BSS Coures

5.8 FOURTH YEAR 8TH SEMESTER BSS (HONORS)

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 451: ANTHROPOLOGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course will examine the human dimensions of climate change from a cultural perspective. It will highlight the interactions among societies, cultures, and climate change. The course contains anthropological perspectives and discourses on climate and global environmental changes. It also includes encountering climate change through ethnographic studies around the world. The politics of climate change and engaging anthropology in climate change in Bangladesh will also be focused upon.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the scientific basis and human dimensions of climate change;
  • highlight the interactions among societies, cultures, and climate change;
  • examine technological, social and cultural resilience, mitigation and adaptation strategies of climate change;
  • identify the global, regional, and national politics of climate change;
  • understand the climate change of Bangladesh from anthropological perspectives.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Anthropological Perspectives on Climate Change
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain major anthropological perspectives on climate change;
  • identify the differences between weather and climate;
  • analyze the concepts like carbon emission, ecological footprints, etc. to study climate change.
  • Climate and weather: from environmental science to social science
  • The concepts of environmentalism, ecological footprints, global climate, and challenges, carbon emission
8 hrs
Unit-2: Fielding Climate Change in Cultural Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain field perspectives to study climate change;
  • identify major issues of cultural anthropology to study climate change;
  • analyze the processes of doing fieldwork on climate change using peoples’ perception, knowledge, valuation, and responses.
  • The method of being there and four cultural axioms- peoples’ perception, knowledge, valuation, and responses
8 hrs
Unit-3: Theoretical Approaches to Climate Change
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain major theoretical approaches to climate change;
  • identify major aspects of human and political-ecological perspectives on climate change;
  • analyze the theories of sustainability and adaptation and draw a linkage between climate change and development discourse.
  • Theories of human and political ecology
  • Theories of sustainability, adaptation, and development
8 hrs
Unit-4: Encountering Climate Change
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the coping mechanism and adaptation process of climate change;
  • identify major aspects of the use of indigenous knowledge for reducing the risk of climate-induced natural disasters;
  • analyze the processes of climate-induced risk reduction.
  • Adaptation to climate change and climate risk management
  • Indigenous knowledge of climate change
  • Ex-ante and ex-post coping strategies
  • Adaptation to climate change and disaster risk reduction
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Re-meaning of Vulnerability and Climate Change
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of vulnerability as a concept;
  • identify major impacts of climate change on migration, displacement, and environmental refugee;
  • analyze the link between identity and climate-induced forced migration.
  • Vulnerability, migration, and environmental refugee
  • Displacement and identity
6 hrs
Unit-6: Poetics and Politics of Climate Change
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of global and geopolitics behind climate change discourse;
  • identify major impacts of a low-carbon economy and clean development mechanism on climate change;
  • analyze policy and climate change discourse, Gidden’s paradox, and the importance of climate justice.
  • Geopolitics and international negotiations on climate change (Kyoto protocol, Hyogo framework for action and COP-15 Rio Earth Summit and Rio 20 and Bali)
  • Low-carbon economy and clean development mechanism; carbon markets for development
  • Climate justice: finance for mitigation and adaptation; Giddens’ paradox-the third way, policy analysis and assessing impacts of policy
  • Perspectives on international policy and integrating policy objectives
8 hrs
Unit-7: Engaging Anthropology in Climate Change in Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how and why Bangladesh is caught between global climate change discourse;
  • identify the climate-induced problems, policy, and measurements in Bangladesh;
  • analyze the relationship between climate change impact on most vulnerable groups like children, women, minorities.
  • Challenges of climate change for the most vulnerable country, policies of adaptation, and mitigation in Bangladesh
  • Assessing impacts of NAPA and mainstreaming climate change into development policy
  • Climatic resilient ecosystem conservation in Bangladesh
  • Carbon measurement and ecosystem monitoring
  • Gender, climate change, and the most vulnerable groups (women, children, indigenous groups, minorities, PWDS, etc.)
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Adger, W. Neil, with Irene Lorenzoni and Karen L. O’Brien, eds.

2009 Adapting to Climate Change: Thresholds, Values, Governance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Crate, Susan A., and Mark Nuttall, eds.

2009 Anthropology and Climate Change: From Encounters to Actions. Walnut Creek, California: Left Coast Press, Inc.

Haenn, Nora, and Richard R. Wilk, eds.

2006 The Environment in Anthropology: A Reader in Ecology, Culture, and Sustainable Living. New York and London: New York University Press.

Islam, Zahidul, and Shafie, Hasan

2017 Anthropology of Climate Change: Culture and Adaptation in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Bangladesh Climate Change Trust, MOEF, and Department of Anthropology, University of Dhaka.

Islam, Zahidul, Shafie, Hasan, and Mahmood, Raasheed

2017 Culture, Adaptation and Resilience: Essays on Climate Change Regime in South Asia. Dhaka: Bangladesh Climate Change Trust, MOEF, and Department of Anthropology, University of Dhaka.

Moran, Emilio F.

2006 People and Nature: An Introduction to Human Ecological Relations. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Strauss, Sarah, and Benjamin S. Orlove, eds.

2003 Weather, Climate, Culture. Oxford: Oxford International Publishers Ltd.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Adams, W. M.

2009 Green Development: Environment and sustainability in a developing world. London and New York: Routledge.

Adger, W. Neil, with Jouni Paavola, Saleemul Huq and M. J. Mace, eds.

2006 Fairness in Adaptation to Climate Change. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Bizikova, L., with J. Robinson and S. Cohen, eds.

2007 Integrating Climate Change Actions into Local Development. London: Earthscan.

Forsyth, Tim

2003 Critical Political Ecology. The politics of environmental science. London and New York:  Routledge.

Leary, N., with J. Adejuwon, V. Barros, I. Burton, J. Kulkarni and R. Lasco, eds.

2008 Climate Change and Adaptation. London: Earthscan.

Lohmann, L.

2006 Carbon Trading: A critical conversation on climate change, privatisation and power, Sweden: Development Dialogue.

Metz, Bert, and Marcel Kok, eds.

2008 Development Policy as a Way to Manage Climate Change Risks. London: Earthscan.

Newell, Peter

2006 Climate for Change: Non-State Actors and the Global Politics of the Greenhouse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Smith, Joel B., with  Richard J. T. Klein and Saleemul Huq, eds.

2003 Climate Change, Adaptive Capacity and Development. London: Imperial College Press.

Speth, James Gustave

2008 The Bridge at the Edge of the World: Capitalism, the Environment, and Crossing from Crisis to Sustainability. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Roberts, J. Timmons, and Bradley C. Parks

2007 A Climate of Injustice: Global Inequality, North-South Politics, and Climate Policy. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Watkins, Kevin

2007 Human Development Report 2007/8: Fighting Climate Change: Human Solidarity in a Divided World. New York: UNDP.

ইসলাম, জাহিদুল, ও উদ্দিন, বোরহান
২০১৭ নৃবিজ্ঞান এবং জলবায়ু পরিবর্তন: পরিপ্রেক্ষিত বাংলাদেশ। ঢাকা: বাংলাদেশ জলবায়ু পরিবর্তন ট্রাস্ট, পরিবেশ ও বন মন্ত্রণালয়।

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 452: SOCIAL INEQUALITY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course will introduce different forms of inequalities in society from anthropological perspectives. It will critically address the different theoretical explanations of causes and persistence of inequality, and its implications on society. The course will also focus on the conceptualization and dimensions of and the approaches to social inequality. It will highlight the different forms of inequality e.g. caste, racism/colorism, religious communalism, age, class, ethnicity, gender, and health with ethnographic examples.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand social inequality from anthropological perspectives;
  • know different theoretical school of thoughts regarding the origin of social inequality;
  • understand inequality based on caste, racism/colorism, communalism, age, class, ethnicity, gender;
  • examine the nature of inequality from ethnographic perspectives;
  • identify the ways how can anthropology contribute to the fighting against social inequality, both globally and culture-specific.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Conceptualizing Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of social inequality;
  • identify the differences between social stratification and social inequality;
  • analyze the nature and dimensions of inequality.
  • Conceptualizing inequality: inequality and stratification, nature and dimensions of inequality
4 hrs
Unit-2: Theories of Social Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different schools of thought regarding social inequality;
  • identify major aspects of different theories regarding social inequality;

analyze how Weber’s theory of class differs from Marx’s theory to explain the origin of inequality and evaluate Gramsci.

  • Theories of social inequality: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Antonio Gramsci
8 hrs
Unit-3: Origin and Development of Inequality from Egalitarian to Stratified Society
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the origin of inequality from historical perspectives;
  • identify major causes to the existence and condition of inequality in foraging and pastoral society;
  • analyze the facts of the emergence of inequality during the advent of agricultural and industrial societies.
  • Inequality in foraging, pastoral, agricultural, and industrial societies
4 hrs
Unit-4: Dilemmas Concerning Equality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the paradoxical existence of inequality and equality;
  • identify major factors regarding equality and inequality as two sides of the same coin;
  • analyze factors responsible to reach the end of an inequality free society.
  • Are equality and inequality two sides of the same coin?
Unit-5: Caste and Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain why and how caste is a phenomenon of inequality;
  • identify major aspects to the origin of caste in India;
  • analyze and critically look at the question- is caste a pan Indian phenomena?
  • Persistence of caste in India and around the world
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Race, Racism, and Colorism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relationship between racism/colorism and inequality;
  • identify an answer to the critical question- is pure race a myth?;
  • analyze the origin, function, and persistence of racism/colorism in countries like the USA, Australia, and countries of the South/Third World.
  • The cases of USA, Australia, Europe, Latin America, South Africa, and the Indian subcontinent
4 hrs
Unit-7: Gender and Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain why and how gender inequality originated and it persists in different forms;
  • identify major aspects of the relationship between gender and inequality;
  • analyze the condition of gender inequality in the countries of North and South.
  • From domesticity to the public sphere- case studies from the USA, Great Britain, and Indian subcontinent
8 hrs
Unit-8: Ethnicity and Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the connections between ethnicity and inequality;
  • identify different forms of ethnic stratification;
  • analyze different dimensions of inclusion, exclusion, and violation of human rights.
  • Ethnic stratification, prejudice, and discrimination
  • Policies of exclusion and inclusion
  • Violation of human rights
4 hrs
Unit-9: Age and Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relationship between age and inequality;
  • identify basic issues for the construction of life stages;
  • analyze age-based inequality in an egalitarian society.
  • Construction of life stages, imaging youth and old age, redefining age
  • Cases of age grade and age set: Nuer and others
8 hrs
Unit-10: Class and Inequality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relationship between class and inequality;
  • identify major aspects of a class-based inequality in modern society;
  • analyze the factors influencing class-based inequality.
  • Aspects related to class inequality: food and nutrition, housing and sanitation, education, health, and resources
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination
 

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Beteille, Andre, ed.

1972 Social Inequality: Selected Readings. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books.

Evans-Pritchard, Edward Evan

1940 The Nuer: A Description of the Modes of Livelihood and Political Institutions of a Nilotic People. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Marx, Karl

1859 A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy. Moscow: Progress Publishers.

Ortner, Sherry B., and H. Whitehead, eds.

1981 Sexual Meaning: The Cultural Construction of Gender and Sexuality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rex, J., and D. Mason, eds.

1983 Theories of Race and Ethnic Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rosaldo, Michelle Zimbalist, and Louise Lamphere, eds.

1974 Women, Culture and Society. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Sahlines, Marshall D.

1967 Social Stratification in Polynesia. Washington: University of Washington Press.

Weber, Max

1946 Class, Status and Party. In Essays in Sociology. Max Weber, ed. Pp. 180-95. New York: Oxford University Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Grabb, Edward G.

1984 Social Inequality: Classical and Contemporary Theorists. Canada: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Guisberman, M., and John Rek, eds.

1999 The Ethnicity Reader, Nationalism, Multiculturalism and Migration. London: Polly Press.

Gupta, Dipankar, ed.

1991 Social Stratification. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kriesberg, Louis

1979 Social Inequality. New York: Prentice-Hall.

Lenski, Gerhard E.

1984 Power and Privilege: A Theory of Social Stratification. Chapel Hill and London: The University of North Carolina Press.

Tumin, Melvin Marvin

1970 Readings on Social Stratification. New York: Prentice-Hall.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 453: PEASANT SOCIETY

 

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

 

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course provides students with an understanding of anthropological perspectives on peasant society. It will examine relevant issues and theories on peasant and peasantry. The course begins with the conceptualization of peasants and the theorization of peasant society. Then it focuses on the cross-cultural contexts of the peasant economy, politics, development, and movements.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand peasantry as a class;
  • define, measure, and categorize peasantry;
  • understand the theories of the peasantry;
  • examine the relationship between peasantry and development;
  • identify peasant as a revolutionary class and the nature of peasant insurgency/revolution/revolt;
  • examine the causes and consequences of the peasant movement in the 21st

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts regarding peasants;
  • identify the categories of peasants;
  • analyze the theoretical debates on the peasantry in peasant studies.
  • Conceptualization, de-conceptualization, and debates regarding peasants
4 hrs
Unit-2: Anthropological Perspectives on Peasant Society and Culture
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the classical and anthropological theories on peasant society and culture;
  • identify basic features of the perspectives on peasant society and culture;
  • analyze ideas like the image of limited goods, moral economy, differentiation, polarization, and peasant mobility.
  • Classical and Anthropological Studies on Peasants: Vladimir Illich Lennin, Alexander Chayanov, Teodor Shanin, Robert Redfield, Alfred Lewis, Eric Wolf, George M. Foster, James Scott, and the like
12 hrs
Unit-3: Peasant Economy
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the issues of agrarian structure, mode of production, the relation of production, and patron-client relation in peasant economy;
  • identify economic characteristics of peasant society and the patron-client relationship in peasant economy;
  • analyze the issues of peasant society in a capitalist economy.
  • Agrarian structure
  • Agrarian relations and mode of production
4 hrs
Unit-4: Power, Authority and Politics in the Peasant Society
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the political relations of the peasant class with other class in the society;
  • identify formal and informal peasant political organization and their interrelation;
  • analyze the nature of factional politics among the peasant society and the emergence of leadership among peasants.
  • Formal and informal political organizations
  • Factional politics and leadership
4 hrs
Unit-5: Development of Capitalism in Agriculture and its Impact
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history of how capitalism did penetrate peasant society of the South;
  • identify the pauperization process in peasant society;
  • analyze the Green Revolution in the South and its impact on peasant society.
  • Use of modern technology
  • Agribusiness, polarization, and pauperization

Green Revolution: a critical review

4 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Stratification and Mobility
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the causes of stratification among the peasant societies and the nature of peasant mobility;
  • identify the process of marginalization in peasant society;
  • analyze the nature of the power struggle in peasant society.
  • Class, status, and power
  • Polarization and marginalization
4 hrs
Unit-7: Gender Relations in Peasant Society
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the gender division of labor in peasant society;
  • identify the contribution of female labor in peasant society;
  • analyze the allocation of property among women in peasant society.
  • Role differentiation in agricultural activities
4 hrs
Unit-8: Peasant Consciousness, Rebellion, and Movements
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history and nature of peasant insurgency in colonial and postcolonial time;
  • identify major causes to the rise of peasant consciousness and its revolutionary potentials;
  • analyze peasant movements such as Tebhaga and Tonko in Bangladesh
  • Class-in-itself, class for itself
  • Peasant revolution- Tebhaga, Tonko and the like
8 hrs
Unit-9: Social Transformation and Peasantry
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain recent transformations which occur in peasant society in Russia and China;
  • identify major issues covered by these transformations;
  • analyze peasantry through social transformations with examples.
  • Social transformation and peasantry: cases from Russia and China
8 hrs
Unit-10: Peasant and Agricultural Labors in South Asia
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of agricultural labors from South Asia;
  • identify major aspects of peasantry and agriculture in South Asia;
  • analyze the future of agricultural labor in South Asia.
  • Peasant and agricultural labors: South Asian context
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Adnan, Shapan

1983 The Conditions of Peasantry in Bangladesh. In Social Anthropology of Peasantry. Joan P. Mencher, ed. Bombay and Delhi: Somaiya Publications Pvt. Ltd

Arens, Jenneke, and Jos Van Beurden

1980 Jhagrapur: Poor Peasants and Women in a Village in Bangladesh. New Delhi: Orient Longman.

Chayanov, Alexander

1966 The Theory of Peasant Economy. New York: I.B. Tauris& Co Ltd.

Ellis, Frank

1993 Peasant Economics: Farm Households and Agrarian Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha, Ranajit

1985 Elementary Aspects of Peasant Insurgency in Colonial India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Jahangir, Burhanuddin Khan

1979 Differentiation, Polarization and Confrontation in Rural Bangladesh. Dhaka: Center for Social Studies.

Karim, A. H. M. Zehadul

1990 The Pattern of Rural Leadership in an Agrarian Society: A Case Study of Changing Power Structure in Bangladesh. New Delhi: Northern Book Centre.

Mencher, John P., ed.

1983 The Social Anthropology of Peasantry. Bombay: Somaiya Publications.

Potter, Jack M., with May N. Diaz and George M. Foster, eds.

1967 Peasant Societies: A Reader. Boston: Little Brown

Rahman, Atiur

1990 Peasants and Classes: A Study in Differentiation in Bangladesh. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Scott, James C.

1976 The Moral Economy of the Peasant: Rebellion and Subsistence in Southeast Asia. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Scott, James C.

1987 Weapons of the Weak: Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance. US: Yale University Press.

Shanin, Teodor, ed.

1971 Peasants and Peasant Societies. London: Penguin Books.

Wolf, Eric Robert

1966 Peasants. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Bertocci, Peter. J.

1970 Elusive Villages: Social Structure and Community Organization in Rural East Pakistan. Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State University.

Chowhury, Anwarullah

1978 A Bangladesh Village: A Study of Social Stratification. Dhaka: Center for Social Studies.

Chowhury, Anwarullah

1984 Agrarian Social Relations and Rural Development in Bangladesh. Delhi: Roman and Allanheld.

Foster, George M.

1973 Traditional Societies and Technological Change. New York: Harper & Row.

Jahangir, Borhanuddin Khan

1982 Rural Society, Power Structure and Class Practice. Dhaka: Center for Social Studies.

Mukherjee, R. K.

1971 Six Villages of Bengal. Bombay: Popular Prakashan.

Redfield, Robert

1971 The Little Community and Peasant Society and Culture. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Schendel, Wilhem Van

1981 Peasant Mobility: The Odds of Life in Rural Bangladesh. Assen: Van Gorcum.

Scott, James C.

1990 Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcript. US: Yale University Press.

Wolf, Eric Robert

1969 Peasant Wars of the Twentieth Century. New York: Harper and Row.

Witfogel, Karl

1976 Oriental Despotism: A Comparative Study of Total Power. US: Yale University Press.

Wood, Jeoffry D.

1994 Bangladesh: Whose Ideas, Whose Interests? Dhaka: University Press Limited.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 454: FOREST AND FOREST DEPENDENT PEOPLE

 

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

 

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course aims to guide the students to the current contexts of forest and forest-dependent people. Starting with the basic understanding of the forest, this course will focus on the issues related to forest and forest-dependent such as ecological adaptation, resources and their management, cultural aspects and environmental concerns, property rights, and, forest policy and gender.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • to understand forestry from anthropological perspectives;
  • to identify the reasons for forest degradation, globally, regionally, nationally, and locally;
  • to understand the experiences and importance of the forest to the forest-dependent people;
  • to examine the effectiveness of community-based forest management;
  • to understand forest movements in Bangladesh and other counties.

 

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Forest and Forest Dependent People
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of forestry from anthropological perspectives;
  • identify the debates on forest and forest-dependent people;
  • analyze the theoretical approaches to forestry.
  • Concepts, Issues, approaches, and debates
4 hrs
Unit-2: Adaptation of Forest Dependent People
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how forest-dependent people adapt to their forest ecosystem;
  • identify the processes of foraging people, pastoralist, shifting cultivator to adapt to their forest ecosystem;
  • analyze the condition of forest-dependent people in industrial society.
  • Means of subsistence
  • Food gathering and food-producing technology-foraging, pastoralism, shifting/slash and burn cultivation, and agriculture
  • Forest dependent people in industrial societies
8 hrs
Unit-3: Contemporary Issues in Human Ecology and Forest Resources
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain human ecology;
  • identify major aspects of human ecology and forest resources;
  • analyze the contemporary issue in human ecology and forest resource management.
  • Contemporary issues in human ecology and forest resources
4 hrs
Unit-4: Social Organization of Forest Dependent People
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the social organization of forest-dependent people;
  • identify important roles played by kinship for organizing labor, principles of adaptation, and resource management;
  • analyze the nature of resource competition, power struggle, and formal/informal political structure among the forest people.
  • Kinship, family, power, and politics
Unit-5: Beliefs and Rituals associated with Forest and Forest Products
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the religious aspects of the forest;
  • identify major aspects of the idea of ‘sacred forest’ among the forest people;
  • analyze the importance of ritual to the forest people.
  • The medicinal, economic, social, and cultural importance of trees
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Environmental Concerns
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the reasons for deforestation both globally and locally;
  • identify the relation between climate change, natural disaster, and forestry;
  • analyze resource depletion issues and false blaming to the forest people.
  • Human interventions and forest depletion
  • Wildlife and bio-diversity losses
  • Fuelwood crisis
  • Climate change, global warming, and natural disasters concerning forest
8 hrs
Unit-7: Gender Role Differentiation in Forestry
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the importance of female labor in forest resource management;
  • identify the major role of women in protecting the forest, for example-Chipko movement;
  • analyze the idea of mother nature and feminity among the forest people.
  • Tree plantation, fuelwood, food, and fodder collection
  • Forest resource management
4 hrs
Unit-8: Forest Regime, Property Rights and Policy Issues
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relationship between land and forest management;
  • identify forest policies and their effectiveness for forest protection;
  • analyze forest policy and rights of the indigenous people.
  • Tree and land tenure systems
  • Legal and policy issues- regional, national and global perspectives
4 hrs
Unit-9: Forest Management and People’s Participation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the idea of co-management in forestry;
  • identify major government and non-government efforts to restore the forest in Bangladesh;
  • analyze the importance of indigenous people in forest resource management.
  • Co-management of natural resources
  • Resilient ecosystem conservation
  • REDD+ for forest and biodiversity conservation
  • Social forestry
  • GO, NGO and local/indigenous people’s participation in forestry
8 hrs
Unit-10: Research on Forest and Forestry
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the future initiatives for research on forestry;
  • identify major areas for research on forest and forestry;
  • analyze the potentiality of new research on forestry and forest management, both globally and locally.
  • Eco-system and agro-system analysis
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination
 

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Ahmed, Miyan Rkkunuddin, ed.

1991 Social Forestry and Community Development. FTTP: FAO.

Howley, Amos H.

1950 Human Ecology: A Theory of Community Structure. Michigan: Ronald Press Co.

Gain, Philip, ed.

1995 Bangladesh: Land, Forest and Forest People. Dhaka: Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD).

Turnbull, Colin M.

1962 The Forest People. London: A Touchtone Book.

 

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Agarwal, Anil Kumar, and Sunita Narain

1992 Towards a Greener World: Should Global Environmental Management be Built on Legal Convention or Human Rights? New Delhi: Centre for Science and Environment.

Ali, M. Omar, and Farid Uddin Ahmed, eds.

1993 Agroforestry Research Techniques. Dhaka: BARC-Winrock International.

Bennett, J. W.

1976 The Ecological Transition: Cultural Anthropology and Human Adaptation. New York: Pergamon.

Brown, Lester Russell

1981 Building a Sustainable Society. New York: Norton.

Burch, W. R.

1987 Gods of Forest- Myth: Ritual and Television in Community Forestry. Paper presented at Regional Community Forestry Training Centre, Bangkok, December 15-19.

Burch, W. R., and J. K. Panker, eds.

1992 Social Science Application in Asian Agroforestry. New Delhi: IBH Publishing Co.

Burger, Julian, ed.

1990 The Gaia Atlas of Forest Peoples. London: Robertson McCarta.

Chagnon, Nepoleon A.

2013 Yanomamo. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Chundawat, B. S., and S. K. Goutam

2010 Textbook of Agroforestry. New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Publishing Company Private Limited.

Douglas, J. J.

1983 A Reappraisal of Forestry Development in Developing Countries. Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.

Fernandes, Walter

1988 Forests, Environment and Tribal Economy. New Delhi: Indian Social Institute.

Gain, Philip

1998 The Last Forests of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD).

Government of Bangladesh

1994 Forestry Master Plan. Dhaka: Ministry of Environment and Forest.

Haque, M. F. and A. Alim

1995 A Social Forestry in Bangladesh: State of Art Study. BARC: Winrock International.

Hisham, Mohamed Ahmed

1991 Whose Trees?: A People’s View of Forestry Aid. London: Panos Publications Limited.

Lee, Richard B., and Irven Devore, eds.

2009[1968] Man the Hunter. New Brunswick and Oxford: Aldine Transaction.

Leonard, H. Jeffrey

1989 Environment and the Poor: Development Strategies for a Common Agenda. New Brunswick and Oxford: Transaction Books.

Rush, James Robert

1991 The Last Tree: Reclaiming the Environment in Tropical Asia. New York: The Asia Society.

Scupin, Raymond, and Christopher R. DeCorse

2015 Anthropology: A Global Perspective. New York: Pearson Education.

Service, Elman Rogers

1966 The Hunters. New York: Prentice-Hall.

Sontheimer, Sally, ed.

1991 Women and the Environment: A Reader: Crisis and Development in the Third World. London: Earthsacn Publications Ltd.

Tarasofsky, Richard G.

1999 Assessing the International Forest Regime. London: IUCN.

Westoby, J.

1987 The Purpose of Forest: Follies of Development. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 455: ANTHROPOLOGY OF POVERTY

 

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to provide knowledge and understanding of poverty from anthropological perspectives. In this regard, an attempt has been made to bring into focus the increasing impact of climate change, food insecurity, starvation, and similar other issues on people of different countries. Emphasis has been given to examining the dynamics, strength, and impact of poverty to reduce the risk and vulnerability to an acceptable limit.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the importance anthropological approach to the study of ‘poverty’;
  • define, measure, and categorize poverty as a global phenomenon;
  • understand the experiences, causes, and consequences of poverty;
  • examine the programs undertaken by the international, national, non-governmental and voluntary institutions for alleviating poverty;
  • identify conflicting views on poverty and its remedies with reference from Bangladesh.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Anthropological Understanding of Poverty
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concept, nature, and characteristics of poverty;
  • identify major anthropological approaches to address poverty;
  • analyze local people’s perspectives and discourses on poverty.
  • Meaning and definition of poverty
  • Characteristics of poverty
  • Different discourses on poverty and people’s perspectives
8 hrs
Unit-2: Measurements of Poverty
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the context-specific aspects of poverty;
  • identify major measurement techniques of poverty;
  • analyze people’s perspectives to measure poverty through their narratives.
  • Contextual analysis of poverty
  • Narrative analysis of poverty
4 hrs
Unit-2: Measurements of Poverty
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the context-specific aspects of poverty;
  • identify major measurement techniques of poverty;
  • analyze people’s perspectives to measure poverty through their narratives.
  • Contextual analysis of poverty
  • Narrative analysis of poverty
4 hrs
Unit-3: Causes and Consequences of Poverty
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different dimensions to the causes of poverty;
  • identify the consequences of poverty;

analyze the connection of poverty with inequality and human rights.

  • Different dimensions to the causes of poverty: individual deficiencies, the culture of poverty, situational poverty, structural poverty
  • Consequences of poverty: education, health, housing, life chances and lifestyles, poverty as an extreme form of inequality, poverty as a violation of human rights
8 hrs
Unit-4: Neoliberalism and Poverty
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the neoliberal understanding of poverty;
  • identify the connection between free trade, privatization, and poverty;
  • analyze the nature of structural adjustment to poverty and the role of NGOs for poverty alleviation.
  • Free trade
  • Privatization
  • Structural adjustment
  • NGOs and poverty alleviation initiatives
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Culture, Politics, and Poverty
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how the culture of poverty operates in society;
  • identify different aspects of culture and politics concerning poverty;
  • analyze the poverty-politics nexus.
  • Culture of poverty
  • The connection between politics and poverty
8 hrs
Unit-6: Poverty, Capability Deprivation and Famine
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of capability deprivation of individuals for poverty;
  • identify the root causes of capability deprivation;
  • analyze the nature of famine and its connection with poverty.
  • Poverty as capability deprivation of individuals
  • Poverty and famine
8 hrs
Unit-7: Poverty and Food Security
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the major aspects of human rights;
  • identify the characteristics of food security and determine the connection between food security and poverty;
  • analyze the significance of social justice to alleviate poverty.
  • Human rights
  • Food security
  • Social justice
4 hrs
Unit-8: Poverty and Environment
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the impact of the environment on poverty;
  • identify major aspects of the structural issues of poverty;
  • analyze human-induced causes of poverty.
  • Poverty-environment nexus
  • Neglecting the structural issues of poverty
  • Poverty is man-made
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Banerjee, Abihijit, with Roland Bénabou, and Dilip Mookherjee, eds.

2006 Understanding Poverty. New York: Oxford University Press.

Banerjee, Abhijit,and Esther Duflo

2012 Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of a Way to Fight Global Poverty. Philadelphia: Public Affairs Press.

Cancian, Marie, and Sheldon Danziger, eds.

2009 Changing Poverty, Changing Policies. London: Russell Sage Foundation.

Farmer, Paul

2012 Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Narayan-Parker, Deepa

2000 Voices of the Poor: Can Anyone Hear Us? Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Beneria, Lourdes

1997 Accumulation, reproduction and Womens role in economic development revisited. The women, gender, and development reader. London and New Jersey: Zed Books.

Bradshaw, Ted K.

2006 Theories of Poverty and Anti-Poverty Programs in Community Development. Columbia: Rural Poverty Research Center.

Buss, T.F., and A. Gardner

2008 Haiti in the balance: why foreign aid has failed and what we can do about it. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press.

Chacko, Elizabeth

2003 Marriage, development, and the status of women in Kerala, India. Gender and Development 11(2):52–59.

Davidson, James D.

1985 Theories and Measures of Poverty: Toward A Holistic Approach. Sociological Focus 18(3):177-98.

Escobar, Arturo

1991 Anthropology and the Development Encounter: The Making and Marketing of Development Anthropology. American Ethnologist 18(4):658–682.

Fraser, Nancy

2009 Feminism, Capitalism and the Cunning of History. New Left Review 56.

Fukuyama, Francis

1989 The End of History? The National Interest 16:3–18.

Gow, David D.

2002 Anthropology and development: Evil twin or moral narrative? Human Organization 61(4):299–313.

Hallward, Peter

2004 Option Zero in Haiti. New Left Review 27.

Hye, Hasnat Abdul

1996 Below the Line: Rural Poverty in Bangladesh. Dhaka: University Press Limited.

James E. C.

2010 Democratic insecurities: violence, trauma, and intervention inHaiti. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Keane, John

2009 Monitory Democracy and Media-saturated Societies. GriffithReview24:47–69.

Krantz, Lasse

2001 The Sustainable Livelihood Approach to Poverty Reduction: An Introduction. Sweden: SIDA.

Lazar, Sian

2004 Education for Credit: Development as Citizenship Project in Bolivia. Critique of Anthropology 24(3):301–319.

Leach, F., and S. Sitaram

2002 Microfinance and women’s empowerment: A lesson from India. Development in Practice 12(5):575–588.

Li, Heming, with Paul Waley and Philip Rees

2001 Reservoir resettlement in China: past experience and the Three Gorges Dam. Geographical Journal 167(3).

Li, T. M.

2002 Engaging Simplifications: Community-Based Resource Management, Market Processes and State Agendas in Upland Southeast Asia. World Development 30(2):265–283.

Lie J.H. S.

2008 Post-Development Theory and the Discourse-Agency Conundrum. Social Analysis 52(3):118–137.

McCully, P.

1996 Temples of doom: the human consequences of dams. Silencedrivers: the ecology and politics of large dams. London and New Jersey: Zed Books.

McDuie-RA, D.

2008 Between National Security and Ethno-nationalism: The Regional Politics of Development in Northeast India. Journal of South Asian Development 3(2):185–210.

Mintz, Sidney Wilfred

1985 Eating and being. Sweetness and power: the place of sugar in modern history. New York: Viking.

Mintz, Sidney Wilfred

1985 Food, sociality, and sugar. Sweetness and power: the place of sugar in modern history. New York: Viking.

Mohanty, Chandra Talpade

2003 Cartographies of struggle: third world women and the politics of feminism. Feminism without borders: decolonizing theory, practicing solidarity. Durham and London: DukeUniversity Press.

Mosse, D.

2005 Cultivating development: an ethnography of aid policy and practice. London: Pluto Press.

Nair, S.

2005 Population Politics and Women’s Health in a Free Market Economy. Development48(4):43–51.

Newson, J.

2002 Bougainville microfinance: rebuilding rural communities after the crisis. Development Bulletin.

Procacci, Giovanna

1991 Social economy and the government of poverty. In The Foucault effect: studies in governmentality: with two lectures by and an interview with Michel Foucault. G. Burchell, with C. Gordon and P. Miller. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Rahman, A. Atiq, ed.

1998 Environment and Poverty. Dhaka: University Press Limited.

Sahlins, M.

1974 The original affluent society. Stone age economics. New York: Aldine-Atherton.

Schuller, M.

2007 Seeing Like a “Failed” NGO: Globalization’s Impacts on State and Civil Society in Haiti. Polar: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 30(1):67–89.

Schuller, M.

2009 Gluing Globalization: NGOs as Intermediaries in Haiti. Polar: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 32(1):84–104.

Sen, Amartya

1981 Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Shamsie, Y.

2009 Export processing zones: The purported glimmer in Haiti’s development murk. Review of International Political Economy 16(4):649–672.

Shaw, J.

2004 Microenterprise Occupation and Poverty Reduction in Micro finance Programs: Evidence from Sri Lanka. World Development 32(7):1247–1264.

Shrestha, Nanda

2002 Becoming a development category. In Development: a cultural studies reader. S. Schech and J. Haggis, eds. Oxford: Blackwell.

Slack, Paul Alexander

1988 Poverty and policy in Tudor and Stuart England. London: Longman.

Smith-Oka, V.

2009 Unintended consequences: Exploring the tensions between development programs and indigenous women in Mexico in the context of reproductive health. Social Science &Medicine 68(11):2069–2077.

Susan, Buck-Morss

2000 Hegel and Haiti. Critical Inquiry 26(4):821–865.

Thomas, K.J. A.

2002 Development projects and involuntary population displacement: The World Bank’s attempt to correct past failures. Population Research and Policy Review 21(4):339–349.

Willis, K.

2005 Introduction to What we mean by development. Theories and practices of development. London: Routledge.

World Commission on Environment and Development

1987 Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Yates, D., and S. Paquette

2011 Emergency knowledge management and social media technologies: A case study of the 2010 Haitian earthquake. International Journal of Information Management 31(1):6–13.

Zadek, S.

2008 Collaborative governance: the new multilateralism for the twenty-first century. Global development 2.0: can philanthropists, the public, and the poor make poverty history? New York: Brookings Institution Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 456: ANTHROPOLOGY OF STATE

 

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

 

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course readings would assist us in thinking anthropologically about state formation, state projects, and state effects along with theoretical genealogies of state. The kinds of questions that would be examined include: How are state subjects and citizens made? How can the state itself – as a set of institutions and as an idea– be examined ethnographically? What kinds of cultural understandings underlie a range of state projects and interventions? How can we understand how local populations and/ or subordinate groups experience and respond to such interventions? Given the range of student interests, the aim is to allow students to familiarize themselves with analytical tools that can be applied to their research, rather than to thoroughly review the literature on state formation in any specific region. The course is equally concerned with discerning how the anthropological approach to the modern nation-state may draw upon yet differ from perspectives on the state developed within other disciplines and the new connections and divisions that may arise from staking out a common conceptual space.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the importance of anthropological/ethnographic perspective to the study of the state;
  • look at how to study the state and state formation;
  • examine the causes of state intervention across the globe;
  • examine the responses of local population/subordinate groups due to state penetration;
  • identify those aspects of everyday life ethnographically which are affected by the state intervention;
  • to examine the resistance of ‘stateless people’ against the state penetration.

 

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the fate of nation-states in the age of globalization;
  • identify the genealogical perspective on the emergence of the modern nation-state;
  • analyze the features of modern nation-states.
  • The State in an Age of Globalization
  • The emergence of the modern state: historical perspectives, features of the modern state, nation, and state
10 hrs
Unit-2: Theoretical Genealogies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain governmentality as a new form of bureaucracy;
  • identify major aspects to the emergence of civil society with modern nation-states;
  • analyze how do ISA and RSA work in the modern state and critically look at the condition of freedom in neoliberal democracy.
  • Bureaucracy and governmentality
  • State and civil society
  • Ideology and ideological state apparatuses
  • Power and freedom in late modernity
  • Liberal democracies
10 hrs
Unit-3: Culture, Power and Ideology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how culture, power, and ideology work within nation-state;
  • identify major aspects of the nation-state to maintain her sovereignty;
  • analyze and critically examine the rise of secular formation of nation-state focusing on the role of secularism in South Asia.
  • Power: synthetic, organic, and symbolic
  • Techniques of power
  • Sovereignty and citizenship
  • Secularism and secular state
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: Ethnographic Contexts
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the everyday life of citizens in the state and the condition of language, culture, and economy of the citizen in the state;
  • identify major aspects of the state concerning society, culture, and politics;
  • analyze the discourse of corruption in the state and critically look at the role of popular culture in the modern state.
  • Locating man in the state: cities, people, and language
  • Society, economy, and the state
  • The discourse of corruption
  • The culture of politics, and the imagined state
  • Popular culture and the state
10 hrs
Unit-5: Violence, Law, and Citizenship
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relationship between identity and state formation;
  • identify major features of the increasing militarization of modern state in the neoliberal age;
  • analyze the cause of population displacement and refugee crisis and critically look at the rationalities of government.
  • Cultural logics of belonging and movements
  • Militarization and the current crises
  • Immigrant communities
  • Transnationalism
  • Neo-liberalism and rationalities of government
10 hrs
Unit-6: Scope of Anthropological Engagement
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how anthropologists can contribute to the study of the state;
  • identify major anthropological works on the study of the state;
  • analyze the scope of anthropological engagement in studying the state.
  • Anthropological engagement in studying the state
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Scott, James C.

2009 The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia. USA: Yale University Press.

Scott, James C.

1998 Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press.

Steinmetz, G., ed.

1999 State/Culture: State-Formation after the Cultural Turn. Ithaca, New York and London: Cornell University Press.

Sharma, Aradhana, and Akhil Gupta, eds.

2006 The Anthropology of the State: A Reader. India: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Spencer, Jonathan

2007 Anthropology, Politics, and the State- Democracy and Violence in South Asia. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Anderson, Benedict

1991 Imagined Communities: Reflection on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London and New York: Verso.

Asad, Talal

2003 Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity. Stanford and California: Stanford University Press.

Blom, Hansen Thomas, with Finn Stepputat, George Steinmetz and Julia Adams, eds.

2001States of Imagination: Ethnographic Explorations of the Postcolonial State. Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Bourdieu, Pierre

1977 Outilne of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bourdieu, Pierre

1994 Structures, Habitus, Power: Basis for a Theory of Symbolic Power. InCulture/ Power/ History. Nicholas B. Dirks, et al., eds. Pp. 155-199. Princeton NJ: Princeton.

Chalfin, B.

2006 Enlarging the Anthropology of the State: Global Customs Regimes and the Traffic in Sovereignty. Current Anthropology 47(2):243-276.

Chatterjee, Partha

1995 Religious minorities and the secular state. Public Culture 8:11-39.

Cheater, Angela, ed.

1999 The Anthropology of Power: Empowerment and Disempowerment in Changing Structures. London and New York: Routledge.

Clammer, John

1985 Anthropology and Political Economy. New York: St. Martin’s.

Clastres, Pierre

1977 Society Against the State. New York: Urizen Books.

Cohen, Abner

1981 The Politics of Elite Culture. Berkeley: University of California.

Cohen, Abner

1974 Two-Dimensional Man: An Essay on the Anthropology of Power and Symbolism in Complex Societies. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Cohen, Ronald, and Elman Service, eds.

1978 Origins of the State: The Anthropology of Political Evolution. Philadelphia: ISHI.

Cohen, Ronald and Judith D. Toland, eds.

1988 State Formations and Political Legitimacy. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books.

Comaroff, Jean

1985 Body of power; Spirit of Resistance: The Culture and History of a South Africa People. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Corrigan, Philip, and Derek Sayer

1985 The Great Arch: English State Formation as Cultural Revolution. Oxford: Blackwell.

Dirks, Nicholas B., with GeofEley and Sherry B. Ortner

1994 Culture/Power/History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Donham, Donald

1999 History, Power, Ideology: Central Issues in Marxism and Anthropology. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Ferguson, James, and Akhil Gupta

2002 Spatializing States: Towards an Ethnography of Neoliberal Governmentality. American Ethnologist 29(4):981-1002.

Foucault, Michel

2009 Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the College de France, 1977-1978. New York: St Martins Press.

Gailey, Christine Ward

1987 Kinship to Kingship: Gender Hierarchy and State Formation in the Tongan Islands. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Geertz, Clifford

1973 The Integrative Revolution &Politics Past, Politics Present. In The Interpretation of Cultures. Pp. 255-279 & 326-341. Basic Books.

Gledhill, J.

1994 Power and its Disguises: Anthropological Perspectives of Politics. London: Pluto Press.

Gledhill, J., with B. Bender and M. T. Larson, eds.

1988 State and Society: The Emergence and Development of Social Hierarchy and Political Centralization. London: Routledge.

Gramsci, Antonio

1971 Selections from the Prison Notebooks. Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell Smith, eds. and trans. New York: International Publishers.

Herman, Edward S., and Noam Chomosky

2010 Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media. London: Random House.

Heyman, Josiah McC.

1999 States and Illegal Practices. Oxford: Berg.

Joseph, Gilbert M., and Daniel Nugent, eds.

1994 Everyday forms of State Formation: Revolution and the Negotiation of Rule in Modern Mexico. Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Kapferer, Bruce

2005 New formations of power, the oligarchic-corporate state, and anthropological ideological discourse. Anthropological Theory 5(3):285-299.

Kelly,J.,and M. Kaplan

2001 Nation and decolonization: toward a new anthropology of nationalism. Anthropological Theory1(4).

Krupa, Christopher

2010 State by Proxy: Privatized Government in the Andes. Comparative Studies in Society and History 52(2):319-350.

McGlynn, Frank, and Arthur Tuden, eds.

1991 Anthropological Approaches to Political Behavior. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh.

Martin, Joann

1990 Motherhood and power: the production of a women’s culture of politics in a Mexican community. American Ethnologist 17:470-490.

Maybury-Lewis, D.

1996 Indigenous Peoples, Ethnic Groups, and the State. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Navaro-Yashin, Y.

2002 Faces of the State: secularism and public life in Turkey. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Nordstrom, Carolyn

2004 Shadows of War: Violence, Power, and International Profiteering in the Twenty-First Century. Berkeley: University of California Press.

O’Malley, Pat

1998 Contemporary Rationalities of Government. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Ong, Aihwa

2006 Neoliberalism as Exception: Mutations in Citizenship and Sovereignty. Durham: Duke University Press.

Ong, Aihwa

1999 Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Poggi, G.

1978 The Nineteenth Century Constitutional State. In The Development of the Modern State. Pp. 87-116. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Rose, N.

1996 The Death of the Social? Re-figuring the territory of government. Economy and Society 25(3):327-356.

Sassen, S.

2000 Spatialities and Temporalities of the Global. Public Culture 12(1): 215-232.

Spencer, Jonathan

2007 Anthropology, Politics, and the State: Democracy and Violence in South Asia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Trouillot, M. R.

2001 The Anthropology of the State in the Age of Globalization. Current Anthropology 42(1):125-138.

Vincent, Joan

1990 Anthropology and Politics: Visions, Traditions, and Trends. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Vincent, Joan

2004 The Anthropology of Politics: A Reader in Ethnography, Theory and Critique. London: Wiley Blackwell.

Weber, Max

2009 [1947] Theory of Economic and Social Organization. New York: Free Press.

Wolf, Eric R.

1999 Envisioning Power: Ideologies of Dominance and Crisis. Berkeley: University of California Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 457: ANTHROPOLOGY OF LAW

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course intends to provide the students with an introduction to the study of law and an overview of anthropology’s engagement with human rights and law. It also investigates the discipline’s theoretical and practical engagements with global social justice and law focusing on wider social processes of state regulation, conflict and mass displacement, transnational social movements, and international agencies.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • to explore anthropological perspectives and discourses concerning legal and human rights;
  • to understand the relationship between the epistemological definition and legal codification;
  • to examine a more complex anthropological engagement with legal discourses.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Anthropological Perspectives of Law
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain anthropological perspectives of law;
  • identify major aspects of the methodological aspects of legal anthropology;
  • analyze legal rules and discourses in connection with law and politics.
  • Law defined; classical and post-classical ethnography
  • Methodological tools and techniques of legal anthropology
  • Theories of law: classical and natural law theories
  • Legal rule and discourse, law and politics
6 hrs
Unit-2: Nature and Functions of Law
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain basic functions of law;
  • identify major features of legal and judicial systems;
  • analyze the comparative legal system with a focus on dispute settlement processes.
  • Basic features of law- substantive law, procedural or adjective law, organic and tyrannical law, customary or community law, private and public law, penal law (unwritten law), reinstated contract law
  • Conflicts and cohesions in simple societies
  • Judiciary and legal system, elements of judiciary, social realities through judicial categories
  • Comparative legal system: regularity in law, courts, and legislation, prosecuting authority, case law and settlements of disputes, discourse on the witness
8 hrs
Unit-3: Anthropology and Crime
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain crime;
  • identify major aspects of crime from anthropological perspectives;
  • analyze and critically examine crime and terrorism regarding Bangladesh.
  • Meaning of crime and its typology
  • Society, culture and crime, terrorism.
6 hrs
Unit-4: Anthropology of Law and Environmental and Ecological Issues
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain legal issues related to environment and ecology;
  • identify major aspects of different property rights laws;
  • analyze and critically examine the issues affecting ethnic groups.
  • Indigenous groups, racial and ethnic categories
  • Cultural property, common property resources, intellectual property rights
  • Indigenous law and state law
  • Mineral resources, forests, dams, and water bodies related laws and affected ethnic groups
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Law and Gender
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the connection between law and gender;
  • identify major aspects of jurisprudence;
  • analyze constitutional safeguards for basic rights from a legal anthropological perspective.
  • Jurisprudence, constitution and basic rights
6 hrs
Unit-6: Law and Human Rights
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the connection between law and human rights;
  • identify major features of a war crime, legal issues, and punishment;
  • analyze the performances of law enforcement agencies and legal institutions in a society.
  • Human rights and multicultural negotiations
  • War crime and international law
  • Violation of law, crime, and legal system for punishment
  • Law enforcing agencies, legal institution, and prison
6 hrs
Unit-7: Language, Law, Power, Legal and Political Rituals
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the legal and political rituals of law;
  • identify major anthropological understandings of power in writing and legal pluralism;
  • analyze persons and things and alternative dispute resolution procedures.
  • General nature of ritual
  • Communication of power in writing: representation and construction of social institutions in the administration
  • Legal time and evidence: an ethnographic analysis of narrative, evidence, and proof in different legal cultures
  • Legal pluralism; general nature of ritual
  • Theoretical analyses of modern legal ritual
  • Persons and things: legal forms of personification and objectification in systems of ownership and inheritance
  • Conflicting concepts of ownership
  • Law governing reproductive resources
  • Alternative dispute resolution: arbitration and mediation; collective dispute settlement
8 hrs
Unit-8: Law in Bangladesh Context
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the colonial context to the emergence of various laws;
  • identify major aspects of the legal system of Bangladesh regarding ethnicity;
  • analyze the judicial system of Bangladesh along with a critical understanding of community justice
  • Colonial context to the emergence of various laws
  • Constitution of Bangladesh and basic human rights
  • Bangladesh legal system and ethnicity: historical and contemporary situations
  • Muslim, Hindu, and Christian personal law, Shariah law, other civil laws
  • Community justice in Bangladesh: ‘salish’, ‘fatwa’ and other issues; land rights and legal pluralism
  • The judicial system of Bangladesh: supreme court to lower court, civil, and criminal judicial system.
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Denovan, James M.

2008 Legal Anthropology: An Introduction. London: Altamaria Press.

Goodale, Mark, ed.

2009 Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.

Moore, Sally Falk

1978 Law as Process: An Anthropological Approach. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Moore, Sally Falk, ed.

2005 Law and Anthropology: A Reader. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Pirie, Fernanda

2013 The Anthropology of Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Pospisil, Leopold

1971 Anthropology of Law: A Comparative Theory. New York: Harper and Row.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Bohannan, Paul

1957 Justice and Judgement Among the Tiv. Oxford: Oxford University Press for the International African Institute

Bohanan, Paul

1969 Ethnography and Comparison in Legal Anthropology. In Law in Culture and Society. Laura Nader, ed. Pp. 401-418. Chicago: Adline.

Comaroff, John L., and Simon Roberts

1981 Rules and Processes: The Cultural Logic of Dispute in an African Context. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

Conley, John M., and William M. O’Barr

1990 Rules versus Relationship: The Ethnography of Legal Discourse. Chicago: Chicago University press.

Cowan, Jane K., with Marie-Benedicte Dembour and Richard A. Wilson, eds.

2001 Culture and Rights: Anthropological Perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Fox, Robin

1997 Reproduction and Succession: Studies in Anthropology, Law and Society. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers,

Geertz, Clifford

1983 Local Knowledge: Fact and Law in Comparative Perspective. In Local Knowledge: Further Essays in Interpretive Anthropology. Clifford Geertz, ed. Pp. 167-234. New York: Basic Books.

Gluckman, Max

1965 Politics, Law and Ritual in Tribal Society. Chicago: Aldine

Maine, Henry James Sumner

2002[1866] Ancient Law: Its Connection with Early History of Society, and its Relationto Modern Ideas. London: John Murray.

Merry, Sally Engle

2005 Human Rights and Gender Violence: Translating International Law into Local Justice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Moore, Sally Falk

1989 History and the Redefinition of Custom on Kilimanjaro. In History and Power in the Study of Law: New Directions in Legal Anthropology. June Starr and Jane Collier, eds. Pp. 277-301. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.

Rajagopal, Balakrishnan

2003 International Law From Below: Development, Social Movements, and Third World Resistance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Roberts, Simon

2013[1979] Order and Dispute: An Introduction to Legal Anthropology. Louisiana: Quid Pro Books.

Rouland, Norbert

1994 Legal Anthropology. Philippe G. Planel, trans. London: Athlone Press.

Santos, Boaventura de Sousa

1995 Toward a New Common Sense: Law, Science and Politics in Paradigmatic Transition. New York: Routledge.

Smith, Michael Garfield

1974 Corporations and Society. London: Duckworth.

Starr, June, and Jane F. Collier, eds.

1989 History and Power in the Study of Law: New Directions in Legal Anthropology. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 458: ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD AND NUTRITION

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This course is intended to provide a multidisciplinary, comparative look at the anthropology of food and nutrition. The objective of this course is to give students a thorough grounding with a focus on food as well as nutrition and its relations with culture, religion, food security and sovereignty, hunger, famine, and power. This course will highlight different approaches to the anthropology of food to understand dietary patterns, historical and contemporary food regimes, and commodity chain analyses. It will also analyze hunger, malnutrition and famine, cultures of thinness and fatness, food as a human rights and gender issue, agro-ecology and industrial agriculture, and food-related social movements.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • understand the importance anthropological approach to the study of food and nutrition;
  • examine the relation between food and culture, religion food security and sovereignty, hunger, famine, power, etc;
  • understand the dietary patterns, historical and contemporary food regimes, and commodity chain;
  • analyze hunger, malnutrition and famine, cultures of thinness and fatness, food as a human rights and gender issue, agro-ecology and industrial agriculture, and food-related social movements;

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Anthropological Approaches to Food and Dietary Patterns
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain food as a cultural construction;
  • identify major anthropological approaches to food;
  • analyze food and eating as a social process.
  • Food, cuisine, the social and/or cultural construction of food
4 hrs
Unit-2: Evolution of Human Foodways and Nutrition
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the evolution of human foodways;
  • identify the ways prehistoric people gathered food;
  • analyze how food and eating impacted on human development as a homo sapiens.
  • Evolutionary patterns of food preferences (human and non-human primates)
  • Responses to food stress and surfeit, and the impact of human development
Unit-3: Nutritional Deficiencies, Pathologies, Malnutrition, and Adaptations
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain anthropological perspectives on nutrition;
  • identify understand malnutrition as a political process and related with mainly food distribution;
  • analyze the importance of indigenous knowledge with food and nutrition.
  • Historical and contemporary contexts
  • Women and children as more vulnerable to malnutritional disease; human dealings with malnutrition
  • Human evolved patterns- pica and geophagia, lactose intolerance, poisonous plants, and deficient diets
  • Knowledge of plant-based medicines
Unit-4: Agriculture, Food Production and Human Health
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the emergence of agriculture as a food revolution;
  • identify major aspects to the paradox of food production and malnutrition;
  • analyze the role of women in production and reproduction.
  • Historical contexts of shifting in food practice
  • Increase in malnutrition
  • The production and reproduction of gender roles through the production, preparation, and consumption of food
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Dietary Delocalization, Migration of People and Foods, and Food Regimes
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the colonization of food in the South;
  • identify major issues of the hegemonic presence of Western food in the time globalization.
  • analyze and critically look at the asymmetrical food policy and trade rules of the West.
  • Foods transforming the European world
  • Trade of food and drink permitting colonization and hegemony of Europe over the globe
  • Uneven agricultural trade rules
  • Food regimes genealogy
  • The hangover from the second food regime- the collapse of ‘WTO Doha Round’
  • Vanishing free market- formation and spread of British and US food regime
4 hrs
Unit-6: Cultural Practices and Food Patterns, Cultures of Thinness and Fatness
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain several food behaviors from cultural perspectives;
  • identify the causes of culinary diversity throughout the world despite the homogenizing effort of globalization;
  • analyze the customs, taboos, and beliefs behind food preparation, eating behavior, and critically look at the politics of obesity and secret life in a culture of thinness.
  • Food and global cultural trends
  • Food tradition, modernity, and post-modernity
  • Food and nationalism
  • Food and authenticity in the face of culinary homogenization that global food industries entail; taboos, preferences, and beliefs- why do we eat what we eat?
  • Customs and symbolism of food shaping the role of food preparers
  • Psychopathology as the crystallization of culture, weighty subjects and body politics of fat, secret life in a culture of thinness
8 hrs
Unit-7: Food Sales/Trade, Marketing, and Bioengineering
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the globalization of food such as McDonaldization, KFCdization, Fastfoodization, etc.;
  • identify the role of multinational cooperation in the distribution and marketing of food commodity;
  • analyze the effects of biotechnology in food production, the myth of overproduction, and the political economy of TV cooking shows and its impact on food behavior.
  • Import and export of food: calculating profit and loss
  • Roles of multinational corporations in the production, distribution, and marketing of food commodities
  • Bioengineering affects food safety and the nutritional content of foods
  • Impacts of ‘McDonaldization’, ‘KFCdization’ or ‘Fastfoodization’ of food globally
  • Transmission of ideology through TV cooking shows, cooking-related advertisements, dramas, and many alike
  • The political economy of food
4 hrs
Unit-8: Food Security and Food Sovereignty
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain ideas like food security and food sovereignty;
  • identify major aspects of hunger as a way of making money;
  • analyze the indigenous food system as an alternative to food security and sovereignty.
  • Food problem- theory and policy
  • Issues of food security, malnutrition, and hunger and their relations with resources
  • ‘Hunger’ as a way of making money
  • Origins and potential of food sovereignty
  • The indigenous food security system
4 hrs
Unit-9: Food as a Human Right, Food Justice, and Social Movement
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the connection of food with human right;
  • identify the major focus of food justice;
  • analyze peasants’ right to food and food-based movements.
  • Right to food- gender dimension, global governance, and national implementation
  • Peasants’ rights to food
  • Food crises and food movements- ‘The 20 Million’, ‘The Slow Food Manifesto’
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Cheung, Sidney C. H., and Tan Chee-Beng, eds.

2007 Food and Foodways in Asia: Resource, Tradition and Cooking. New York: Routledge.

Collinson, Paul, and Helen Macbeth, eds.

2014 Food in Zones of Conflict: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives. New York: Berghahn.

Counihan, Carole M.

1999 The Anthropology of Food and Body: Gender, Meaning, and Power. New York: Routledge.

Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik, eds.

2012 Food and Culture: A Reader. New York and London: Routledge.

Fieldhouse, Paul

1986 Food and Nutrition: Customs and Culture. London: Chapman & Hall.

Goodman, Alan H., with Darna L. Dufour and Gretel H. Pelto, eds.

2000 Nutritional Anthropology: Biocultural Perspectives of Food and Nutrition. USA: Mayfield Press.

Macbeth, Helen, and Jeremy MacClancy, eds.

2004 Researching Food Habits: Methods and Problems. New York: Berghahn.

Pelto, Gretel H., Pertti J. Pelto and Ellen Messer

1981 Research Methods in Nutritional Anthropology. Tokyo: The United Nations University.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Adams, C.

1990 The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory. New York: Continuum Press.

Altieri, Miguel A., and Víctor Manuel Toldeo

2011 The agroecological revolution in Latin America: rescuing nature, ensuring food sovereignty and empowering peasants. Journal of Peasant Studies 38(3):587-612.

Babb, F.

  1. Between Field and Cooking Pot: The Political Economy of Market Women in Peru. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Bellows, Anne C., with Veronika Scherbaum, Stefanie Lemke, Anna Jenderedjian and Roseanedo Socorro Gonçalves Viana

2011 Gender-Specific Risks and Accountability: Women, Nutrition and the Right to Food. In Claiming Human Rights: The Accountability Challenge. Léa Winter, ed. Pp. 23-29. Right to Food and Nutrition Watch.

Bittman, Mark

2012 The 20 Million. New York Times, June 12.

Bordo, Susan

1993 Unbearable Weight. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Brown, C.

1993 Consuming Passions: Feminist Approaches to Weight Preoccupation and Eating Disorders. Toronto: Second Story Press.

Bush, Ray

2010 Food Riots: Poverty, Power and Protest. Journal of Agrarian Change 10(1):119-129.

Canfield, Clarke

2012 Food Sovereignty Ordinances: Towns Loosen Reins on Direct-To-Consumer Food Producers. Huffington Post, June 22.

Civitello, Linda

2008 Cuisine and Culture: A History of Food and People. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Cohen, Mark Nathan

1989 Health and the Rise of Human Civilization. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Counihan, Carole M., and Steven L. Kaplan, eds.

2005 Food and Culture: Identity and Power. New York and London: Routledge.

Counihan, Carole M., and Valeria Siniscalchi, eds.

2013 Food Activism: Agency, Democracy and Economy. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing.

Dreze, Jean, and Amartya Sen

1989 Hunger and Public Action. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Erhlich, Elizabeth

1997 Miriam’s Kitchen. New York: Viking Books.

Farb, Peter, and George Amerlagos

1980 Consuming Passions: The Anthropology of Eating. New York: Washington Square Press.

Foster, Nelson, and Linda Cordell

1992 Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas gave the World. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Fuller, Robert C.

1996 Religion and Wine: A Cultural History of Wine Drinking in the United States. Knosville: University of Tennessee Press.

Gabaccia, Donna

1998 Why we Eat What We Eat. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Garine, Igor de, and Valerie de Garine, eds.

2001 Drinking: Anthropological Approaches. New York: Berghahn.

Goody, Jack

1982 Cooking, Cuisine, and Class. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Harris, Marvin

1985 Good to Eat: Riddles of Food and Culture. New York: Waveland Press.

Holt-Giménez, Eric, and Annie Shattuck

2010 Agrofuels and Food Sovereignty: Another Agrarian Transition. In Food Sovereignty: Reconnecting Food, Nature and Community. Annette A. Desmarais, Nettie Wiebe, and Hannah Wittman, eds. Pp. 76-90. Halifax: Fernwood.

Howard, Mary, and Ann Ferguson

1997 Hunger and Shame. New York: Routledge Press.

Ishii-Eiteman, Marcia

2009 Food Sovereignty and the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development. Journal of Peasant Studies 36(3):689-700.

Macbeth, Helen

1997 Food Preferences and Taste: Continuity and Change. New York: Berghahn.

McMichael, Philip

2009 A food regime genealogy. Journal of Peasant Studies 36(1):139-169.

McMillen, Della, ed.

1991 Anthropology and Food Policy. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Mintz, Sidney W.

1985 Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Viking Books.

Mintz, Sidney W., and Christine M. Du Bois

2002 The Anthropology of Food and Eating. Annual Reviews Anthropology 31:99-119.

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHNES)

2007 Anthropometry Procedures Manual. Atlanta: CDC-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Paarlberg, Robert

2010 Food Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Inc.

Patel, Raj

2009 What does food sovereignty look like? Journal of Peasant Studies 36(3):663-673.

Portinari, Folco

1989 The Slow Food Manifesto. New York: Slow Food USA.

Pritchard, Bill

2009 The Long Hangover from the Second Food Regime: A World-Historical Interpretation of the Collapse of the WTO Doha Round. Agriculture and Human Values26(4):297-307.

Schlosser, Eric

2001 Fast Food Nation. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin.

Schwartz, Hillel

1986 Never Satisfied: A Cultural History of Diets, Fantasies, and Fat. New York: Free Press.

Sen, Amartya

1982 The Food Problem: Theory and Policy. Third World Quarterly 4(3):447-459.

Stone, Glenn Davis

2010 The Anthropology of Genetically Modified Crops. Annual Reviews Anthropology 39:381-400.

Tillman-Healy, Lisa M.

1996 A Secret Life in a Culture of Thinness: Reflections on Body, Food, and Bulimia. In Composing Ethnography: Alternative Forms of Qualitative Writing. Carolyn Ellis and Arthur P. Bochner, eds. Pp. 76-108. Walnut Creek, Calif.: Altamira Press-Sage Publications.

Visser, Margaret

1992 The Rituals of Dinner. New York: Penguin Books.

Weasel, Lisa H.

2009 Food Fray: Inside the Controversy of Genetically Modified Food. New York: AMACOM-American Management Association.

Winders, Bill

2009 The Vanishing Free Market: The Formation and Spread of the British and US Food Regimes. Journal of Agrarian Change 9(3):315-344.

Schiefenhövel, Wulf, and Helen Macbeth, eds.

2011 Liquid Bread: Beer and Brewing in Cross-Cultural Perspective. New York: Berghahn.

Zuckerman, Larry

1998 The Potato: How the Humble Spud Rescued the Western World. New York: North Point Press.

FILMS AND DOCUMENTARIES

FILM

Arau, Alfonso, dir.

1992 Like Water for Chocolate.110 min. Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures.

Axel, Gabriel, dir.

1987 Babette’s Feast. 110 min. Danish Film Institute.

DOCUMENTARIES

NHANES, dir.

2010 NHANES III: Anthropometric Procedures (Part 1 to 10). Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Potash, Shira, and Yoav Potash, dirs.

2010 Food Stamped. 60 min. USA.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 459: RESEARCH MONOGRAPH

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to engage students in the field taking experiences gathered from the first, second, and third year of fieldwork. This course will provide an approach to common concepts and methodologies in anthropology relating to ethnographic fieldwork. At the end of the fieldwork, students will have to write the research monograph. This is a 4 credit course equivalent to 100 marks.  and the examination of the Research Monograph has two parts: an examination of the written monograph (80 marks) and viva-voce (20 marks).

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Obtain practical orientation to the procedures of field research;
  • Understand the procedures followed to conduct fieldwork;
  • Gain the ability to relate their theoretical and methodological understandings with the field;
  • Write a complete research monograph and appear in a viva-voce examination to test and examine the research work and research monograph.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: General Rules and Regulations
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain the concepts of field and fieldwork in anthropology;
  • identify various aspects of fieldwork in anthropology;
  • analyze and critically discuss the current debates of fieldwork.
  • Preparing a research proposal
  • Selection of students and supervisors
  • Presentation of research proposal in a defense class for review and comments
  • The structure of the research proposal should be aligned with the following guidelines (at least 5000 words of length):
    1. Title of the Research
    2. Introduction
    3. Background and Context of the Research
    4. Theoretical/ Conceptual/ Analytical Framework
    5. Statement of the Problem
    6. Research Objectives
    7. The rationale of the Research
    8. The methodology of the Research
    9. Thematic Divisions of the Research Report
    10. References
  • Writing and defense of the proposal and selection of the supervisors will be completed during 4th year 7th semester
  • Conducting fieldwork and submitting research monograph before 4th year 8th semester final examination.
Unit-2: Fieldwork Issues
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain anthropological knowledge for ethnographic fieldwork of different issues;
  • identify different problems faced by people in society;
  • analyze the learning from the field.
  • Livelihood in rural and urban societies and migration
  • Community, consumption, and economy
  • Basic human rights
  • Ecology, environment and sustainable development
  • People of different cultures and ethnic origins
  • Exploration of livelihood
  • Understanding social institutions and the community
  • Kinship, gender, and social issues
  • Climate change, disaster, and development
  • Anthropological study of every aspect of human being, society, culture, economy, and politics
  • Subjectivity, reflexivity, and fieldwork relationship
  • Ethical challenges and ways of addressing these challenges
  • Issues related to medical anthropology
2 hrs
Unit-3: Conducting Fieldwork
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain fieldwork planning in connection with fieldwork issues;
  • identify salient features of the community studied in the field;
  • analyze and learn to utilize theoretical and methodological understandings to organize fieldwork.
  • Fieldwork planning, preparation, and selection of topic
  • Going to the field
  • Conducting fieldwork through using different anthropological research methods
  • Data collection, checking, coding, decoding, and finalization of data
  • Learning to grasp the untold stories from the field to cover fieldwork issues
  • Return from the field
20 hrs
Unit-4: Presentation of Field Data and Report Writing
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain data from the field and fieldwork experiences;
  • identify the strengths and weaknesses of the fieldwork;
  • analyze and critically discuss the field situation based on data obtained from the field.
  • The process of data generation
  • Tabulation and summarization
  • Data analysis
  • Presentation of the findings
  • Research monograph writing following guidelines
2 hrs
Unit-5: Oral Test (Viva-voce)
  • At the end of this unit, students will be able to-
  • explain and communicate effectively on the topics covered by the fieldwork;
  • identify major findings from the fieldwork;
  • analyze and apply reflective analysis to theoretical and applied contexts.
  • Oral defense on the findings from the field
2 hrs

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.

ASSESSMENT

Class attendance, Fieldwork report, Oral test (viva-voce).

REFERENCES

REQUIRED TEXT

Bernard, Harvey Russell

2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.

Fetterman, D. M.

2009 Ethnography: Step-by-step (Vol. 17). Sage Publications.

ADDITIONAL TEXT

Bryman, Alan, ed.

2001 Ethnography (4 Volumes). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

Gusterson, Hugh. ed.

2008 Ethnographic Research. In A Pluralist Guide to Qualitative Methods in International Relations. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 115-142.

Clifford, James

1983 On Ethnographic Authority. Representations 1, pp. 118-146.

Bourgois, Philippe

1990 Confronting Anthropological Ethics: Ethnographic Lessons from Central America. Journal of Peace Research 27, pp 43-54.

Warren, Kay B. ed.

2001 Telling Truths. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 198-218.

Montejo, Victor D. ed.

2001 Truth, Human Rights, and Representation. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 372-91.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 460: COMPREHENSIVE AND VIVA-VOCE

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course Comprehensive and Viva-Voce has two parts: written comprehensive (50 marks) and oral defense (50 marks). Students will sit for this Comprehensive and Viva-Voce examination during 8th semester of the BSS Honors program. It will test their learning over the last 4 years of the undergraduate program.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Examination of students’ learning from 1st to 8th semesters through a written examination;
  • Judging their analytical skills through a viva-voce examination;
  • A comprehensive understanding of the students learning during BSS (Honors) courses.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • The students can explain anthropological concepts and idea
  • Identify and analyze anthropological theories, point of divergences and origin, their interrelations, contradictions, and mutuality; as well as applications of anthropological theories
  • Use anthropological concepts and theories in analyzing and evaluating social context
  • Will be able to critically judge concepts and theories in terms of their potential applicability in diverse social situations

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.

ASSESSMENT

Written examination, Oral test (viva-voce).

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour