Coures
COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 501: CONTEMPORARY ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORIES

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to make students familiar with some of the theories formulated in the field of anthropology over the last few decades. Emphasis has been given to understand the contributions from post-modern, feminist, neo-liberal, and post-colonial thinkers in anthropology.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand different versions of practice theory;
  • Examine Gramscianidealism and neo-Straussianstructuralism;
  • Interpret post-modern psychoanalytic cultural and contemporary feminist theories;
  • Focus on neo-liberal and theories of new science and technology;
  • Critical understanding of post-colonial and subaltern perspectives and actor-network theory.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Practice Theory
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explainthe basic argument of practice theory;
  • identifybasic features of early, later, and a new version of practice theories;
  • analyze practice theories in the context of own society and culture.
  • Early practice theorists- Pierre Bourdieu, Anthony Giddens, and Marshall Sahlins
  • Later practice theorists- Charles Taylor, William H. Sewell Jr.
  • Sherry B. Ortner’s version of practice theory and its update
4hrs
Unit-2: Gramscian Idealism and Neo- Straussian Structuralism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the basic argument of Gramsci and neo-Strauss;
  • identify basic features of idealism and neo-Straussian structuralism;
  • analyzethe way idealism and neo-Straussian structuralism provide an understanding of human thinking.
  • Gramsci’s theories on idealism
  • Neo-Straussian structuralism
4 hrs
Unit-3: Post-modern Psychoanalytic Cultural Theorists
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • Explain the concepts of post-modern psychoanalysis of culture;
  • identify major issues raised by post-modern psychoanalytic cultural theorists;
  • analyzepsychoanalytic cultural theories with human experiences.
  • Gilles Deleuze
  • Felix Guattari
  • Sherry Turkle
  • Jean-Francois Lyotard
8hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Feminists in the 1990s and 21st Century
Unit-4: Feminists in the 1990s and 21stCentury

At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical contexts of feminism;
  • identify major aspects of 1990s feminism and its development in the 21st century;
  • analyze feminist thinking of society and culture.
  • Lila Abu-Lughod
  • Rayna Rapp
  • Micaela Di Leonardo
  • Judith Butler
8hrs
Unit-5: Neo-liberalism and David Harvey
Unit-5: Neo-liberalism and David Harvey

At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain modernity and post-modernity;
  • identify the causes of transformations in the late 20th century theoretical understandings;
  • analyze these late 20th centuries neo-liberal theories.
  • From modernity to post-modernity
  • Transformations in the late 20th-century capitalism, Fordism, and flexible accumulation
  • Time-space compression, new imperialism, the enigma of capital
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Theories of New Science and Technology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of new science and technology;
  • identify the basic features of transition in the theories of new science and technology;
  • analyze capitalism, informationalism, and new work and employment strategies based on the transitions in science and technology in society.
  • Manuel Castells- restructuring of capitalism
  • The transition from industrialism to informationalism and the rise of the business network
  • Transformation of work and employment
4 hrs
Unit-7: Postcolonial Thinkers
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the ideas developed by the postcolonial thinkers;
  • identify major issues raised by the postcolonial thinkers;
  • analyze the significances of postcolonial thinking.
  • Edward Said
  • Talal Asad
  • Homi Bhaba
  • Dipesh Chakrabarty
  • James Clifford
8 hrs
Unit-8: Subaltern Theorists
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the ideas developed by the subaltern thinkers;
  • identify major issues raised by the subaltern thinkers;
  • analyze the significances of subaltern thinkers.
  • Ranajit Guha
  • Gayotri Chakraborti Spivak
  • Partha Chaterjee
8 hrs
Unit-9: Actor-Network Theory
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain actor-network theory;
  • identify the basic features of actor-network theory;
  • analyze Latour’s thinking on actor-network theory.
  • Bruno Latour
4 hrs

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Castree, Noel, and Derek Gregory, eds.
2006 David Harvey: A Critical Reader. Oxford: Blackwell-Publishing.
Castells, Manuel
2000 The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture. Oxford: Blackwell
Castells, Manuel
2010 The Rise of Network Society (vols 1,2 &3).Malden, MA: Wilie-Blackwell
Guha, Ranajit
1988 An Indian Historiography of India. Calcutta: K. P. Bagchi& Company.
Latour, Bruno, and Steve Woolgar
1979 Laboratory Life: The social Construction of Scientific Facts. London: Sage.
Leonardo, Micaela Di, eds.
1991 Gender at Cross Roads of Knowledge: Feminist Anthropology in the Post-modern Era. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Ortner, Sherry B.
2006 Anthropology and Social Theory. Durham and London: Duke University Press.
Reyna, Stephen P.
2002 Connections: Brain, Mind and Culture in a Social Anthropology. London: Routledge.
Smith, Philip
2001 Cultural Theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers Ltd.
Spivak, GayatriChakravorty
1986 Can the subaltern speak? In Marxism and the Interpretations of Culture. Cary Nelson and Laurence Grossberg, eds. Pp. 271-313. Indiana: University of Indianan Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT
Abu-Lughod, Lila
1993 Writing Women’s Worlds: Bedouin Stories. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Butler, Judith
1990 Gender Trouble. New York: Routledge.
Butler, Judith
1993 Bodies that Matter. London: Routledge.
Chatterjee, Partha
1993 The Nation and its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Chatterjee, Partha
1997 Our Modernity. Rotterdam/Dakar: SephisandCodesria.
Guha, Ranajit
1998 Dominance without Hegemony. Harvard: Harvard University Press.
Guha, Ranajit
2002 History at the Limit of World-History. Columbia: Columbia University Press.
Harvey, David
2005 A Brief History of Neoliberalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Latour, Bruno
1991 We Have Never Been Modern. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Rapp, Rayna
1999 Testing Women, Testing the Fetus. NY: Routledge
Strathern, Marilyn
1988 The Gender of the Gift. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Williams, Patrick, and Laura Chris man, eds.
1993 Colonial Discourse and Post-Colonial Theory: A Reader. Hemel Hemp stead: Harvester Wheat sheaf.

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
The course is designed to make students familiar with the advanced research methods in anthropology. Emphasis has been given to highlight the epistemological issues, critical thinking, and scientific and post-scientific analysis in anthropology.
COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand epistemological foundations of research method;
  • Examine critical thinking and antiscientific orientations of anthropological research;
  • Interpret feminist methodology, textual analysis, and discourse analysis;
  • Analyze scientific issues of scaling and multivariate analysis.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Epistemological Foundation of Research Methods
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain epistemology and philosophy of research methods;
  • identify basic features of epistemological foundations of research methods;
  • analyze the nature of theorizing in anthropology.
  • Philosophy and social sciences
  • Theory of knowledge
  • Nature of theorizing in anthropology
8 hrs
Unit-2: Critical Thinking
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of critical thinking;
  • identify basic features of critical thinking and reactions against scientific rationality;
  • analyze a critical understanding of science through feminist and post-modernist thinking.
  • The reaction against scientific rationality
  • Science as a cultural system
  • Social constructionism
  • Critiques of science- feminist, post-modern, post-structuralist and post-colonial
8 hrs
Unit-3: Feminist Methodology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • Explain the concepts of feminist methodology;
  • identify major features of feminist methodology;
  • analyze feminist standpoint and reflexivity in the research process.
  • Feminists’ conception of methodology and its characteristics
  • Feminist standpoint- competing paths to truth, politics of difference, putting reflexivity in the research process
8 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Patterns of Analysis
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the patterns of analysis in anthropological research;
  • identify major aspects of different analysis methods;
  • analyze the patterns of analysis with critiques.
  • Componential analysis- processes and problems, analysis from ethnography
  • Text analysis- interpretive, performance, conversation, and schema analysis, grounded theory, content analysis, and analytic induction
  • Discourse analysis- definition, discourse, and society, discourse and power/knowledge, discourse and conversation, multimodal discourse analysis, critical discourse analysis, reflexivity and critiques
8 hrs
 
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Scales and Scaling
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain scales and scaling in anthropological research;
  • identify major aspects of scaling;
  • analyze scaling and its use in anthropological research.
  • Simple and complex scales, indexes, Guttman scale, Likert scale
  • Testing for unidimensionality with factor analysis
8 hrs
Unit-6: Multivariate Analysis
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of multivariate analysis;
  • identify the basic features of multivariate analysis;
  • analyze the complex table, regression, multidimensional scaling, and their uses in anthropological research.
  • Building a complex table, multiple regression, and path analysis
  • Factor analysis and multidimensional scaling
8 hrs
Unit-7: Appreciative Inquiry
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of appreciative inquiry;
  • identify basic features of appreciative inquiry;
  • analyze the techniques of monitoring and evaluation.
  • History, theory, and research
  • Techniques of monitoring and evaluation
8 hrs

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Basham, Greg
2002 Critical Thinking: A Students Introduction. New York: McGraw- Hill Companies, Inc.
Bernard, Russell
2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.
Bryman, Alan
2004 Social Research Method. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Crib, Ian
2001 Philosophy of Social Sciences: The Philosophical Foundations of Social Thought. New York: Palgrave.
Elliot, A.C., and, Wayne A. Woodword
2007 Statistical Analysis. London: Sage.
Fairclough, N.
2003 Analyzing Discourse. New York: Routledge.
Gee, James Paul
1999 An Introduction to Discourse Analysis. London: Routledge.
Habermas, Jurgen
1988 On the Logic of Social Sciences. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Harding, Sandra
1986 The Science Question in Feminism. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.
 
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Alcoff, Linda, and Potter Elizabeth
1993 Feminist Epistemologies. London: Routledge.
Bernard, Russell, ed.
1998 Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Walnut Creek: Altamira Press.
Denzin, Norman K.
2000 Handbook of Qualitative Research. California: Sage Publications Inc.
Duranti, Alessandro, and Charles Goodwin, eds.
1992 Rethinking Context: Language as an Interactive Phenomenon. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Kuhn, Thomas
1970 Structure of Scientific Revolution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Lakatos, Imre, and Alan Musgrave
1970 Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Ramazanoglu, Caroline, and Janet Harold
2002 Feminist Methodology: Challenges and Choices. London: Sage Publications.
Seale, Clive, with David Silverman, Jaber F. Gubrium and Giampietro Gobo, eds.
2007 Qualitative Research Practice. London: Sage Publications.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 503: ANTHROPOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
The course is designed to expose the students to the ethnographic knowledge of how anthropology analyzes issues such as rural poverty, environmental degradation, and the globalization of trade. Emphasis has been given to the critiques of development theory, projects, and methods used by anthropologists to study development projects. The course also intends to orient students to the knowledge related to environment and development.
COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the development, third world, and development aid;
  • Develop an analytical foundation on the approaches and theories of development, sustainable development, and nature-society relationship;
  • Examine environmental crisis and failures of international development assistance;
  • Interpret the nature of economic and social changes in post-colonial societies and underdeveloped areas in the West/North through ethnographic materials and case-studies;
  • Critical analysis of the policies and programs of sustainable development;
  • Extend an overview of the literature on political ecology, rural livelihoods research, and environmental management issues.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction to Anthropology of Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history of anthropology and development;
  • identify basic features of development anthropology and anthropology of development;
  • analyze basic issues of development through anthropological understanding.
  • Development anthropology and anthropology of development
  • History of anthropology and development
8 hrs
Unit-2: Theories of Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the theories of development;
  • identify major aspects of development theories;
  • analyze economic development as a discourse and representation.
  • Economic development as a discourse and representation
8 hrs
Unit-3: Sustainable Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • Explain the concept of sustainable development and its history;
  • identify major features of sustainable development;
  • analyze political ecology, global environmental changes, and sustainable development through a critical anthropological lens.
  • History and critique of the concept
  • political ecology approach to global environmental changes and development
8 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Culture Centered Approaches
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain culture-centered approaches to development;
  • identify major aspects of cultural perspectives for development;
  • analyze policies and planning for development through culture-centered approaches.
  • Development as freedom, movement, and aspiration
  • I mplications of cultural perspectives for public policy and development planning
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Research Strategies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain research strategies for development studies;
  • identify major aspects of different types of research strategies;
  • analyze participatory approaches for development research.
  • Action research, participatory approaches, and development planning
8 hrs
Unit-6: Entrepreneurship and Poverty Reduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain entrepreneurship;
  • identify major aspects of entrepreneurship for poverty reduction;
  • analyze the importance of finance and entrepreneurship for poverty reduction.
  • Entrepreneurship in the rural area
  • Poverty reduction through entrepreneurship and the importance of finance
8 hrs
Unit-7: Issues of Development in Bangladesh and Case Studies of Successful Interventions
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the issues of development in Bangladesh;
  • identify institutions to provide successful interventions for development in Bangladesh;
  • analyze different case studies of successful interventions.
  • Development programs and interventions by GO, NGO, and grassroots organizations
  • Successful Interventions by PKSF, GRAMEEN BANK, BRAC, ASA, BARD, BRDB
8 hrs

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Allen, T., and A. Thomas
2000 Poverty and Development into the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
Chambers, Robert
2008 Revolutions in Development Inquiry. Earthscan, London: Routledge.
Ervin, A. M.
2000 Applied Anthropology: Tools and Perspectives for Contemporary Practice. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Gardner, Katy, and David Lewis
1996 Anthropology, Development and the Post-modern Challenge. London: Pluto Press.
Hobart, M., ed.
1993 An Anthropological Critique of Development. London: Routledge.
Mikkelsen, B. H.
1995 Methods for Development Work and Research: A Guide for Practitioners. London: Sage Publications.
Mosse, David, and David Lewis
2005 The Aid Effect: Ethnographies of Development Practice and Neo-liberal Reform. London: Pluto Press.
Nolan, R.
2002 Development Anthropology: Encounters in the Real World. Boulder: Westview Press.
Peet, Richard
1999 Theories of Development. New York: Guilford Press.
Pieterse, Nederveen
2001 Development Theory: Deconstruction/ Reconstructions. London: Sage Publications.
Porter, D., with B.  Allen and G. Thompson
1991 Development in Practice: Paved With Good Intentions. London: Routledge.
Rahnema, M., and V. Bawtree
1995The Post-Development Reader. London and New Jersey: Zed Books.
Rahnema, Majid, and Victoria Bawtree
1997 The Post-Development Reader. Dhaka: University Press Limited.
Sachs, Wolfgang, ed.
1993 Global Ecology: A new Arena of Political Conflict. London: Zed Books.
Sen, Amartya
1999Development as Freedom. New York: Anchor Books.
Stone, M. Priscilla
2003 Is Sustainability for development anthropologists? Human Organization 62(2):93-99.
Vayda, Andrew Peter
2009 Explaining Human Actions and Environmental Changes. Lanham, MD: Altamira Press.
 
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Chambers, Robert
1983 Rural Development: Putting the Last First.  London: Longman.
Cernea, M.
1997The Risks and Reconstruction Model for Resettling Displaced Populations. World Development 25(10):1569-87.
Cernea, M., and S. Guggenheim, eds.
1993Anthropological Approaches to Resettlement: Policy, Practice and Theory. Boulder: Westview.
Chang, Ha- Joon, ed.
2003Rethinking Development Economics. London: Anthem.
Croll, Elizabeth
2000 Endangered Daughters: Discrimination and development in Asia. London: Routledge.
Escobar, Arturo
1995 Encountering Development. The Making and Unmaking of the Third World. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Ferguson, James
1990 The Anti-Politics Machine: “Development”, Depoliticization, and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Gewertz, Deborah B., and Frederick R. Errington
1991 Twisted Histories, Altered Contexts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Harper, Janice
2002 Endangered Species: Health, Illness, and Death among Madagascar’s People of the Forest. Carolina: Carolina Academic Press.
Hodgson, D. L.
2002 Once intrepid warriors: gender, ethnicity, and the cultural politics of Maasai development. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
Holmes-Eber, Paula
2003 Daughters of Tunisia: Women, Family and Networks in a Muslim City. Oxford, UK: Westeview Press.
Indra, D., ed.
1999Engendering Forced Migration: Theory and Practice. Oxford: Bergahn.
Kabeer, Naila
1994 Reversed Realities: Gender Hierarchies in Development Thought. New York: Verso.
Kleinen, J.
1999 Facing the Future, Reviving the Past: A study of social change in a Northern Vietnamese Village. Singapore: Institute for Southeast Asian Studies.
Little, Paul E.
1999 Environments and environmentalisms in anthropological research:  Facing a new millennium.  Annual Review of Anthropology 28:253-84.
McCabe, J. Terrence
2003 Toward an anthropological understanding of sustainability:  A Preface.  Human Organization 62(2):91-92.
Middleton, N., and P. O’Keefe
2001 Redefining Sustainable Development. London: Pluto Press.
Moghadam, Valentine M.
2007 Gender and the Global Economy. In The Globalization and Development Reader. R. J. Timmons and A. Hite, eds. Pp. 135-151. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
Molyneux, Maxine
2002 Gender and the silences of social capital:  Lessons from Latin America.  Development and Change 33(2):167-88.
Mosse, David, with J. Farrington and A. Rew, eds.
1998 Development As Process: Concepts and Methods for Working With Complexity. London: Routledge.
Mosse, David
2003 Texts and Tribals: Inside an Overseas Aid Project. London: Pluto Press.
Mosse, David
2005 Cultivating Development. London: Pluto Press.
Nash, J.C.
2001 Mayan Visions: The Quest for Autonomy in an Age of Globalization. London: Routledge.
Norgaard, R.
1994 Development Betrayed. London: Routledge.
Roberts, J. Timmons, and Ammy Hite, eds.
2007 Globalization and Development Reader. Malden, M.A.: Blackwell.
Roberts, J. Timmons, and Ammy Hite
2000 From Modernization to Globalization: Perspectives on Development and Social Change. Oxford: Blackwell.
Rigg, Jonathan
1997Southeast Asia: The Human Landscape of Modernization and Development. London: Routledge.
Rist, Gilbert
2003 The History of Development: From Western Origins to Global Faith. London: Zed Books.
Sachs, Wolfgang
1999 Planetary Dialectics: Explorations in environment and development. London: Zed Books.
Schroeder, Richard A.
1999 Shady practices: agroforestry and gender politics in the Gambia. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Shiva, Vandana
2002Water Wars; Privatization, Pollution, and Profit. Cambridge Massachusetts: South End Press.
Sunkel, Osvaldo
2005 The unbearable lightness of neoliberalism. In Rethinking Development in Latin America. Charles H. Wood and Bryan R. Roberts, eds. Pp. 55-78. University Park:  Pennsylvania State University Press.
Swartley, Lynn
2002  Inventing Indigenous Knowledge. London: Routledge.
Wolf, Eric R.
1982 Europe and the People without History. Berkeley: University of California Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 504: INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to expose the students to an understanding of indigenous knowledge. Emphasis has been given to analyze the impact of rapid modernization on indigenous knowledge. The course also intends to orient students about the importance of studying the practical applications of the hidden transcript of knowledge.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the definition and nomenclature of indigenous knowledge;
  • Develop an analytical foundation through analyzing theoretical foundations and methodological issues;
  • Examine the importance of studying indigenous knowledge from different sectoral perspectives.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Defining Indigenous Knowledge
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the definition, history, and nomenclature of indigenous knowledge;
  • identify basic features of indigenous knowledge;
  • analyze basic issues, scope, and importance of studying indigenous knowledge.
  • Definition
  • Nomenclature
  • Scope and importance
8 hrs
Unit-2: Theoretical Foundation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the theories related to indigenous knowledge;
  • identify major aspects of the research paradigm in indigenous knowledge;
  • analyze the application of indigenous knowledge.
  • Theoretical foundation
  • Research paradigm and application
8 hrs
Unit-3: Methodological Issues
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the methodological issues to study indigenous knowledge;
  • identify major methodological concerns to study indigenous knowledge;
  • analyze the documentation processes and the use of the methodology in studying indigenous knowledge.
  • Methodological issues
  • Information documentation
8 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Indigenous Knowledge and Environment
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the indigenous knowledge and environment nexus;
  • identify the use of indigenous knowledge in agriculture, land, forest, biodiversity conservation, and natural resources management;
  • analyze the application of indigenous knowledge in sustainable environmental management.
  • Agriculture, land, and forest
  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Water and watershed management
  • Natural resources management
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Indigenous Knowledge and Health
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the engagement of indigenous knowledge in health and biology;
  • identify major aspects of the sectors of health and food security through indigenous knowledge;
  • analyze the application of indigenous knowledge in sustainable health management.
  • Health and biology
  • Food security
8 hrs
Unit-6: Indigenous Knowledge and Disaster Management
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the engagement of indigenous knowledge with disaster study;
  • identify major aspects of the perception and prediction of disaster;
  • analyze the importance of indigenous perception, prediction of disaster management, and indigenous survival strategies.
  • Indigenous perception and prediction of disaster management
  • Survival strategies and indigenous knowledge
8 hrs
Unit-7: Selected Case Studies of the Application of Indigenous Knowledge
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the basic aspects of the case studies for indigenous knowledge;
  • identify major focus the case studies;
  • analyze different case studies of successful interventions through indigenous knowledge in the sectors of environment, health, and disaster management.
  • Selected case studies on indigenous knowledge from Bangladesh and around the world
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Hassan, Shahed
2015 On Nature and Knowledge. Montreal, Canada: Media Ariel and Publications.
Khan, N. A., and S. Sen, eds.
2000 Of Popular Wisdom: Indigenous Knowledge and Practices in Bangladesh. Dhaka: BARCIK.
Sillitoe, Paul, ed.
2000 Indigenous Knowledge Development in Bangladesh: Present and Future. London: Intermediate Technology Publications.
Sillitoe, Paul
1998 The Development of Indigenous Knowledge: A New Applied Anthropology. Current Anthropology39(2):223-52.

ADDITIONAL TEXT
Agarwal, A.
1995 Dismantling the device between Indigenous and Scientific Knowledge. Development and Change26:413-39.
Brokensha, D., with D. Warrenand O. Werner, eds.
1980 Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Development. Lanham, MD: University Press of America.
Johson, Martha, ed.
1992 Lore: Capturing Traditional Environmental Knowledge. Ottawa: International Development Research Centre.
Narayan, D.
1996 Toward Participatory Research.Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
Swartley, Lynn
2002  Inventing Indigenous Knowledge. London: Routledge.
Warren, D. M., with L. Jan Silkkerveer and D. Brokensha, eds.
1995 The Cultural Dimension of Development: Indigenous Knowledge Systems. London: Intermediate Technology Publications.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 505: VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

The course is designed to explore the theories and paradigms in visual anthropology by highlighting the artistic/ aesthetic, social scientific, commercial, and political agendas that influence the production of various forms of visual document. Starting from the colonial exhibition of ‘exotic natives’, the course further intends to proceed through photography to classic and contemporary ethnographic film, art, and documentaries with a special focus on Flaherty, Mead, Gardner, Rouch, and MacDougall. The course also offers students practical training in photography and videography.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Understand photographs, art, painting, and film show and their usages;
  • Know how Western culture uses images of non-Western peoples, and the debates about how non-Western peoples use images of themselves;
  • Understand the status of visual in contemporary Western society and the social sciences;
  • Analyze the bias and stereotypes, stylistic conventions, scientific, commercial, and political agendas influence the choice of recorded images;
  • Know how a visual component can be a valuable part of most ethnographic field projects and what makes a photograph or a film ethnographic.UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT
Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction to the Field of Visual Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of visual anthropology;
  • identify basic features of visual anthropology;
  • analyze the role and challenges of anthropological knowledge of images and vision.
  • What is visual anthropology and what it should be?
  • What is the role of vision and image in the ethnographic investigation?
  • I n what respects images convey culture and what challenges does this pose for conventional anthropological knowledge?
4 Hrs
Unit-2: Development of Anthropology and Visual Anthropology: The Easy/Uneasy Relationships
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different phases of the development of visual anthropology;
  • identify the major focus of these phases;
  • analyze the relationship between anthropology and visual anthropology from theoretical perspectives.
  • Phase 1: 1880-1920: Alfred Cort Haddon, Baldwin Spencer & Frank Gillen, Franz Boas, Bronislaw Kasper Malinowski, A.R. Radcliffe Brown, Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead
  • Phase 2: 1920-1980: Evans Pritchard, Paul Stirlings, Julian Pitt Rivers, Margaret Mead & Gregory Bateson, John Marshal, Robert Gardner, Jean Rouch
  • Phase 3: 1980-to date: Ruby Jay, Tim Asch, Napoleon Chagnon, James Clifford, David McDougall, Karl Heider, Sarah Pink, Paul Hockings, Edgar Morin, Grinshow, David MacDougall, and many others
  • Other’s Contribution: Sol Worth, Dell Hymes, Saussure, Foucault, Levi-Strauss, Pierre Bourdieu, Stuart Hall, Noam Chomsky, Theodor Adorno, Ronald Bathes, Antonio Gramsci, Hebermas, Walter Benjamin, Max Horkheimer, Clifford Geertz, Susan Sontag, Maxwell McComb, Edward S. Herman, and others
6 hrs
Unit-3: Visual in Ethnography
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of visual ethnography;
  • identify major methodological concerns of visual ethnography;
  • analyze the pattern of visuality, visibility, and social theories.
  • Planning and Practicing Visual Methods in Social Science: Visuality, visibility and Social Theory/Visibility, Democracy and the Public: the new media
4 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Visual Manifestation/ Visual Texts/Visual Manipulation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of visual text and manifestation;
  • identify major features of visual text and the media used for this;
  • analyze the application of visual text with examples.
  • Photograph, selfies, film, documentary, painting, sculpture, advertisement, cartoon, graphic arts, sketch, pictogram, digital/hypermedia (CD-ROM, DVD, website, youtube, webmail, Facebook and other social media, multimedia combining printed words, photographs, and motion pictures), museum object, art, artifact, gesture, dress, body adornment as a cultural phenomenon, dance, drama, mime and other performing arts, architecture, and other natural and constructed /built environments
4 hrs
Unit-5: Visual Anthropology, Colonialism, and Situating Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain visual anthropology from colonial perspectives;
  • identify major issues related to colonialism and visual anthropology;
  • analyze the application of visual anthropology situating Bangladesh.
  • Introducing Visual Anthropology and Colonialism and ‘Exhibited Others’
  • Study of Visual Anthropology: Situating Bangladesh in the Global Context
4 hrs
Unit-6: Researching with a Camera/ Trouble with Photography
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of research using visual methods;
  • identify different tools and techniques of audiovisual anthropology;
  • analyze the importance of visual and ethnographic documentary to understand research with a camera.
  • Visual Translation of Cultural Reality: Ethnographic Documentary: Seeing is believing, Showing the seeing, Positivist logic of objective visibility and its dilemma
  • Unit of Analysis: Process and the context: the relationships of producer-process-product and reader/viewer/consumer, ethnological documentary to audiovisual anthropology
  • Tools and techniques of audiovisual anthropology: film, photography, video-research, electronic media, etc., and ethics of image-making
6 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-7: Theories to Understand Image, Visual Politics, and Classical Approaches
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain theories to understand image;
  • identify major issues of different theories on image and visual politics;
  • analyze classical approaches and contemporary concepts of image and visual politics.
  • Of Marx or Dubois, contemporary concepts- Hall, Bhabha, Lacan, Barthes, Chomsky or Baudrillard
8 hrs
Unit-8: Making and Unmaking of Reality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain visual culture and society;
  • identify different aspects of visual culture, media, and society;
  • analyze the reality of nationalism and diaspora in terms of visual culture, media, and society.
  • Visual Culture, Media and Society: Ethnicity, Identity, Gender, Sexuality, Nationalism, and Diaspora in a Globalized Context
4 hrs
Unit-9: From Visual Colonialism to a Visual Trans-culture/ Cyberspace and Trans-nationality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain visual colonialism and visual trans-culture;
  • identify major aspects of representation of gender;
  • analyze cyberspace and transnationality focusing on technology and the truth.
  • Representation of Gender, Ethnicity, Color, and Class/ the Gaze, Technology and the truth
4 hrs
Unit-10: Photographic Images and Photography in Ethnography
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the photographic image and photography as a research method;
  • identify the major focus of photography in ethnography;
  • analyze different paradigms and debates regarding photographic images and ethnography.
  • Photography in early 20th-century Anthropology, Photography as Research Method, Photography in Diverse Cultural Contexts, Ethnographic Photography: Conventions and Methodologies
  • Paradigms and Debates
  • Indigenous Uses of Photography
4 hrs
Unit-11: History of Ethnographic Film and The Viewer Viewed
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history of ethnographic film;
  • identify the major focus of commodity fetishism and cultural imperialism for the ethnographic film;
  • analyze different case studies of ethnographic film.
  • What is the Ethnographic Film? Case Studies in Ethnographic Film: New trends in the ethnographic film; Reflexivity, anthropology and the film, the indigenous use of film
  • ‘Commodity Fetishism’, ‘Cultural Imperialism’, ‘Culture Industry’, ‘Manufacturing Consent’ ‘Propaganda Model’ and ‘Reception Theory’
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
 
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Banks, Marcus, and David Zeitlyn
2015 Visual Methods in Social Research. London: Sage Publication Ltd.
Crawford, Peter Ian, and David Turton, eds.
1992 Film as Ethnography. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press.
Hocking, Paul, ed.
1995 Principles of Visual Anthropology. Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter& Co.
MacDougall, David
1998 Visual Anthropology and the Ways of Knowing. In Trans-cultural Cinema. MacDougall. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
MacDougall, David
2005 The Corporal Image: Film, Ethnography and the Senses. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
Pink, Sarah
2006 The Future of Visual Anthropology: Engaging the Senses. London and New York: Routledge.
Pink, Sarah
2010 Doing Visual Ethnography. Los Angeles and London: Sage Publication Ltd.

ADDITIONAL TEXT
Appadurai, Arjun
1996 Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalizations. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Askew, Kelly, and Richard R. Wilk, eds
2002 The Anthropology of Media: A Reader. Malden: Blackwell Publishers.
Bakewell, Liza
1998 Image Acts. American Anthropologist 100(1):22-32.
Banks, Marcus, and Howard Morphy, eds.
1997 Rethinking Visual Anthropology. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Barbash, Ilisa and Lucein Taylor
1997 Cross-Cultural Filmmaking: A Handbook for Making Documentary and Ethnographic Films and Videos. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Barker, Chris
1999 Television, Globalization and Cultural Identities. Buckingham: Open University Press.
Barthes, Roland
1977 Image-Music-Text. New York: The Noonday Press.
Baudrillard, Jean
1988 Simulacra and Simulations. In Jean Baudrillard: Selected Writings. Mark Postrer, ed. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
Bhabha, H. K.
1994 The Location of Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
Burgin,Victor, ed.
1982 Thinking Photography. London: Macmillan
Collier, John Jn., and Malcolm Collier
1986 Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albuquerque: University of New Maxico Press.
Cook, Guy
1996 The Discourse of Advertising. London: Routledge.
Coote, Jermy, and Anthony Shelton, eds.
1992 Anthropology, Art and Aesthetics. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Dicks, B. Mason, with A. Coffey and P. Atkinson
2005 Qualitative Research and Hypermedia: Ethnography for the Digital Age. London: Sage Publication Ltd.
Edwards, Elizabeth, ed.
1992 Anthropology and Photography 1860 to 1920. New Haven: Yale University Press in association with The Royal Anthropological Institute, London.
Flaherty, Robert J.
1922 How I Filmed ‘Nanook of the North’. World’s Work Pp. 632-640.
Foucault, Michael
1986 Of Other Spaces. Diacritics Pp.22-27.
Gaggi, S.
1997 From Text to Hypertext. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
Ginsburg, Faye d., with Lila Abu-Lughod and Brian Larkin, eds.
2002 Media Worlds, Anthropology on New Terrain. London: University of California Press.
Gray, Gordon
2010 Cinema: A Visual anthropology. Oxford: Berg.
Griffiths, Alison
1996 Knowledge and Visuality in Turn-of-the-century Anthropology: The Early Ethnographic Cinema of Alfred Cort Haddon and Walter Baldwin Spencer. Visual Anthropology Review12(2):18-43.
Grimshaw, A., and A. Ravetz
2004 Visualizing Anthropology. Bristol: Intellect.
Heider, Karl G.
2006 Ethnographic Film. Austin: University of Texas Press.
Hodkinson, Paul
2011 Media, Society and Culture: An Introduction. New Delhi: Sage Publications Ltd.
Jay, Martin
1991 The Disenchantment of the Eye: Surrealism and the Crises of Ocularcentrism. Visual Anthropology Review 7.1:15-38.
Kawase, Itsushi
2007 Filming Itinerant Musicians in Ethiopia: Azmari and Lalibalocc: The Camera as Evidence of Communication. Nilo-Ethiopian Studies 11:29-39.
MacDougall, David
1992 ‘Photo Wallahas’: An Encounter with Photography. Visual Anthropology Review8(2):96-100.
Mead, Margaret, and Gregory Bateson
1977 On the Use of the Camera in Anthropology. Studies in the Anthropology of Visual Communication 4(2):78-80.
Mirzoeff, Nicholas, ed.
2002 The Visual Culture Reader. London: Routledge.
Morin, Edgar
2003 Chronicle of a Film. In Ciné-ethnography Pp.229-265.  Steven Feld. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Mubi Brighenti, Andrea
2010 Visibility in Social Theory and Social Research. The United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.
Nichols, Bill
2010 Introduction to Documentary. Indiana: Indiana University Press.
Pink, Sarah, with L. Kurti and A. I. Afonso, eds.
2004 Working Images. London: Routledge.
Pinney, C.
1992 The Parallel Histories of Anthropology and Photography. In Anthropology and Photography. Elizabeth Edwards, ed. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.
Rada, R.
1991 Hypertext: From Text to Expertext. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
Rollwagon, Jack, ed.
1988 Anthropological Filmmaking. Chur: Harwood Academic Publishers.
Rouch, Jean
2003 The Camera and Man. In Ciné-ethnography Pp. 29-46. Jean Rouch. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Ruby, Jay
1975 Is an Ethnographic Film a Filmic Ethnography? Studies in the Anthropology of Visual Communication2(2):104-111.
Ruby, Jay
1996 Visual Anthropology. In Encyclopedia of Cultural Anthropology. David Levinson and Melvin Ember, eds. New York: Henry Holt and Company.
Ruby, Jay
2000, Picturing Culture: Explorations of Film & Anthropology. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.
Scherer, Joanna Cohan, ed.
1990 Picturing Cultures: Historical Photographs in Anthropological Inquiry. In Special issue of Visual Anthropology 3.2D3: Harwood Academic Publishers.
Silverston, Roger
1994 Television and Everyday life. London: Routledge.
Sutton, D.
2001 Remembrance of Repasts: An Anthropology of Food and Memory. Oxford: Berg.
Terry, J., and M. Calvert, eds.
1997 Processed Lives: Gender and Technology in Everyday life. London and New York: Routledge.
Van Maanen, J.
1995 An End to Innocence: The Ethnography of Ethnography. In Representation in Ethnography. John Van Maanen, ed. London: Sage Publications Ltd.
Worth, Sol, and John Adair
1972 Through Navajo Eyes: An Exploration in Film Communication and Anthropology. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

FILMS
Bishop, John, and Harald Prins
2003Oh! What a Blow that Phantom Gave Me. 52 mins.
Curtis, Edward S.
1972 [1914] In the Land of the War Canoes: Kwakiutl Indian Life on the Northwest Coast. 47 mins.
Flaherty, Robert J.
1922Nanook of the North.69 mins.
Gardner, Robert
1978 Forest of Bliss.
Himpele, Jeffrey, and Quetzil Castañeda
1997Incidents of Travel in Chichén Itzá. 90 mins.
MacDougall, Davidand Judith MacDougall
1991Photo Wallahs. 60 mins.
Marshall, John
1957The Hunters.72 mins.
Masenko, Yola
1998 The Life and Times of Sara Baartman: The Hottentot Venus. 53 mins.
Massot, Claude
2004Nanook Revisited. 55 mins.
Rouch, Jean
1954Les Maîtres Fous (The Mad Masters). 29 mins.
Rouch, Jean, and Edgar Morin
1961Chronique d’un été (Chronicle of a Summer). 85 mins.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 506: HISTORY, MEMORY AND AMNESIA

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
The course is based on the perspectives of history from below, subaltern and feminist. It tries to add these perspectives to the changing landscape, objectives, and canvas of history. However, starting from a new inquiry, the discipline of history itself could be useful for social science. It will open the window for history and anthropology to exchange their experiences and applications.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Understand the politics beyond memory and amnesia;
• Analyze the construction of history;
• Understand the pattern of how one becomes able to memorize something and simultaneously forget the event successfully.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Conceptualizing History, Memory and Amnesia
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the background of history, memory, and amnesia;
  • identify major debates on history, memory, and amnesia;
  • analyze the concepts and debates regarding the politics beyond memory and amnesia.
  • Contemporary debates regarding these concepts
12 hrs
Class Test
Unit-2: Where is History? Are there Histories of People without Europe? From History to Genealogies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain myth and genealogies regarding the history of people;
  • identify major aspects of the histories of people without Europe;
  • analyze the contributions of social historians in anthropology.
  • Beyond a monolithic myth, genealogies as a non-progressive, multi-sited, pluralistic approach
  • Social historians and their engagement in anthropology
16 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-3: Politics of Dislocation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain various perspectives in historiography;
  • identify major issues related to subaltern studies;
  • analyze the debates on subaltern studies.
  • Various perspectives in historiography: locating subaltern in the historiography of South Asia
  • Subalternists interpreting and re-reading the elitist texts; can the subaltern speak?
  • Contemporary debates on the decline of the subaltern in subaltern studies
14 hrs
Unit-4: Politics of Memory and Amnesia- Feminist Encounter
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain feminist encounter regarding the politics of memory and amnesia;
  • identify major features of feminist methodology in exploring women’s experience;
  • analyze the feminist understanding of memory and amnesia with examples from the history of the liberation war in Bangladesh.
  • Politics of memory and amnesia
  • Identifying autobiography and personal memory as research tools
  • Feminist methodology in exploring women’s experience differently: e.g. history of the liberation war in Bangladesh
14 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Amin, Shahid
1995 Event, Metaphor, Memory. Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Amin, Shahid, and Dipesh Chakrabarty, eds.
1996 Subaltern Studies IX: Writings on South Asian History and Society. Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Sree Shakti Sangathana
1989 We were Making History: Life Stories of Women in the Telengana People’s Struggle. New Delhi: Kali for Women.
Wolf, Eric R.
1982 Europe and the People without History. Berkeley: University of California Press.
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2002 BwZnvm wbgv©‡Yi ms¯‹…wZ| cÖKvwkZ wecbœ f~wgR| †gRevn Kvgvj I AvwidvZzj wKewiqv m¤úvw`Z| XvKv: Drm cÖKvkbx|

ADDITIONAL TEXT
Arnold, David, and David Hardimann, eds.
1994 Subaltern Studies VIII: Essays in Honour of Ranaji tGuha. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, Delhi.
Asad, Talal
1987 Are there Histories of People without Europe? Review Article. Comparative Studies in Society and History 29(3):594-607.
Carr, Edward H.
1965 What is History? Middlesex: Pelican Books.
Carroll, B., ed.
1976 Liberating Women’s History. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
Chatterjee, Partha, and Pradeep Jagannathan, eds.
1998 Subaltern Studies XI: Writings on South Asian History and Culture. New Delhi: Permanent Black.
Dunaway, David, and Willa K. Bauman, eds.
1996 Oral History: An Interdisciplinary Anthology. Walnut Creek: Altamira Press.
Guha, Ranajit,ed.
1989 Subaltern Studies I-VI: Writings on South Asian History and Society. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Guha, Ranajit
1997 Dominance without Hegemony, History and Power in Colonial India.London: Harvard University Press.
Hobsbawm, Eric J.
1959 On History. London: Abacus.
Islam, Rafiul
2015, “The Oraon Ethnic Community in Bangladesh: Oral History Perspective”, The Dhaka University Studies, Vol. 70, No. 1, Dhaka: The Registrar, University of Dhaka, pp. 187-203.
Perks, Robert, and Alistair Thomson, eds.
1978 The Oral History Reader. London: Routledge.
Sarkar, Sumit
1997 Writing Social History. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Scott, Joan Wallace
1988 Gender and the Politics of History. Colombia: Colombia University Press.
Singer, Wendy
1997 Creating Histories: Oral Narratives and the Politics of History Making. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Spivak, Gayatri C.
1988 Can the Subaltern Speak? In Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture. Cary Nelson and Lawrence Grossberg, eds. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 507: GLOBAL ETHNOSCAPES: MIGRATION AND DIASPORA
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
The main purpose of the course is to equip students with thorough knowledge of the major theoretical and empirical issues in migration and diaspora studies. The course will provide a thorough grounding in critical theoretical approaches to migration, space, and identity, race and hybridity, the gendered construction of nationhood, and cultural identity concerning globalization and transnationalism. Theoretically, the course will focus on various perspectives of transnationalism and transnational activism and how these are related to processes of migration, diaspora politics, and forced migration and displacement. The course will analyze how these interact and affect collective and individual action at a global, national, and local level and what impacts these have on multicultural societies.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Understand transnationalism and its disjuncture and difference in the global cultural flows and migration;
• Analyze exclusion, governance, diaspora, transnational networks, and changing identities;
• Explain place and the politics of home and global trafficking;
• Understand forced migration, refugees and exile communities;
• Analyze the significance of migration and diaspora debates in specific contexts with case studies.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: International Migration and Trans-nationalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of international migration;
  • identify basic features of different paradigms of migration;
  • analyze critical theories on migration and trans-nationalism.
  • Definition, theories, and paradigms (pessimistic, optimistic, neo-classical-development, functionalist, structuralist, neo-Marxist, Cumulative causation, historical structuralist, deterministic, pluralist
  • The new economy of labor migration and debates
8 hrs
Unit-2: Migration History
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the history of migration;
  • identify major material aspects of migrant labor;
  • analyze the politics of disposition through an understanding of the ideologies of home and nation.
  • Slavery and indentured labor
  • Material aspects of migrant labor and livelihood
  • The politics of disposition (Said), ideologies of home and nation
6 hrs
Unit-3: Migration-development/ Underdevelopment-migration, Trans-nationalism and Multiculturalism
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the contexts of migration development and underdevelopment;
  • identify major areas of understandings regarding space, identity, and politics of difference;
  • analyze the pattern of transnationalism and multiculturalism.
  • The easy/ uneasy relationships
  • Space, identity, and politics of difference: beyond culture and border, politics of multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism, minority, religious persecution, racism, and ethnic cleansing border, politics of multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism, minority, religious persecution, racism, and ethnic cleansing
6 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Forced Migration, Displacement, and Refugee
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of forced migration;
  • identify major features of forced migration and displacement;
  • analyze different approaches to refugees with examples.
  • Human trafficking, sex tourism, and terrorism
  • Assessing and theorizing refugee, the anthropological views and approaches, UNHCR conventions
  • Tragic world of the refugees: case studies from Syria, Pakistan and Bangladesh
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Diaspora and its Multidisciplinary Issues
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of diaspora;
  • identify major features of diaspora globally;
  • analyze different theoretical perspectives regarding migration, diaspora, and human trafficking.
  • Anthropology, geography, psychology, history, and cultural studies (Edward Said, Homi Bhaba, Stuart Hall, James Clifford, Paul Giloy, ArjunAppaadurai, Theodore Adorno, Jacques Derrida, V. S. Naipal, Derek Walcott and Salman Rushdie)
  • Migration/Diaspora; Sexuality and Gender (Child and Women), Human Trafficking (the case of Rohingya)
8 hrs
Unit-6: Diaspora, ‘Place of Belongingness’, and ‘Feelings of Exclusion’
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the assimilation and acculturation processes of diaspora;
  • identify major issues related to diaspora and borderland;
  • analyze the dynamics of development considering diaspora and remittance.
  • Assimilation and acculturation, border and borderland, language, hybridity, double consciousness, memory, and nostalgia
  • Diaspora, remittance and dynamics of development
6 hrs
Unit-7: Diaspora in Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the development issues related to diaspora;
  • identify major aspects of development
  • focusing on migration and diaspora;
  • analyze the role of transforming human capital in nation-building through migration and diaspora.
  • Diaspora engagement in development in the country of residence and the country of origin
  • Direct investment, philanthropic contribution, from ‘return of talents’ to brain circulation to ‘virtual return’
  • Transforming human capital and playing role in nation-building
8 hrs
Unit-8: Displaced, Exile Communities and Climate Refugees
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain climate refugees;
  • identify major features of climate refugees;
  • analyze different perspectives related to politics, war, and climate change to understand migration, diaspora, and refugees.
  • Issues of politics, war, and climate change
6 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Appadurai, Arjun
1996 Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimension of Globalization, Mineapolis: University of Bhaba, Minnesota Press.
Bhaba, Homi K.
1994 Location of Culture. London: Routledge.
Braziel, Jana Evans, and Anita Mannur, eds.
2003 Theorizing Diaspora: A Reader. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
Cheah, Pheng, and Bruce Robbins, eds.
1998 Cosmopolitics: Thinking and Feeling Beyond the Nation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Clifford, James
1997 Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Cohen, Robin
1997 Global Diaspora: An Introduction. London: UCL Press.
Gupta, Akhil, and James Ferguson
1997 Beyond ‘Culture’: Space, Identity and Politics of Difference. In Culture, Power, Place: Exploration in Critical Anthropology. Akhil Gupta and James Ferguson, eds. Pp. 33-51. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
Gilroy, Paul
1992 The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness. Cambridge: Harvard UP
Hall, Stuart.
1993 Cultural Identity and Diaspora. In Identity: Community, Culture, Difference. Jonathan Rutherford, ed. Also In Colonial Discourse and Post-Colonial Theory: A Reader. Patrick Williams and Laura Chrisman, eds. Pp. 392-401. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf.
Hannerz, Ulf
1996 Trnsnational Connections: Culture, People, Places. London: Routledge.
Kearney, M.
1995 The Local and the Global: The Anthropology of Globalization and Transnationalism. Annual Anthropological Review 24:547-65.
Lavie, S. and T. Swedenburgeds.
1996 Displacement, Diaspora and Geographies of Identity, Durham, Duke University Press.
Lewellen, Ted. C.
2002 The Anthropology of Globalization: Cultural Anthropology Enters the 21st Century, USA: Greenwood Publishing Group.
Reeves, Peter, and Rajesh Rai
2009 The South Asian Diaspora: Transnational Networks and Changing Identities. London: Routledge.
Rushdie, Salman.
1992 Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991. London: Granta.
Said, Edward W.
2001 The World, the Text, and the Critic; After the Last Sky; Culture and Imperialism (‘the Voyage In’); Representations of the Intellectual; Reflections on Exile (1984). Reflections on Exile and Other Literary and Cultural Essays. London: Granta Books.
Spivak, Gayatri.
1997 Diasporas Old and New: Women in the Transnational World. Textual Practice 10.2 (1996): 245-269.Also In Class Issues: Pedagogy, Cultural Studies, and the Public Sphere. Amitava Kumar, ed. Pp. 87-116. New York & London: New York University Press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Cameron, Sally, and Edward Newman, eds.
2007 Trafficking in Humans: Social, Cultural, and Political Dimensions. UN: United Nations University Press.
Clifford, James
1994 Diaspora. Cultural Anthropology 9(3):302-338.
Eriksen, Thomas Hylland
2003 Globalization: Studies in Anthropology. London: Pluto Press.
French, H.
2000 Vanishing Borders: Protecting the Planet in the Age of Globalization. New York: W.W. Norton.
Haas, H.
2005 International migration, remittances and development: myths and facts. Third World Quarterly 26(8):1269-1284.
Lim, Lin Lean, ed.
1998 The Sex Sector: The Economic and Social bases of Prostitution in Southeast Asia. Geneva: International Labour Office.
Long, Lynellyn D.
1993Ban Vinai: The Refugee Camp. New York: Columbia University Press.
Malkki, Liisa H.
1995 Refugees and Exile: From “Refugee Studies” to the National Order of Things. Annual Review of Anthropology 24:495-523.
Safran, William
1991 Diaspora in Modern Societies: Myths of Homeland and Return. Diaspora 1(1):83-99.
Smith, M.P., and L.E. Guarnizo, eds.
1998 Transnationalism from Below. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.
Van Hear, Nicholas
1998 New Diaspora: The Mass Exodus, Dispersal, and Regrouping of Migrant Communities. London: UCL Press.
Vertovec, S.
2009 Transnationalism. London: Routledge.

JOURNALS
Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Studies. University of Toronto Press.
Public Culture: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Transnational Studies. Duke University Press.
Cultural Studies. Routledge.
FICTION, POETRY, AND CINEMA
Ghosh, Amitav
2008 Sea of Poppies. Toronto, ON, Canada: Penguin Group (Viking).
Naipaul, V. S.
1967 The Mimic Men. UK: Andre Deutsch.
Naipaul, V. S.
1979 Bend in the River Philips. UK: Alfred A Knopf.
Naipaul, V. S.
1987 The Enigma of Arrival. UK: Viking Press.
Phillips, Caryl
1991 Cambridge. US: Alfred A. Knopf.
Phillips, Caryl
1993 Crossing the River. UK: Bloomsbury Publishing.
Rushdie, Salman
1989 The Satanic Verses. UK: Viking Press.
Walcott, Derek
1990 Omeros. US: Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
Walcott, Derek
1986 Collected Poems 1948-84. London: Faber & Faber.
Frears, Stephen, dirs.
2002 Dirty Pretty Things. 97 min. Miramax Films. Hollywood.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 508: POPULATION ANTHROPOLOGY
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
The purpose of this course is to orient students to the uses of anthropological theories and methods in understanding population dynamics. Conventionally, demography, or population studies include fertility, mortality, and migration through the application of statistical tools. Currently, cultural anthropologists have come forward to examine the relationships between population dynamics and culture using qualitative approaches which will be covered in this course.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Examine the relationships between population dynamics and other aspects of culture;
• Understand sexual beliefs and behavior through the anthropological study of the population;
• Analyze marriage, fertility, morbidity and mortality, household structure, child care, and demographic behavior of the people.

Unit wise Learning Outcomes, Course Contents, and Number of Classes per Unit

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction to Population Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of population anthropology;
  • identify basic features of the methods of population anthropology;
  • analyze the theories on population studies.
  • Concepts
  • Theories
  • Methods
12 hrs
Unit-2: World Population Growth
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the issues related to world population growth;
  • identify major aspects of population growth;
  • analyze the rends of global population growth.
  • Issues and Variations
  • World population demography
  • Trends of world population growth
6 hrs
Unit-3: Cross-Cultural Biological Reproduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the contexts of biological reproduction;
  • identify major features of biological reproduction;
  • analyze biological reproduction with cross-cultural examples.
  • Major concepts of biological reproduction
  • Cross-cultural studies of biological reproduction
4 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Culture and Fertility
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of fertility;
  • identify major aspects of culture and fertility;
  • analyze the relationship between culture and fertility to study the world population.
  • Concepts of fertility
  • Theories of fertility
  • Relationship between culture and fertility
6 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Culture and Mortality
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of mortality;
  • identify major aspects of culture and mortality;
  • analyze the relationship between culture and mortality to study the world population.
  • Concepts of mortality
  • Theories of mortality
  • Relationship between culture and mortality
8 hrs
Unit-6: Migration
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts related to migration;
  • identify major issues related to migration and population study;
  • analyze the contexts of different types of migration to understand world population growth and control.
  • Concepts of migration
  • Population migration for world population growth and balance
  • Internal, external, and international migration
6 hrs
Unit-7: Cultural Responses to Family Planning and Methods
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of family planning;
  • identify major features of different types of family planning methods;
  • analyze contemporary debates and cross-cultural responses to family planning practices.
  • Concepts of family planning
  • Methods of family planning
  • Cultural responses to family planning processes
  • Family planning, population control, and contemporary debates
Unit-8: Population Dynamics among the Ethnic Communities
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain population dynamics;
  • identify major features of population pattern among the ethnic communities;
  • analyze different perspectives related to population, ethnic communities, and internal and external dynamics.
  • Population growth and ethnic communities
  • Population dynamics and ethnic communities
6 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Bledsoe, Caroline, and Barney Cohen, eds.
1993 Social Dynamics of Adolescent Fertility in Subsaharan Africa. Washington DC: National Academy Press.
Easterin, Richard A., ed.
1997 Population and Development. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
Fricke, Thomas E.
1994 Himalalayan Household: Tamang Demography and Domestic Process. New York: Colombia University Press.
Handwoked, W. Penn
1990 Births and Power: Social Change and the Politics of Reproduction. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
Harris, Marcvin, and Eric B. Ross
1997 Deaths, Sex and Fertility: Population, Regulation in Preindustrial and Developing Societies. New York: Colombia University press.
Kertzer, David I., and Tom Fricke, eds.
1997 Anthropological Demography: Toward a New Synthesis. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
Miller, Barbara D.
1981 The Endangered Sex: Neglect of Female Children in Rural North India. Ithaca and London: Cornell University press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
BBS
1991, Bangladesh Population Census. Dhaka: Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.
BBS
2001, Bangladesh Population Census. Dhaka: Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.
BBS
2011, Bangladesh Population Census. Dhaka: Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.
Fishah, Rose
1978 Population, Food Intake and Fertility. Science 1999:23-30.
Howell, Nancy
1999 Demography of the Dobe! Kung. New York: Academic Press.
Malhotra, Anshu
2002 Gender, Caste, and Religious Identities, Restructuring Class in Colonial Punjab. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Mamdani, Mahmood
1972 The Myth of Population Control: Family Caste and Class in and Indian Village. New York: Monthly Review press.
Miller, Barbara D., ed.
1993 Sex and Gender Hierarchies. New York: Cambridge University press.
Moni, Neg
1972 Population Anthropology: Problems and Perspectives. In Explorations in Anthropology. Morton Fried, ed. Pp. 254-274. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell.
Sehaper-Hughes, Nancy
1993 Death without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil. Berkeley: University of Carolina Press.

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of anthropology and public health;
  • identify basic features of public health;
  • analyze the pattern of global health hazards.
  • Nature and magnitude of global health hazards
  • The situation of Bangladesh- priorities to address, strategies to implement, and measurement of progress
6 hrs
Unit-2: Interdisciplinary Research in Health Problems
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different health problems;
  • identify major research traditions addressing health problems;
  • analyze bio-environmental, clinical, and social and cultural data regarding health problem research.
  • Bio-environmental data
  • Clinical data
  • Epidemiological data
  • Social and cultural data
6 hrs
Unit-3: Infectious Disease
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the pattern of infectious disease;
  • identify major features of different infectious diseases;
  • analyze the political-ecological factors responsible for infectious diseases.
  • Political-ecology of infectious disease
  • HIV/AIDS – nature and magnitude of the global pandemic, prevention programs, engagement of traditional healers
  • Tuberculosis – nature, and magnitude of the White Plague, the ‘new’ Tuberculosis, Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis
  • Malaria-resistance, resurgence and the way forward
  • Role of anthropologists in community-based mosquito intervention programs
  • Cholera-return of a primordial disease, prevention strategies
8 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Non-communicable Disease and Global Health
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the pattern of non-communicable diseases to understand global health;
  • identify major reasons behind non-communicable diseases;
  • analyze indigenous dietary patterns and lifestyles to understand global health.
  • Non-communicable diseases (cancers, circulatory disorders of heart and brain, diabetes) as one of the major reasons for mortality and their relations to unplanned urbanization, dietary changes, less physical activity, and other socio-economic factors
  • Discussions on indigenous dietary pattern and lifestyle of some communities that help reduce the risk of such diseases
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: The Ecology and Economy of Nutrition
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of nutrition;
  • identify major aspects of ecological and economic factors of nutrition;
  • analyze the relationship between nutritional status and subsistence patterns of different communities to understand famine and hunger of the present world.
  • The relation between nutritional status and subsistence pattern (hunting, gathering, and farming)
  • Famine and hunger in the present world
  • Nutrition throughout the life cycle (cases from different cultures) and the social cost of malnutrition
8 hrs
Unit-6: Modernization, Culture and Health Policy
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain modern global health policy;
  • identify basic features of global health policy focusing on family planning;
  • analyze the contexts, challenges, and criticisms of different health policies with examples.
  • Family planning programs- success, challenges, and criticisms
  • Children’s health- breastfeeding versus bottle-feeding
  • Female circumcision- women’s choice or structural violence?
Unit-7: Global Technologies, Medicines and Health
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of global technologies for health;
  • identify major features of different reproductive technologies;
  • analyze contemporary debates on modern technologies with clinical trials and ethics.
  • Assisted reproductive technologies and medical tourism
  • Global pharmaceutical industries and the issue of affordable treatment, clinical trials, and ethics
6 hrs
Unit-8: Community Health
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the context of community health;
  • identify major features of community health care practices;
  • analyze different perspectives and debates related to community health.
  • Debates on primary healthcare, community participation and community health worker, traditional healer integration, anthropological challenges, and critiques
  • Rural and urban healthcare organizations- role and functions for managing public health
6 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.

ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Briggs, Charles L., and Clara Mantini-Briggs
2003Stories in the Time of Cholera. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Doyal, Leslie
1979The Political Economy of Health. London: Pluto Press.
Farmer, Paul
1999Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plague. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Hahn, Robert A., and Kate W. Harris, eds.
1999 Anthropology in Public Health. New York: Oxford University Press.
Inhorn, Marcia, and Peter J. Brown, eds.
1997The Anthropology of Infectious Disease: International Health Perspectives. London: Routledge.
Kamat, Vinay
2013 Silent Violence: Global health, Malaria, and Child Survival in Tanzania. Tucson: The University of Arizona Press.

ADDITIONAL TEXT
Arnold, David
1993Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in Nineteenth Century India. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Bala, Poonam
1991 Imperialism and Medicine in Bengal: A Socio-historical Perspective. New Delhi: Sage Publications.
Begum, Farhana
2015Women’s Reproductive Illness: Capital and Health Seeking. Dhaka: Dhaka University Prakashana Sangstha.
Farmer, Paul
1992AIDS and Accusation. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Farmer, Paul
2005Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Geannine, Coreil, and G. Dennis Mull, eds.
1990 Anthropology and Primary Health Care. Boulder: Westview Press.
Inhorn, Marcia, and Frank van Balen, eds.
2002Infertility Around the Globe. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Inhorn, Marcia
2003 Local Babies Global Science. New York: Routledge.
Kahn, Susan Martha
2000 Reproducing Jews. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press.
Nichter, Mark
1989Anthropology and International Health: South Asian Case Studies. Arizona: Springer-Science Business Media.