment in the field;
  • analyze the relation between experiment and ethical issues in anthropological research.
  • Logic of experimentation
  • Experiments in – lab and field
  • Natural experiments, naturalistic experiments, comparative field experiments, ethics and experiment
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Triangulation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the idea of triangulation;
  • identify major aspects of triangulation;
  • analyze the significance of integration between qualitative and quantitative approaches in anthropological research.
  • Integration of qualitative and quantitative approaches
4 hrs
Unit-6: Issues of Ethnographic Writing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain ethnography as a writing genre;
  • identify the status of ‘fact’ in ethnographic writings;
  • analyze that ethnography is not exclusively based on fact, and the boundary between fact and fiction is blurred.
  • Changing styles of ethnographic writing
  • Ethnography as a fiction
8 hrs
Unit-7: Procedures of Research
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of doing research;
  • identify a research topic, research site, and data collection techniques;
  • analyze the procedures to write a research monograph after the fieldwork, write the main body and arguments of the monograph, and write a reference, citation and bibliography, footnote, and endnote as hands-on experience.
  • Preparation for research: choosing a topic, searching the literature, designing research, learning the language, contacting with the gatekeeper, and scheduling research
  • Phases of research: selecting a research problem, writing the proposal, developing checklist/ constructing questionnaire, conducting archival research/ fieldwork, documenting data, coding, and decoding, measuring variables, translating field notes and texts, database management, analyzing data, and presenting the findings
  • Writing reports and monographs: writing introduction, the main body and conclusion; rules of citation, notes, and footnotes, and bibliography
8 hrs
Unit-8: Computer-Assisted Analysis
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of computer-assisted analysis;
  • identify major aspects of qualitative and quantitative equipment for computer-assisted analysis;
  • analyze the importance of computer-assisted analysis in anthropological research with examples.
  • Qualitative data – Atlas TI, NVIVO, decision explorer, Anthropac, Ethnograph, and the like
  • Quantitative data – MS Excel, MS Access, SPSS, STATA, EPI, and the like
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Bailey, Stephen

2001 Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. London and New York: Routledge.

Barnard, Alan, and Jonathan Spencer

1992 International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences. New York: Macmillan.

Bernard, Russell

2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.

Bernard, Russell, ed.

1998 Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Walnut Creek: Altamira Press.

Briggs, Charles L.

1986 Learning How to Ask: A Sociolinguistic Appraisal of the Role of Interview in Social Science Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dick, Hobbs, and Richards Wright, eds.

2006 The Sage Handbook of Fieldwork. London: Sage Publications.

Ellen, R. F.

1984 Ethnographic Research. London: Academic Press.

Jackson, Anthony, ed.

1987 Anthropology at Home. London and New York: Tavistock Publications.

 

ADDITIONAL TEXT 

Bryman, Alan, ed.

2001 Ethnography (4 Volumes). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

Denjin, Norman K, and Yvonna S. Linclon, eds.

2001 The American Tradition in Qualitative Research. London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 403: INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course introduces the students to the main concepts and theories of globalization. It will help them to examine the diverse range of economic, social, political, cultural, and environmental issues encompassed by the globalization debate and to explore their impacts on contemporary society, culture, and environment.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the importance of the anthropological approach to globalization debate;
  • examine the discourse and debate of globalization;
  • identify the contemporary issues relating to globalization in Bangladesh.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: The Idea of Globalization
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of globalization;
  • identify major features of globalization
  • analyze globalization from historical, economic, and anthropological perspectives.
  • Historical, economic, and anthropological perspectives
4 hrs
Unit-2: Debate on Global vs. Local and Tradition vs. Modern
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the global-local and tradition-modern debates;
  • identify the role of IMF, WB, ADB for spreading globalization;
  • analyze how development should be understood from the below and trickle-down theory.
  • The role of the World Bank, ADB, IMF, and other international organizations and MNCs
  • ‘Trickle-down’ or ‘development from below’ approaches
4 hrs
Unit-3: Globalization and Neo-liberalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain globalization and neo-liberalism;
  • identify the connection between globalization and neoliberalism;
  • analyze the counter-hegemonic movements around the world.
  • Anti-globalization
  • Counter- globalization
4 hrs
Unit-4: Globalization and Contestation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the anti-globalization movement;
  • identify major features of the anti-globalization movement around the world;
  • analyze and critically examine the role of the anti-globalization movement for changing society.
  • Anti-globalization movement – Antonio Gramsci, Ernesto Laclau, Vandana Shiva, Arundhuti Roy, Noam Chomsky, Pierre Bourdieu, and others
8 hrs
Unit-5: Globalization as Cultural Transformation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the cultural dimension of globalization;
  • identify major arguments of Appadurai on globalization;
  • analyze the ‘scape theory’ of Appadurai and global flow.
  • Perspective: globalizing ideas, production, people, technology, media, and finance
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Global Governance and its Impact on National Societies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the idea of governance linked with globalization;
  • identify major areas of global governance and its impact on nation-states;
  • analyze some selected case studies cross-culturally.
  • Selected case studies
4 hrs
Unit-7: Globalization and Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how globalization is related to development;
  • identify the differences between developed and developing countries;
  • analyze the benefits of globalization and development globally, nationally, and locally.
  • Developed vs. developing countries – who gets what
Unit-8: Globalization and its Environmental Impacts
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the changes in the environment due to globalization
  • identify major facts responsible for the changes in the environment with examples;
  • analyze the history and significance of the ecofeminist Chipko movement and some environmental changes in Bangladesh due to shrimp farming in the coastal area and the Rampal power plant near the Sundarbans
  • The case of GMO farming and Chipko movements in India
  • Shrimp farming in the coastal areas of Bangladesh
  • Rampal Power Generation Project Near Sundarbans
8 hrs
Unit-9: Placing Bangladesh in the Globalized World
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the green revolution and RMG sector in Bangladesh;
  • identify major aspects of food culture cross-culturally;
  • analyze globalizing cultures and the Bangladesh context.
  • The case of the green revolution
  • Development of the RMG sector
  • Overseas migration
  • Globalizing food (Bangladeshi/Indian food in the UK and Foreign Restaurant and Fast Food Outlets in Bangladesh)
  • Globalizing culture and others
8 hrs
Unit-10: Globalization and Tourism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain tourism in the context of globalization;
  • identify basic aspects of human rights movements;
  • analyze how globalization promotes tourism and its impact on indigenous communities around the world and in Bangladesh.
  • Indigenous communities and human rights movements
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Beck, Ulrich

1999 What is Globalization? Cambridge: Polity Press.

Eriksen, Thomas Hylland, ed.

2003 Globalization: Studies in Anthropology. London: Pluto Press.

Held, David, with Anthony McGrew, David Goldblatt, and Johnathan Perraton

1999 Global Transformations: Politics, Economics and Culture. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Held, David, and Anthony McGrew, eds.

2003 The Global Transformation Reader. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Held, David, and Anthony McGrew

2007 Globalization/Anti-Globalization: Beyond the Great Divide. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Inda, Jonathan Xavier, and Renato Rosaldo, eds.

2003 Anthropology of Globalization: A Reader. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Lewellen, Ted C.

2002 The Anthropology of Globalization: Cultural Anthropology Enters the 21st Century. Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc.

McGrew, Anthony, ed.

2003 Globalization Theory: Approaches and Controversies. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Shiva, Vandana

2002 Seeds of Suicide: The Ecological and Human Cost of Globalization of Agriculture. Zed Press: London

Shiva, Vandana, and J. Bandyopadhyay

1986 The Evolution, Structure and Impacts of Chipko Movement. Mountain Research and Development6(2):132-142.

Sen, Amartya

2000 Globalization: Past and Present. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Featherstone, M., ed.

1990 Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. London: Newbury Park.

Joseph E. Stiglitz

2003 Globalization and Its Discontent. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Kofman, Eleonore, and Gillian Youngs

2003 Globalization: Theory and Practice, London and New York: Continuum.

Robertson, Ronald

1992 Globalization: Social Theory and Global Culture. London: Sage Publications.

Ritzer, George

1998 The McDonaldization Thesis: Explorations and Extensions. London: Sage Publications.

Tsing, Anna

2004 Friction: An Ethnography of Global Connection. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Micklethwait, John, and Adrian Wooldridge

2000 A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalization. New York: Crown Business.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 404: MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course introduces basic concepts and theoretical approaches (critical, ecological, or ethno-medical) to medical anthropology. It explores the on-going debates between cosmopolitan and alternative medicines. Following a critical perspective, it discusses how biomedicine achieved a hegemonic status and the process of survival of alternative medicines in Bangladesh as well as in other cultural contexts. Another highlighted issue in therapy management and the health-seeking process. Finally, the course explores ‘politics’ behind the institutionalization of biomedical healthcare in the subcontinent and discusses the applied aspect of medical anthropology in various cultural contexts.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the importance anthropological approach to the study of biomedicine;
  • define, measure, and categorize biomedicine as a hegemonic global phenomenon;
  • understand the existence of alternative ethno-medicine in Bangladesh;
  • examine the applied aspects of medical anthropology in South Asia and Bangladesh;
  • identify medical problems in Bangladesh and offer an anthropological explanation.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the origin and development of medical anthropology as a sub-discipline;
  • identify basic features of medical anthropology;
  • analyze health, sickness, and illness from medical anthropological perspectives.
  • Definition, subject matter, and development of medical anthropology as a separate area of research
  • Relation of medical anthropology with other disciplines that deal with health and sickness
  • Basic concepts such as disease, illness, and sickness
8 hrs
Unit-2: Health and Illness from a Critical Perspective
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the differences between sickness and illness;
  • identify basic aspects of the social origin of disease and illness;
  • analyze the concept of structural violence and its importance in medical anthropological research.
  • The social origin of disease, illness, and differential experiences of the poor
  • The concept of structural violence
4 hrs
Unit-3: Ecology, Culture, and Health
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the connection between ecology, culture, and health in medical anthropology;
  • identify major causes of health and illness concerning climatic condition;
  • analyze the necessity of nutrition for adapting with ecology
  • Studying health and illness concerning climatic and cultural adaptation
  • The ecology and economy of nutrition
8 hrs
Unit-4: Ethno-medical and Cultural Interpretive Perspectives
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the debate between biomedicine and ethno-medicine;
  • identify the reasons behind the hegemonic status of biomedicine globality;
  • analyze the functions of ethno-medicine as an alternative with a focus on the explanatory model vs. cultural model.
  • Defining ethno-medicine
  • Is biomedicine a kind of ethno-medicine?
  • Explanatory model vs. cultural model
  • The concepts of efficacy and placebo responses, a culture-bound syndrome
8 hrs
   Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Medical Pluralism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concept of medical pluralism;
  • identify major aspects of the hegemonic status of biomedicine, and counter-resistance via alternative medicine;
  • analyze the status of folk medicine in Bangladesh and their importance in medical anthropological research.
  • Meaning of medical pluralism
  • The idea of humoral medicine
  • Biomedical hegemony in the context of medical pluralism
  • Survival of alternative medicines (debates on their dominant, subjugated, or hybridized status)
  • Alternative medicines of Bangladesh (Ayurveda, Unani, Homeopathy, and Folk)
4 hrs
Unit-6: Therapy Management and Health Seeking Process
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the importance of therapy management and its global popularity;
  • identify health-seeking factors;
  • analyze the role of physicians, traditional healers, and birth attendants in the health-seeking process.
  • Defining therapy management process
  • Formation and function of the therapy management group, sequential therapy seeking
  • Factors influencing therapy seeking process—household dynamics, access to capital and health facility
  • Role of the therapy management group, physicians, traditional healers, and birth attendants in the health-seeking process
8 hrs
Unit-7: Birth, Medicalization, and Concept of Power
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the differences between home birth and hospital birth;
  • identify new reproductive technology;

analyze the connection between social control and medicalization.

  • Homebirth vs. hospital birth
  • Bio-power and the production of authoritative knowledge
  • Infertility, stigma and biomedical intervention
  • New reproductive technologies and the definition of kinship
  • Medicalization and the issue of social control
4 hrs
Unit-8: Colonial and Post-colonial Context of Disease and Medicine
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the colonial and post-colonial context of disease and medicine;
  • identify major causes to the advent of western medicine during the British colonial era in South Asia;
  • analyze the violence of western medical science on non-western society.
  • Institutionalization of bio-medicine in the Subcontinent
8 hrs
Unit-9: Medical Anthropology: Applied Perspectives
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain contemporary aspects of applied perspectives of medical anthropology;
  • identify major areas of applying medical anthropology;
  • analyze how anthropological perspectives can be used to solve medical problems globally and in culture-specific.
  • Applied perspectives of medical anthropology
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Brown, Peter. J., ed.

1998 Understanding and applying medical anthropology. London: Mayfield Publishing Company.

Baer, Hans A., with Merrill Singer and Ida Susser

2003 Medical anthropology and the world system. London: Praeger.

Ernst, W., ed.

2002 Plural medicine, tradition and modernity. London: Routledge.

Janzen, John M.

2002 The social fabric of health. Boston: McGraw Hill.

Leslie, Charles, and Allan Young

1992 Paths to Asian Medical Knowledge. Berkley: University of California Press.

McElroy, Ann, and Patricia K. Townsend

1989 Medical Anthropology in Ecological Perspective. San Francisco: Westview Press.

Nichter, Mark, and Margaret Lock, eds.

2002 New horizons in medical anthropology. London: Routledge.

Ram, Kalpana, and Margaret Jolly, eds.

1998 Maternities and modernities: Colonial and postcolonial experiences in Asia and the Pacific. London: Cambridge University Press.

Singer, Merrill, and Hans A. Baer

2007 Introducing medical anthropology: A discipline in action. New York: Rowman& Littlefield.

Singer, Merrill, and Pamela Erickson, eds.

2011 A Companion to Medical Anthropology. Malden: Wiley-Blackwell.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Afsana, Kaosar

2005 Disciplining Birth: Power, Knowledge and Childbirth Practice-Bangladesh. Dhaka: University Press Limited.

Begum, Farhana

2015 Women’s Reproductive Illness: Capital and Health Seeking. Dhaka: Dhaka University Prakashana Sangstha.

Berlin, Elois Ann, and Brent Berlin, eds.

1994 Medical Ethnobiology of the Highland Maya of Chipas Mexico: The Gatroeintestinal Diseases. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Fabnega, Horacio, Jr., and Daniel B. Silver

1973 Illness and Shamanistic Curing in Zincantan: An Ethnomedical Analysis. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Farmer, Paul

1999 Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Foucault, Michel

1973 The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception. New York: Vintage Book.

Helman, Cecil

1994 Culture, Health and Illness. New York: Taylor & Francis.

Islam, M. Saiful

2016 Culture, Health and Development in South Asia: Arsenic Poisoning in Bangladesh. London and New York: Routledge.

Katz, Richard

1982 Boiling Energy: Community Healing among the Kalahari Kung. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Jordan, Brigitte

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