Coures

4.2 MSS 2ND SEMESTER
COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 551: POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES: HYBRIDITY AND OTHERNESS
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
The course aims at exploring, otherness, and hybridity, both concerned with identity, the two theoretical concepts that have been central to postcolonial theory in anthropology. ‘Otherness’ is a western philosophical concept that postcolonial theory has primarily sought to critique and repudiate, while hybridity is generally considered an ‘invention’ of postcolonial thought, a radical substitute for hegemonic ideas of cultural identity like racial purity and nationality.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Introducing basic interconnections of the concepts of hybridity and otherness;
• Examining theoretical and literary materials on postcolonial studies;
• Analyze conceptual frameworks, meanings, and uses of the terms in postcolonial studies.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the contexts of self and other in western philosophy;
  • identify major aspects of ‘other’, alter ego, and enigma to and of the self;
  • analyze the meaning of ‘other’ mean to these endeavors.
  • Self and other in Western philosophy – Hegel
  • Existentialism and ethics – Sartre, de Beauvoir, Levinas, Derrida
  • Post-psychoanalysis – Lacan
  • Genealogy – Foucault
  • Connections to postcolonial theory
8 hrs
Unit-2:  Questions of Representation
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the conceptual relationship between otherness and representation;
  • identify who is the ‘other’, historically and symbolically;
  • analyze how do self and other translate inevitably into ‘us’ and ‘them’?
  • Said, Hartog, Todorov
6 hrs
Class Test
Unit-3: Anthropology and the Other
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the context of other in anthropology;
  • identify how the figure of the other, hitherto silent and effaced, has made claims to speak;
  • analyze the realm of politics in radical ways.
  • Anthropology and the other: Fabian, Taussig, Ghosh, Ramanujam
  • Woman, Native, Other: Bhabha, Alloula, Trinh
  • Race and Otherness: Fanon, Achebe, Jan Mohammed
8 hrs
Unit-4: Multiculturalism and Minority
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts related to multiculturalism;
  • identify basic features of multiculturalism and minority;
  • analyze different perspectives on how minority emerges within multiculturalism.
  • Taylor, Mohanty
6 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Interrogating Alterity
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain alterity from an anthropological perspective;
  • identify major aspects of alterity;
  • analyze how the other know/speak itself?
  • Spivak, Suleri
6 hrs
Unit-6: Human and Non-human
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the human and non-human interactions;
  • identify major aspects of otherness through human and non-human interactions;
  • analyze different theoretical perspectives regarding human and non-human interactions towards otherness.
  • Sinha, Hartman, Williams
6 hrs
Unit-7: Introduction to Hybridity
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts related to hybridity;
  • identify basic features of hybridity;
  • analyze the emergence of the concept hybridity in postcolonial studies.
  • Hybridity in theory
4 hrs
Unit-8: Hybridity and its Conceptual Relevance
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the relevance of hybridity in postcolonial studies;
  • identify different aspects of studying hybridity;
  • analyze the relation of hybridity to the earlier use of the concept in literature, linguistics, translation theory, psychology, and later developments in sociology, anthropology, and postcolonial theory.
  • Hybridity in Biology: race- Young
  • Hybridity in Language: Bakhtin
  • Hybridity in Translation: Benjamin
  • Hybridity in Culture: Hall, Bhabha, Rushdie
  • Hybridity in Anthropology: Hannerz, Canclini
  • Hybridity in Latin America/ Caribbean: Freyre, Brathwaite, Glissant
12 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Achebe, Chinua
1978 An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. Massachusetts Review rpt in The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism.
Alloula, Malek
1986 The Colonial Harem. Myrna Godzich and Wlad Godzich, trans. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Beauvoir, Simone de
1949 The Second Sex. Introduction: ‘Woman as Other’.
Bhabha, Homi
1994 The Other Question: Stereotype, discrimination and the discourse of colonialism. In The Location of Culture. London: Routledge,
Bhabha, Homi
1994 Articulating the Archaic: Cultural difference and colonial nonsense. In The Location of Culture. London: Routledge.
Derrida, Jacques
1978 Violence and Metaphysics: An Essay on the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas. In Writing and Difference. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
Fabian, Johannes
1983 Time and the Other: How Anthropology Makes Its Object. Columbia: Columbia University Press.
Fabian, Johannes
2006 The other revisited: Critical afterthoughts. Anthropological Theory6(2):139-152.
Fanon, Frantz
1967 The Fact of Blackness. In Black Skin White Masks. Charles Lam Markmann, trans. New York: Grove.
Fanon, Frantz
1967 The Negro and Recognition. In Black Skin White Masks. Charles Lam Markmann, trans. New York: Grove.
Foucault, Michel
1965 Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason. Richard Howard, trans. New York: Vintage Books.
Ghosh, Amitav
1986The Imam and the Indian.Granta20:135-146.
Hartman, Saidiya
1997 Seduction and the Ruses of Power, of Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
Hartog, Francois
1988 The Mirror of Herodotus: The Representation of the Other in the Writing of History. J. Lloyd, trans. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Hegel, G. W. F.
1977 Phenomenology of Spirit. A.V. Miller, trans. Berkeley: Oxford University Press.
Jan Mohamed, Abdul
1985 The Economy of the Manichean Allegory: The Function of Racial Difference in Colonialist Literature. Critical Inquiry 12:59–87.
Lacan, Jacques
1977 The Mirror Stage as Formative of the Function of the I as Revealed in Psychoanalytic Experience. In Écrits: A Selection. Alan Sheridan, trans. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.
Levinas, E.
1991 Wholly Otherwise. In Re-reading Levinas. R. Bernasconi, and S. Critchley, eds. London: Athlone Press.
Levinas, E.
1969 Totality and Infinity. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press.
Levinas, E.
1969 Time and the Other. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press.
Miller, J. Hillis
2001 Others. Princeton. N.J.: Princeton University Press.
Mohanty, Satya P.
1995 Colonial legacies, multicultural futures: relativism, objectivity and the challenge of otherness. Publication of the Modern Languages Association110(1):108–18.
Mohanty, Satya
1989 Us and Them: On the Philosophical Bases of Political Criticism. Yale Journal of Criticism 2:1-31.
Ricoeur, P.
1992 Oneself as another. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Rosello, M.
2001 Postcolonial Hospitality. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Said, Edward W.
1979 Orientalism. New York: Random House, Inc.
Said, Edward W.
1989 Representing the Colonized: Anthropology’s Interlocutors. Critical Inquiry 15.
Sinha, Indra
2007 Animal’s People. London: Simon & Schuster.
Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty
1989 Who Claims Alterity? In Remaking History. B. Kruger, and P. Mariani, eds. Seattle: Bay Press.
Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty
1999 From A Critique of Postcolonial Reason: Toward a History of the Vanishing Present. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Suleri, Sara
1992 Woman Skin Deep: Feminism and the Postcolonial Condition. Critical Inquiry 18:756-769.
Suleri, Sara
1992 The Rhetoric of English India. In Rhetoric of English India. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Taussig, Michael
1993 Mimesis and Alterity. New York: Routledge.
Taylor, Charles
1994 The Politics of Recognition. In Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition. Amy Gutmann, ed. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
Todorov, Tzvetan
1984 The Conquest of America. Richard Howard, trans. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.
Trinh, T. Minh-ha.
1989 Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.
Williams, Patricia
1991 On Being the Object of Property. In The Alchemy of Race and Rights. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Ahmad, Dohra, ed.
2007 Rotten English: A Literary Anthology. New York: WW. Norton.
Bakhtin, M. M.
1981 The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays. Caryl Emerson, and Michael Holquist, trans. Austin: University of Texas Press.
Benjamin, Walter
1996 The Task of the Translator. In Selected Works. Marcus Bullock, and Michael W. Jennings, eds. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Bhabha, Homi K.
1994The Location of Culture. London: Routledge.
Bhabha, Homi K.
1990 The Third Space: Interview with Homi K. Bhabha’. Identity: Community, Culture, Difference. In Jonathan Rutherford, ed. Pp. 207-221. London: Lawrence &Wishart.
Brah, A., and Annie E. Coombes, eds.
2000 Hybridity and its Discontents: Politics, Science, Culture. London: Routledge.
Brathwaite, Edward
1971The Development of Creole Society in Jamaica 1770-1820. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Canclini, Néstor Garcia
1995 Hybrid Cultures. Strategies for Entering and Leaving Modernity. Christopher L. Chiappari, and Silvia L. López, trans. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Chambers, Iain, and Lidia Curti, eds.
1996 The Post-colonial Question: Common Skies, Divided Horizons. London: Routledge.
Freyre, Gilberto
1946 The Masters and the Slaves: A Study in the Development of Brazilian Civilization. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.
Glissant, Édouard
1997 [1990] Poetics of Relation. Betsy Wing, trans. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Hall, Stuart
1987 Minimal Selves. In The Real Me: Post-Modernism and the Question of Identity. London: ICA Documents 6:44-6.
Hall, Stuart
1988 New Ethnicities. In Black Film British Cinema. London: ICA Documents 7:27-31.
Hall, Stuart
1990 Cultural Identity and Diaspora. In Identity: Community, Culture, Difference. Jonathan Rutherford, ed. Pp.222-37. London: Lawrence and Wishart.
Hannerz, Ulf
1996 Transnational Connections: Culture, People, Places. London: Routledge.
Walcott, Derek
1990 Omeros. In Debating Cultural Hybridity: Multicultural Identities and the Politics of Anti-racism. Pnina Faber Werbner, and Tariq Modood, eds. London: Zed Books.
Young, Robert J.C.
1995 Colonial Desire: Hybridity in Culture, Theory and Race. London: Routledge.
Young, Robert J.C.
2003 Raï and Islamic Social Space. In Postcolonialism: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 552: ANTHROPOLOGY OF MIND AND EMOTIONS

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
The course aims at unfolding some theoretical and methodological assumptions to examine the implicit ideology of the emotions which have conventionally been associated with femininity and in opposition to the reason (or rationality), while reason accorded the higher value. This course draws on the assumption that studying the theorization and expression of the emotions is itself a study in the politics and values of a culture. Emotions vary from culture to culture and at the same time also have histories within cultures. Therefore, the course intends to explore emotions as a source of knowledge.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Introducing basic understanding to the concept of emotions from multi/ interdisciplinary perspectives
• Familiarising students with the methodology of a phenomenology of the emotions
• Discuss and explain specific emotions (or affects and sensations): structures of effect in modernity and postmodernity, with a focus on nostalgia and panic.
UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNI

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Theoretical and Cross-Disciplinary Readings
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain anthropological understandings of mind and emotion;
  • identify major anthropological and philosophical perspectives on emotions;
  • analyze methodology for a phenomenology of emotions.
  • Anthropologists Catherine Lutz and Emily Martin
  • Philosophers Alison Jaggar and Elizabeth Spellman
  • Historian Peter Stearns
  • Sociologist Arlie Hochschild
  • Social and cultural theorists Raymond Williams and Fredric Jameson
12 hrs
Unit-2: Structures of Feeling
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of feeling;
  • identify major aspects of feeling from anthropological perspectives;
  • analyze psychoanalytic theory and emotions.
  • Freud
  • Melanie Klein
  • Christopher Bollas
10 hrs
Class Test
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain concepts of trauma and testimony;
  • identify basic features of trauma and testimony in education;
  • analyze different theoretical perspectives related to trauma and testimony.
  • Shoshana Felman
  • Megan Boler
  • Michalinos Zembylas
10 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: Specific Emotions and Cultural Objects
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concept of shame with a focus on raciality;
  • identify basic features of shame and humiliation;
  • analyze the specific emotions and cultural objects with an understanding of shame, humiliation, and embarrassment
  • Shame, humiliation, and embarrassment
8 hrs
Unit-5: Theorizing Shame and Suffering
At the end of this unit students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of shame and suffering;
  • identify major aspects of suffering;
  • analyze the interdisciplinary understanding of shame and suffering.
  • Grief as a diasporic emotion
8 hrs
Unit-6: Sentimentality and Compassion
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of sentimentality and compassion in literary studies;
  • identify significant aspects of sentimentality and compassion;
  • analyze structures of effect in modernity and postmodernity.
  • Nostalgia
  • Trauma and grief
  • Panic
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Bouson, J. Brooks
2009 Embodied Shame- Uncovering Female Shame in Contemporary Women’s Writings. New York: State University of New York Press.
Goodstein, Elizabeth S.
2005 Experience without Qualities: Boredom and Modernity. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Jameson, Fredric
1991 Postmodernism or, the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism? Durham: Duke University Press.
Lear, Jonathan
2006 Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Lutz, Catherine A.
1988 Unnatural Emotions: Everyday Sentiments on a Micronesian Atoll and Their Challenge to Western Theory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Martin, Emily
2000 The Rationality of Mania. In Doing Science and Culture. Roddy Reid and Sharon Traweek, eds. New York: Routledge.
Pfau, Thomas
2005 Romantic Moods: Paranoia, Trauma, and Melancholy, 1790-1840.Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
Rae, Patricia, ed.
2006 Modernism and Mourning. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press.
Taxidou, Olga
2005 Tragedy, Modernity and Mourning. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Thurman, Robert
2005 Anger. New York: Oxford University Press.
Weinstein, Cindy
2004 Family, Kinship, and Sympathy in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Bollas, Christopher
1987 Moods and the Conservative Process. In The Shadow of the Object: Psychoanalysis of the Unthought Known. Pp. 99-116. New York: Columbia University Press.
Boler, Megan
1999 A Pedagogy of Discomfort: Witnessing and the Politics of Anger and Fear. In Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. Pp. 175-203. New York: Routledge.
Boym, Svetlana
2001 From Cured Soldiers to Incurable Romantics: Nostalgia and Progress. In The Future of Nostalgia. Pp. 3-18. New York: Basic Books.
Cvetkovich, Ann
2003 Legacies of Trauma, Legacies of Activism. In An Archive of Feelings. Pp. 205-38. Durham: Duke University Press.
Eng, David L., and Shinhee Han
2003 A Dialogue on Racial Melancholia. In Loss: The Politics of Mourning. David L. Eng and David Kazanjian, eds. Pp. 343-71. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Fisher, Berenice
1984 Guilt and Shame in the Women’s Movement: The Radical Ideal of Action and Its Meaning for Feminist Intellectuals. Feminist Studies 10.2:185-212.
Fosso, Kurt
2004 Buried Communities: Wordsworth and the Bonds of Mourning. Albany: SUNY Press.
Freud, Sigmund
1917 Mourning and Melancholia.SE 14:239-58.
Hartman, Saidya
2002 The Time of Slavery. South Atlantic Quarterly 101.4:757-77.
Hendler, Glenn
2001 Public Sentiments: Structures of Feeling in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.
Hochschild, Arlie
1983 The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Howard, June
1999 What is sentimentality? American Literary History 11.1:63-81.
Jaggar, Alison M.
1989 Love and Knowledge: Emotions in Feminist Epistemology. In Gender/ Body/ Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing. Alison M. Jaggar and Susan R. Bordo, eds. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.
Kahn, Victoria, ed.
2006 Politics and the Passions, 1500-1850.Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Kalliney, Peter J.
2006 Cities of Affluence and Anger: A Literary Geography of Modern Englishness. Virginia: University of Virginia Press.
Klein, Melanie
1986 A Study of Envy and Gratitude (1956). In The Selected Melanie Klein. Juliet Mitchell, ed. Pp. 211-29. New York: The Free Press.
Lane, Christopher
2004 Hatred and Civility: The Antisocial Life in Victorian England. New York: Columbia University Press.
Miller, William Ian
1993 Historicizing Humiliation. In Humiliation. Pp. 175-201.Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
Morrison, Toni
2000 The Bluest Eye. New York: Penguin.
Orr, Jackie
2006 Panic Xanax. In Panic Diaries: A Genealogy of Panic Disorder. Pp. 213-33. Durham: Duke University Press.
Pinch, Adela
1996 Introduction: Emotional Extravagance and the Epistemology of Feeling. InStrange Fits of Passion: Epistemologies of Emotion, Hume to Austen. Pp. 1-16. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
Spelman, Elizabeth V.
1997 The Heady Political Life of Compassion. In Fruits of Sorrow: Framing Our Attention to Suffering. Pp. 59-89. Boston: Beacon Press.
Stearns, Peter N.
1994 Impersonal, but Friendly: Causes of the New Emotional Style. In American Cool: Constructing a Twentieth Century America. Pp. 193-228. New York: New York University Press.
Woodward, Kathleen
1999 Statistical Panic. Differences 11.2:177-203.
Zembylas, Michalinos
2006 Witnessing in the Classroom: The Ethics and Politics of Affect. Educational Theory 56.3:305-24.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 553: ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE BODY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
The purpose of this course is to introduce the major debates and theoretical approaches to the study of the body from an anthropological perspective. This course considers the body as a site of diversified meanings and looks at how socio-cultural, historical, and political processes shape the idea of the body in different cultural settings. It examines the mechanisms that regulate and control the body and the processes by which bodies resist.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Introducing major debates and theoretical approaches to the study of body;
• Critically examining how socio-cultural, historical and political processes shape the idea of the body;
• Evaluate mechanisms that regulate and control the body and vice versa.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Introduction to Anthropology of the Body
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the development of body-mind duality into philosophical thought;
  • identify major aspects of the concept of embodied self;
  • analyze and critically discuss why bodies became a significate site of study.
  • Why do anthropologists focus the body as a site of study?
  • Cartesian legacy- mind / body dualism in Western thought
  • The idea of embodied self
8 hrs
Unit-2:  Social Bodies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain social bodies from anthropological perspectives;
  • identify the basic notion of social body;
  • analyze how bodies become a marker, identity, and representation of social categories.
  • The issue of identity and representation
  • Bodies and social categories represent each other
8 hrs
Class Test
Unit-3: Bodies and Metaphors
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the body as a metaphor;
  • identify major symbolic meanings of the body;
  • analyze and critically discuss how meanings associated with body, purity, and pollution can create disparity.
  • Symbolic meanings of the body, perceptions of the male body and female body that reflect broader gender disparity
  • Cultural interpretations of the female body in the light of purity and pollution
  • The body’s intimate relation to its social and physical context, the issue of ‘third sex’
8 hrs
Unit-4: Practicing and Experiencing Body
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the body through practicing and experiencing;
  • identify basic features of the body from the perspectives of practice and experience;
  • analyze, relate, and use the concepts of habitus, embodiment, and phenomenology with the body.
  • Establishing body identity through practice
  • The idea of habitus, embodiment, and phenomenology
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Colonized, Disciplined and Resistant Bodies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain concepts related to colonized, disciplined, and resistant bodies;
  • identify basic features of different bodies;
  • analyze biopower and evaluate its aims and process of creating disciplined bodies and embodied resistance.
  • The idea of biopower and disciplined body, surveillance and politics of the state in constructing a fit body
  • Embodied resistance
12 hrs
Unit-6: Commodified, Hybrid and Cyborg Bodies
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of commodified and hybrid bodies;
  • identify major features of cyborg bodies;
  • analyze and critically discuss the issues of the commodification of bodies/ body parts.
  • The debates on surgery and beautification
  • Media and the representation of the body
  • Technology, birth and redefining kinship
  • Bio-politics and alienation of body parts
12 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Arnold, David
1993Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in Nineteenth Century India. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Bourdieu, Pierre
1990The Logic of Practice. London: Polity.
Csordas, Thomas
1990 Embodiment as a paradigm for anthropology. Ethos 18(1):5-47.
Csordas, Thomas, eds.
1994Embodiment and Experience. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Inhorn, Marcia
2003 Local Babies Global Science. New York: Routledge.
Kahn, Susan Martha
2000Reproducing Jews. London: Duke University Press.
Martin, Emily
1987The Woman in the Body. Boston: Beacon Press.
Martinn, Emily
1994Flexible Bodies. Boston: Beacon Press.
Scheper-Hughes, Nancy, and Margaret Lock
1987The mindful body. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 1(1):6-41.
Lock, Margaret, and Judith Farquhar, eds.
2007 Beyond the Body Proper. Durham: Duke University Press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Asad, Talal
1997Remarks on the anthropology of body. In Religion and the Body. S. Coakley, eds. Pp. 42-52. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Boddy, Janice
1982Womb as oasis: the symbolic context of pharaonic circumcision in rural Northern Sudan. American Ethnologist 9(4):682-698.
Douglas, Mary
1966 Purity and Danger. London: Routledge.
Foucault, Michel
1978 The History of Sexuality. New York: Random House.
Foucault, Michel
1979 Discipline and Punish. New York: Random House.
Mauss, Marcel
1973Techniques of the body. Economy and Society 2(1):70-88

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 554: DISASTER ANTHROPOLOGY
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
The main purpose of the course is to offer students an overview of a variety of natural and man-made disasters. It will also examine how society is prepared for, response to, and recovers from specific events of the disaster from an anthropological perspective. The course will allow students access to scientific storytelling, social research, and theories on disasters. Students will gather an increased appreciation of the complexities associated with planning for and responding to natural and man-made disasters. Students will also learn how disasters emerge from the confluence of hazard, risk, and the social construction of vulnerability.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Familiarize current and historical focus of disaster and disaster research;
• Discuss myths, lores, and legends related to disasters;
• Explain and evaluate basic concepts in disaster anthropology, cultural dimensions of disasters, and indigenous disaster management in Bangladesh and abroad.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Anthropological Contribution to Disaster Research
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of disaster in anthropology;
  • identify basic features of disaster;
  • analyze the trends of disaster research by anthropologists historically.
  • Understanding how cultural anthropologists research risk and disasters
  • Findings produced by research on risk and disaster
8 hrs
Unit-2:  Disaster in Myths and Legends
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the myths and legends of disaster;
  • identify major aspects of myths and legends of disasters;
  • analyze and evaluate how disaster events are perceived by humans.
  • Myths, realities, and cultural representations of disasters
  • What can we learn about culture and society from the study of past disasters?
8 hrs
Unit-3: Key Concepts in Disaster Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain key concepts in disaster anthropology;
  • identify basic features of the key concepts in disaster anthropology;
  • analyze and use the concepts of disaster anthropology.
  • Risk
  • Man-made and natural disaster
  • Vulnerability
  • Preparedness
  • Indigenous coping mechanism
  • Security
  • Resilience
8 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4: Disasters, Environment, and Culture
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the connection between environment and culture;
  • identify the major roles of humans in creating disasters;
  • analyze and comprehend the role of an anthropologist in disaster research and disaster management.
  • Role of humans in creating disasters or the conditions for disasters?
  • How information on past disasters can be used to better prepare for and respond to emergent disasters?
  • Environment-culture nexus
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Varieties of Cultural Response to Disaster
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how communities confront disasters;
  • identify major aspects of cultural response to disasters;
  • analyze the role of the anthropologist in community reconstruction and restoring livelihoods.
  • How communities perceive, prepare, and cope with disaster
  • Pre, during and post-disaster responses
8 hrs
Unit-6: Natural Resource Management and Indigenous Disaster Management
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain natural resource management;
  • identify major aspects of indigenous disaster management;
  • analyze and implement anthropological knowledge for risk management and emergency response.
  • Selected cases
8 hrs
Unit-7: Natural Disasters in Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the trends of natural disasters in Bangladesh;
  • identify major features of the natural disasters in Bangladesh;
  • analyze the anthropological research for policy design and programs that seek to reduce risk, prevent disasters, and respond to disasters in Bangladesh.
  • Types of disaster that generally occur in Bangladesh
  • Coping mechanism and preparedness at the local and state level
  • Anthropological perspectives on confronting systems of coping mechanisms
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Hoffman, Susana M., and Anthony Oliver-Smith, eds.
2002 Catastrophe and Culture: The Anthropology of Disaster. Santa Fe, NM: School of American Research Press.
Smith, Keith
1996 Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster. London and New York: Routledge.
Milton, Kay
1996 Environmentalism and Cultural Theory: Exploring the role of anthropology in environmental discourse. London and New York: Routledge.
Piccardi, L., and W.B. Masse, eds.
2007 Myth and Geology. London: The Geographical Society.
Oliver-Smith, Anthony, and Susanna M. Hoffman, eds.
1999 The Angry Earth: Disaster in Anthropological Perspective. New York and London: Routledge.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Hassan, Shahed
2015 On Nature and Knowledge. Montreal, Canada: Media Ariel and Publications.
Jhonson, Martha, ed.
1992 Lore: Capturing Traditional Environmental Knowledge. Hay River, NWT, CA: Dene Cultural Institute.
World Commission on Environment and Development
1987 Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 555: COSMIC ANTHROPOLOGY
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
The purpose of this course is to give theoretical understanding to the student to explore the numerous dimensions of the fundamental concepts in cosmic anthropology such as living universe, nature, sound, space, time, mind, etc. Taking this course in the postgraduate anthropology program students will be able to help facilitate the birthing and renewal of life-giving socio-economic and political structures so that everyone may have access to live and live it to their fullest potential and help to understand the dynamics of the earth changes from flat at a shallow perspective to spherical at a larger perspective. It will help students to view the present epoch in the history of our planet and permanent deleterious changes in the entire earth from a cosmic perspective. In the modern age, the importance of the study of cosmic anthropology has arisen in connection with issues such as global warming and species extinction for sustainable development of human culture, society, and the entire universe.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Understand the core ideas of cosmic anthropology;
• Understand the togetherness of macro-cosmos (planets, suns, moons, galaxies, etc.), human beings (sensory organs, brain, mind, consciousness, internal organs, etc.), and human societies (families, communities, nations, institutions, NGOs, civil societies, trade unions, farmers, fisherfolks, youth, women, urban-rural);
• Analyze mental constructs (beliefs, culture, ideologies, religion, etc.) and micro-cosmos (quarks, neutrons, protons, electrons, molecules, DNA, etc.);
• Evaluate how order and harmony of the entire living and non-living things exist;
• Explain man’s deviations from the inherent law and principle of the cosmos that disharmony and disorder the universe.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Theories related to Cosmic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning and definition of cosmic anthropology;
  • identify major issues elaborated by different theories;
  • analyze social practices or even social change relating to indigenous cosmologies.
  • Edmund leach and theories of religion
  • Hocart on the world of order
  • Durkheim and Mauss on Order of the social life
  • Geertz on indigenous cosmological order
  • Levi-Strauss on the order of the orders
  • Mary Douglas on anomalies and the cosmological order
  • Barth on the production of cosmologies
Unit-2:  Basic Concepts in Cosmic Anthropology and its’ Definition
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the basic concepts in cosmic anthropology;
  • identify major aspects of the forms of the living universe;
  • analyze the perspectives of nature, space, time, and mind in cosmic anthropology.
  • The forms of the living universe
  • The order of nature
  • The nature of sound
  • The arena of space
  • The apperception of time
  • The ontology of mind
4 hrs
Class Test
Unit-3: Principles of Cosmic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain major principles of cosmic anthropology;
  • identify basic features of the principles;
  • analyze the universe as an ordered whole and the general laws which govern it across cultures.
  • Anthropic cosmic principle
  • Cosmic blueprint
6 hrs
Unit-4: Laws in Cosmic Anthropology: Physical, Manmade and Moral Laws
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different laws in cosmic anthropology;
  • identify significant features of the laws;
  • analyze the metaphysical and physical understanding of the world cross-culturally.
  • Issues of cooperation or “working together”: a most important cosmic law and principle as an integral part of the cosmic evolutionary process
6 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-5: Culture in Cosmic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the cosmological dimension of social life;
  • identify basic features of cosmological dimension;
  • analyze and explain how culture formed concerning the cosmic understanding in different settings.
  • Cosmological dimensions of social life in different ethnographic settings
4 hrs
Unit-6: Big Bang versus Steady-State Cosmology: Cosmic Perspective
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain cosmic perspective on big bang cosmology;
  • identify the nexus between the big bang and steady-state cosmology;
  • analyze and critically evaluate different arguments regarding the development of the current state of the world and societies.
  • How the horizons of human worlds are imagined and engaged – illuminate understandings of the contemporary world
8 hrs
Unit-7: Culture in the Cosmosphere
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain astronomy, cosmology, and biosphere in cosmic anthropology;
  • identify basic features of astronomy, cosmology, and biosphere;
  • analyze cosmology and cultural practices.
  • Astronomy, cosmology, and biosphere
4 hrs
Unit-8: Issues of Development in Cosmic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the issues of development in cosmic anthropology;
  • identify significant features of development through cosmic anthropology;
  • analyze the recent trends and practices that might help ensure sustainable development through perspective gained by the practice of cosmic anthropology.
  • The shift from ‘high modernity’ (in which orientations toward cosmos are variously constrained and circumscribed) to the flattening effects of the ‘fluid’ modernity of neoliberalism and concerns with cosmic orders and dynamics in people’s lives
8 hrs
Unit-9: Applied Cosmic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of applied cosmic anthropology;
  • identify the characteristics of applied cosmic anthropology;
  • analyze the perspectives of cosmic anthropology in diverse social settings.
  • The ethnographic study of ‘cosmologies’ relevant to contemporary anthropology, and
  • How cosmological perspectives illuminate understandings of the contemporary world?
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Greenstein, George
1988 The Symbiotic Universe: Life and Mind in the Cosmos. New York: William Morrow.
Mason, Nigel, and Peter Hughes
2001 Introduction to Environmental Physics: Planet Earth, Life and Climate. New York: Taylor and Francis.
Saraswati, Baidyanath
2004 Culture and Cosmos: The Cosmic Anthropological Principle. New Delhi: Aryan Books International.
Saraswati, Baidyanath, ed.
2001 The Nature of Man and Culture. New Delhi: IGNA & Aryan Books International.
Saraswati, Baidyanath, and Yolott Gonzalez Torres, eds.
1999 Cosmology of the Sacred World: The Vision of the Cosmos of Different Peoples of the World. New Delhi: Decent Books.

ADDITIONAL TEXT
Baskin, Yvonne
2005 Underground: How Creatures of Mud and Dirt Shape Our World. Washington. Island Press.
Dahl, Stephan
2000 Communications and Culture Transformation: Cultural Diversity, Globalization and Cultural Convergence. ECE: University of Chicago Press.
Davis, Paul, and John Gibbin
1992 The Matter Myth: Beyond Chaos and Complexity. London: Penguin Books.
Gallant, Roy A.
2003 The Wonders of Biodiversity. New York: Benchmark Books.
Hardi, P., and T. Zdan
1997 Assessing Sustainable Development: Principles in Practice. Winnipeg: IISD.
Ling, Samuel Ngun
2005 Globalization and Asian Theology: A Burmese Christian Perspective. Hong Kong SAR: CTC Bulletin.
Schauberger, Viktor
1998 Nature as Teacher: New Principles in the Working of Nature. UK: Gateway Books.
Stackhouse, Max L., and Peter J. Paris
2000 God and Globalization. Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.
Tal, Alon, ed.
2006 Speaking of Earth: Environmental Speeches that Moved the World. New York: Rutgers University Press.
Wallace, Alfred R.
1904 Man’s place in the universe: a study of the results of scientific research in relation to the unity or plurality of worlds. London: George Bell & Sons.
Williams, Robert Charles
1983 Scientific Creationism: An Exegesis of a Religious Doctrine. American Anthropologist 85.

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: The Background of Symbolic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain from materialist towards idealist theories in anthropology;
  • identify major aspects of the creation of and conveying meanings through symbols;
  • analyze why the emphasis on meaning in the definitions of culture has become prominent.
  • The theoretical shift from function to meaning in anthropological enterprises during the 1960s –1970s
8 hrs
Unit-2:  Major Contributors to Symbolic Anthropology
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different perspectives on symbolic anthropology;
  • identify basic features of the perspectives;

analyze and critically evaluate theories of symbolism and their applications to society.

  • Raymond Firth, Meyer Fortes, Clifford Geertz, Victor Turner, Mary Douglas, Ernest Gellner, Erving Goffman, Ward Goodenough, Sherry B. Ortner, Monica Wilson, Gregory Bateson, Gilbert Lewis, Barbara Babcock, Renato Rosaldo, Barbara Meyerhoff, Terence S. Turner, Milton Singer, Maurice Bloch, Marilyn Strathern, James Fernandez
14 hrs
Class Test
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain culture and language as a communication system;
  • identify the basic features of the communicative system;

analyze culture as a collection of arbitrary symbols.

  • Culture and communication- culture as a collection of arbitrary symbols
  • The rules of the language enabling participants in communication
  • The structuring principles of the human mind and the thought process; binary opposition; men and metaphor- metaphors as universal building blocks of human thought
  • Language determining the perception of the world; the role of language in understanding and giving meaning to the world; marking of difference within the language to the production of meaning of the cultural codes; the structure of communication- three levels of communicative operation i.e. communication of person, goods and messages
10 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: Language and the System of Meaning
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the science of meaning;
  • identify the use of language in real-world contexts;

analyze the knowledge about signs, semiotics, and symbolism through various symbolic methods and theories.

  • The meaning of word and sentence- elementary issues in semantics and pragmatics
  • The science of meaning and the use of language in real-world contexts
  • Basic concepts in semantics- utterance and sentence, contradiction, entailment, paraphrase, sense, and reference, denotation and connotation
  • Semiotics as communication science- introduction, definition, and importance of semiotics
  • Signs and symbols- notion, classification, Saussurian model and Peircean model; some important notions of semiotics- code, text, object, signified and signification, connotation and denotation, syntagmatic and paradigmatic, language and parole; social and cultural semiotics
12 hrs
Unit-5: Culture as a Symbolic System
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the diverse social structure and cultural contexts from a symbolic perspective;
  • identify major features of symbols and meaning;

analyze symbolic anthropological theories to explain social and cultural dynamism.

  • Symbols and meaning- introduction to theories of symbolism, methods of interpretation in anthropology including the debates over rationality, structuralism, metaphor theory, and pragmatism
  • Interpretation and symbolic system- emphasis on the analysis of culture as an interpretive science; social drama, metaphor and public symbolism- properties of dominant public symbols; analogy and metaphor; unification and polarization; polyvalence or polysemic meaning; methods of decoding symbols (Victor Turner)
12 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Bourdieu, Pierre
1990 The Logic of Practice. London: Polity Press.
Chomsky, Noam
2003On Language. New York: Penguin Books.
Claire, Kramesch
2000Language and Culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Eco, Umberto
1997A Theory of Semiotics. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
Gellner, Ernest
1992 Postmodernism, Reason and Religion. London: Routledge.
Geertz, Clifford
1973 The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic Books.
Levi- Strauss, Claude
1962 Structural Anthropology. New York: Basic Books.
Pease, Allan
2002Body Language. New Delhi: Sudha Publications Ltd.
Scearle, J.R.
1997Expression and Meaning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Turner, Victor
1967 The Forest of Symbols: Aspects of Ndembu ritual. New York: Cornell University Press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Ardener, E. ed.
1971 Social Anthropology and Language. London: Tailstock.
Boon, J. A.
1982 Other Tribes: Symbolic Anthropology in the Comparative Study of Cultures, Histories, Religion and Texts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Chandler, Danial
2002Semiotics: The Basics. London: Routledge.
Culler, Jonathan
2001The Pursuit of Signs. London: Routledge.
Derrida, Jacques
1976 Of Grammatology. G.C. Spivak, trans. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
Douglas, Mary
1966 Purity and Danger: An Analysis of the Concepts of Pollution and Taboo. London: Rutledge.
Foceville, Chasless
1996Pictorial Metaphor in Advertising. London: Routledge.
Gellner, Ernest
1973 Cause and Meaning in the Social Science. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Hodge, Robert, and Funther Kress
1988Social Semiotics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hurford, James R., and Brendan Heasley
1999Semantics: A Course Book. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kyle, J.G., and B. Woll
1995 Sign Language: The Study of Deaf People and their Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Laver, John
2000 Principles of Phonetics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Layton, Robert
1997 An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Leach, Edmund R.
1961 Rethinking Anthropology. London: Athlone.
Leach. Edmund R.
1970 Levi Strauss. Suffolk: Fontana Collins.
Levi- Strauss, Claude
1973 The Savage Mind. USA: The University of Chicago Press.
Lucas, Ceil, ed.
2001 The Sociolinguistics of Sign Languages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lumsden, Michael
1988Existential Sentence: Their Structure and Meaning. London: Routledge.
Merret, Floyd
1997 Signs: An Introduction to Semiotics. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
Miller, George
1951Language and Communication. London: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
Napoli, Donna Jo
1996 Linguistics: An Introduction. London: Oxford University Press.
Needham, R.
1972 Belief, Language, and Experience. Oxford: Blackwell,
Obeyesekere, Gananath
1981 Medusa’s Hair: An Essay on Personal Symbols and Religious Experiences. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Peeceei, Jean Stilwell
1999 Pragmatics. London: Routledge.
Saussure, Ferdinand de.
1960 Course in General Linguistics. London: Peter Queen Limited.
Salzmann, Zdenek
1993Language, Culture and Society. Oxford: West View Press.
Sperber, D.
1975 Rethinking Symbolism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Todorov, T.
1982 Theories of the Symbol.C. Porter, trans. Oxford: Blackwell.
Thakur, D.
1999Semantics. Patna: Baharati Bhawan.
Yule, George
1985The Study of Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 557: BUSINESS, CULTURE AND SOCIETY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
The purpose of this course is to apply the theories and methods of cultural anthropology in studying business in the local and global contexts. The objective is to give students a clear understanding of how businesses operate in different societies and cultures. Case studies of how businesses interact with the local societies, cultures, and environments will be taken from Bangladesh, India, China, Japan, the USA, and the UK.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• To impart basic understanding of business anthropology, organizational theory and culture, corporate culture and social responsibility;
• To enhance skill to analyze the relationships between business and society, business and culture, and business and environment;
• Cross-cultural orientation in conflict mediation and resolution at the local level businesses, work environment, and working relations in the farm;
• Evaluate the impact of global agendas of corporate social and environmental responsibility, social business, and sustainable business strategies.
UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Issues and Concepts in the Anthropology of Business
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning and definition of the anthropology of business;
  • identify major aspects of the relation of business with peoples, cultures, and politics – locally and globally;
  • analyze the sociocultural diversities in business and management.
  • Local, global, and South Asian perspectives
8 hrs
Unit-2:  Changing Corporate Cultures
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of corporate culture;
  • identify basic features of corporate economic, social and environmental responsibilities;
  • analyze the changing economic systems and politics behind the discourse of corporate responsibilities.
  • Corporate economic, social, and environmental responsibilities
  • Impact of business on local communities and environments
10 hrs
Class Test
Unit-3: Changing Global Governance of Work, Labor Markets and Trade
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain global governance, local market, and trade through neoliberal capitalism;
  • identify major aspects of the market;
  • analyze the relevancy of culture to understand differences in managerial strategies, corporate values, and decision making.
  • Globalization, the emergence neoliberal of capitalism, and consequent changes in the world business model
  • The market with Anthropological Perspective; cross-cultural issues in global marketing; and social marketing
  • The cross-cultural issues in international trade
10 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-4: State, Civil Society, and Business
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of state and civil society in anthropology;
  • identify basic features of different types of trade;
  • analyze the conflict between free versus fair business models in the globalized world.
  • Fairtrade and free trade
10 hrs
Unit-5: Business, Development and the Politics of Distribution
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the connection between business and development;
  • identify major aspects of the politics of distribution;
  • analyzed the growth of business and development along with distribution politics and import-export policies.
  • The production base of the world economy
  • Imbalance in export and import
  • Policies regulating international trade
8hrs
Unit-6: The Anthropologist and the Study of Business: an uneasy relationship?
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the historical relationship between the anthropologist and the study of business;
  • identify major tasks played by anthropologists concerning business, society, and culture;
  • analyze anthropologists’ role as specialists for the business corporation as well as for the communities.
  • The history of the relationship between anthropology and business in society and culture
  • Positions which anthropologists have taken and may still take concerning business
10 hrs
Semester Final Examination

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Byars, Lioyd L., and Leslie W. Rue
2000 Human Resource Management. New York: Irwin/Mcgraw-Hill.
Ferraro, Gary P.
1994 The Cultural Dimension of International Business. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.
Gillan, M., and B. Pokrant, eds.
2009 Trade, Labour and Transformation of Community in Asia. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
Jordon, Ann T.
2003 Business Anthropology. Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press Inc.
KPMG
2002 Ethical Business and Sustainable Communities. Australia: KPMG Sustainability Advisory Services.
Mian, Alimullah
2006 Dynamics of Corporate Social Responsibility: Bangladesh Context. Dhaka: IUBAT.
Sherry, John F. Jr.
1986-87 Marketing and Consumer Behaviour: Windows of Opportunity for Anthropology. Steward Anthropology Society 16(1 and 2).
Valdez, Palma Buttler
2005 Peoples Capability Maturity Model and Anthropology. USA: Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Aguilera, Francisco E.
1996 Is Anthropology Good for the Company? American Anthropologist 98(4):735-742.
Baba, Marietta L.
2006 Anthropology and Business. In Encyclopaedia of Anthropology. H. Jones Brix, ed. Pp. 83-117. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Dipak R. Pant, and Ferdinand Alberti
1997 Anthropology and Business: Reflection on the Business Applications of Cultural Anthropology. Liuc Papers 42. Serie Eionomia e Impresa 11.
Earley, P. Christopher, and Miriam Erez
1997 The Transplanted Executive: Why You Need to Understand How Workers in Other Countries See the World Differently. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
Feathersone, Michael, ed.
1990 Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. London: Sage Publications.
Fisher,Cynthia D., with Lyle F. Schoenfeldt and James R. Shaw
2006 Human Resource Management. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Harris, Philip R., and Robert T. Moran
1996 Managing Cultural Differences. Houston: Gulf Publishing Company.
Holzberg, Carol, and Maureen Giovannini
1981 Anthropology and Industry Reappraisal and New Directions. Annual Review of Anthropology 10:317-360.
Jordon, Ann
1994 Practicing Anthropology in Corporate America: Consulting on Organizational Culture. Arlington, VA: National Association for the Practice of Anthropology.
Kotler, Philip,and Kavin Lane Keller
2009 Marketing Management. USA: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Laabs, Jennifer J.
1992 Corporate Anthropologists. Personnel Journal 7(1):81-87.
Malefyt, Timothy, and Brian Moeran
2003 Advertising Cultures New York: Berg.
Monappa,Arun,and Mahrukh Engineer
1999 Liberalization and human Resource Management: Challanges for The Corporations of Tomorrow. New Delhi: Response Books.
Ned Seelye, H., and Alan Seelye-James
1995 Culture Clash: Managing in a Multicultural World. Lincolnwood, IL: NTC Publishing Group.
Richardson Jr., F.L.W.
1955 Anthropology and Human Relations in Business and Industry. Year Book of Anthropology, Pp.397-419. Chicaho: The University of Chicago Press/Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research.
Serrie, Hendrick, ed.
1986 Anthropology and International Business. Williamsburg, VA: Department of Anthropology at William and Mary.
Trompenaars, Alfons, ed.
1998 Riding the Waves of Culture: Understanding Cultural Diversity on Global Business. New York: McGraw-Hill.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 558: ANTHROPOLOGY OF PUBLIC POLICY

CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)

INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
This course attempts to broaden the scope of anthropological inquiry by shifting emphasis from the daily practices of local actors “on the ground” to the daily practices of policymakers, government bureaucrats, and the staff of international financial agencies such as the IMF and the World Bank who are explicitly and implicitly engaged in the negotiation and mediation of policy at the national and international levels. At a time when anthropologists are increasingly turning their attention to social and cultural phenomena of global reach and magnitude, the policy offers a lens through which to view the articulation of knowledge and power, upon which contemporary regimes of governance are based. This course will pursue questions including: What is the state, anthropologically speaking? How do specific policies come into being, and what makes them effective (or ineffective) instruments of governance? What is the relationship between policy forms and contemporary discourses of neoliberalism and globalization? How can ethnographic projects capture the critical dimensions of policymaking? What types of methodological challenges does the anthropology of policy pose?

COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Describe anthropology’s contributions to public policy worldwide;
• Understand an impromptu genealogy for the anthropology of policy;
• Explain anthropologists’ frameworks of governmentality and ritual to illuminate the dynamics of governance;
• Analyze anthropological perspectives to construct alternative frameworks for unpacking policymaking and its multiple entanglements with the global geopolitical order;
• Learn about how policy-oriented anthropologists gather, analyze, and present their findings;
• Understand and critique anthropological approaches to public policy problems.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Why an Anthropology of Policy?
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the emergence of the anthropology of public policy;
  • identify major issues addressed by the anthropology of policy;
  • analyze the development of anthropology: from colonialism to development.
  • Introduction: policy and anthropology
4 hrs
Unit-2:  What is the State, anthropologically speaking?
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain state from an anthropological perspective;
  • identify major characteristics of the state;
  • analyze the state from cross-cultural perspectives.
  • The cross-cultural idea of the state
4 hrs
Unit-3: Neoliberalism, Governmentality, and International Political Economy
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the emergence of neoliberalism;
  • identify basic features of governmentality and political economy;
  • analyze the making and unmaking of the third world vis a vis in the first world.
  • The emergence of neoliberalism: mentalities, rationalities, and techniques used in governmentality and political economy
4 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4:  Enumerating Reality: Regimes and Strategies of Governance
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of constructing reality;
  • identify major aspects of enumerating reality;
  • analyze the conceptual basis for an analysis of conditions, institutions, and actual processes of strategic governance.
  • Enumeration and statistics in the decision-making process and constructing reality
8 hrs
Unit-5: “Rite Makes Might”: Ritual, Policy, and Power
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of political rites;
  • identify major features of political rites;
  • analyze the importance of symbols and rites as crucial to politics and policy.
  • Political rites in different places and historical periods
8 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: From Object to Process: Policy as a Field of Action and Connection
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain policy as a field of action;
  • identify major areas of policy implementation;
  • analyze how policy guides different programs in different sectors.
  • Examples of policy and its implementation in different contexts
4 hrs
Unit-7: Anthropologists in Unconventional Places: Sites of Policy
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain anthropologists’ engagement in the sites of policy;
  • identify major roles played by anthropologists in policy-making;
  • analyze anthropologists’ contributions in policy formulating bodies.
  • Examples of anthropologists working in policy formulating bodies
8 hrs
Unit-8: Methodological Considerations in the Anthropology of Policymaking
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the methodological considerations of the anthropology of policy;
  • identify major issues covered by these methods;
  • analyze the core theoretical and methodological challenges faced by anthropologists in their potential contributions to the field of public policy.
  • Anthropological approach for an understanding of policy processes
  • How actors mediate those processes
  • Rethinking the field
  • Social Network analysis
  • The extended case method
  • Analyze “state” versus “private”, “macro” versus “micro”, and “top-down” versus “bottom-up” approaches
  • Rethinking ethics and professional codes
8 hrs
Unit-9: Case Studies: Policies in Bangladesh
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain major policies in Bangladesh;
  • identify the importance of the policies in the context of Bangladesh;
  • analyze and critically evaluate public policies concerning local and global aid agencies.
  • PRSP (Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers)
  • NSAPR (National Strategy for Accelerated Poverty Reduction)
  • Western Aid to Bangladesh
4 hrs
Unit-10: Contextualizing Policy
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning and definition of the global political economy;
  • identify major characteristics of global political economy;
  • analyze how the state relates to local populations and how state policies and government processes are experienced and interpreted by people at the local level.
  • Anthropological perspectives on global political economy
4 hrs
Semester Final Examination
 

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Gupta, Akhil, and James Ferguson
1997 Anthropological Locations: Boundaries and Grounds of a Field Science. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Greenhalgh, Susan
2007 Just One Child: Science and Policy in Deng’s China. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Nugent, David, and Joan Vincent
2004 A Companion to the Anthropology of Politics. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Ong, Aihwa, and Stephen Collier, eds.
2005 Global Assemblages: Technology, Politics, and Ethics as Anthropological Problems. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
Shore, Cris, and Susan Wright
1997 The Anthropology of Policy: Critical Perspectives on Governance and Power. London: Routledge.
Wedel, Janine
2001 Collision and Collusion: The Strange Case of Western Aid to Eastern Europe. New York: Palgrave.
Westbrook, David
2008 Navigators of the Contemporary: Why Ethnography Matters. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Briggs, Charles
2007 Anthropology, Interviewing, and Communicability in Contemporary Society. Current Anthropology 48(4):551-580.
Brown, Wendy
2003 Neoliberalism and the End of Liberal Democracy. Theory and Event 7:1.
Chalfin, Barbara
2006 Global Customs Regimes and the Traffic in Sovereignty. Current Anthropology 47(2):243-276.
Conti, Joseph A., and Moira E. O’Neil
2007 Studying Power: Qualitative Methods and the Global Elite. Qualitative Research 7(1):63-82.
Dean, Mitchell
1999 Governmentality: Power and Rule in Modern Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Feldman, Gregory
2005 Culture, State, and Security in Europe: The Case of Citizenship and Integration Policy in Estonia. American Ethnologist 32(4):676-694.
Ferguson, James, and Akhil Gupta
2002 Spatializing States: Toward an Ethnography of Neoliberal Governmentality. American Ethnologist 29(4):981-1002.
Ferguson, James
1994 The Anti-politics Machine: “Development,” Depoliticization, and Bureaucratic Power in LeSotho. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Foucault, Michel
1991 Governmentality. In The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality. Graham Burchell, ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Gal, Susan
1991 Bartók’s Funeral: Representations of Europe in Hungarian Political Rhetoric. American Ethnologist 18(3):440-458.
Gledhill, John
2004 Neoliberalism. In A Companion to the Anthropology of Politics. David Nugent and Joan Vincent, ed. Pp. 332-349.
Gluckman, Max
2002 ‘The Bridge’ Analysis of a Social Situation in Modern Zululand. In The Anthropology of Politics: A Reader in Ethnography, Theory, and Critique. Joan Vincent, ed. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers.
Gluckman, Max
2004 [1963] Order and Rebellion in Tribal Africa. London: Routledge.
Greenhalgh, Susan
2008. Just One Child: Science and Policy in Deng’s China. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Gupta, Akhil. 1995. “Blurred Boundaries: The Discourse of Corruption, the Culture of Politics, and the Imagined State.” American Ethnologist. 22(2): 375-402.
Harper, Richard
2000 The Social Organization of the IMF’s Mission Work: An Examination of International Auditing. In Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics and the Academy. Marilyn Strathern, ed. New York: Routledge.
Ho, Karen
2005 Situating Global Capitalisms: A View from Wall Street Investment Banks. Cultural Anthropology 20(1):68-96.
Holmes, Douglas R., and George E. Marcus
2005 Cultures of Expertise and the Management of Globalization: Toward the Re-Functioning of Ethnography. In Global Assemblages: Technology, Politics, and Ethics as Anthropological Problems. Aihwa Ong and Stephen Collier, eds. Pp.235-252. Malden, MA: Blackwell. 235-252.
Kertzer, David
1988 Ritual, Politics, and Power. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Larner, Wendy
2000 Neoliberalism: Policy, Ideology, Governmentality. Studies in Political Economy 63 (Autumn):5-25.
Li, Tania Murray
2005 Beyond ‘the State’ and Failed Schemes. American Anthropologist 107(3):383-394.
MacLeod, James R.
1999 The Sociodrama of Presidential Politics: Rhetoric, Ritual and Power in the Era of Teledemocracy. American Anthropologist 101(2):359-373.
Marshall, Catherine
1984 Elites, Bureaucrats, Ostriches, and Pussycats: Managing Research in Policy Settings. Anthropology and Education Quarterly 15(3):235-251.
Mosse, David
2006 Anti-Social Anthropology? Objectivity, Objection, and the Ethnography of Public Policy and Professional Communities. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 12:935-956.
Nader, Laura
2012 Up the Anthropologist: Perspectives from Studying Up. In Reinventing Anthropology. Dell Hymes, ed. Pp.284-311. New York: Vintage.
Ong, Aihwa
2006 Neoliberalism as Exception: Mutations in Citizenship and Sovereignty. Chapel Hill: Duke University Press.
Peck, Jamie, and Adam Tickell
2002 Neoliberalizing Space. In Spaces of Neoliberalism: Urban Restructuring in North America and Western Europe. Neil Brenner and Nik Theodore, eds. Pp.33-57. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
Powell, Michael, and Tara Schwegler
2008 Unruly Experts: Methods and Forms of Collaboration in the Anthropology of Policy. Anthropology in Action. (in press)
Riles, Annelise
2004 Real Time: Unwinding Technocratic and Anthropological Knowledge. American Ethnologist 31(3):392-405.
Rose, Nikolas, and Peter Miller
1992 Political Power Beyond the State: Problematics of Government. British Journal of Sociology43(2):173-205.
Schwartz, Barry
2008 Collective Memory and Abortive Commemoration: Presidents’ Day and the American Holiday Calendar. Social Research 75(1):75-110.
Schwegler, Tara
2008 Take it from the Top (Down)? Rethinking Neoliberal Economic Knowledge and Political Hierarchy in Mexico. American Ethnologist 107(3):383-394.
Schwegler, Tara
2008 Trading Up: Reflections on Power, Collaboration, and Ethnography in the Anthropology of Policy. Anthropology in Action. (in press)
Scott, James C.
1998 Seeing like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Shore, Cris, and Susan Wright
1997 Introduction. In The Anthropology of Policy: Critical Perspectives on Governance and Power. Pp. 3-42. London: Routledge.
Tsing, Anna
2000 The Global Situation. Cultural Anthropology 15(3):327-360.
Urla, Jacqueline
1993 Cultural Politics in an Age of Statistics: Numbers, Nations, and the Making of Basque Identity. American Ethnologist 20(4):818-843.
Velthuis, Otto
2006 Inside a World of Spin: Four Days at the World Trade Organization. Ethnography 7(1):125-150.
Wedel, Janine
1998 Collision and Collusion: The Strange Case of Western Aid to Eastern Europe. New York: St. Martin’s Press.
Wedel, Janine, with Cris Shore, Gregory Feldman and Stacy Lathrop
2005 Toward an Anthropology of Public Policy. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 600:30-51.
Westbrook, David
2008 Navigators of the Contemporary: Why Ethnography Matters. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Woolard, Kathryn
1989 Sentences in the Language Prison: The Rhetorical Structuring of An American Language Policy Debate. American Ethnologist 16(2):268-278.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 559: CULTURAL HERITAGE STUDIES
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION OF THE COURSE
The objective of this course is to introduce students to a range of theoretical and practical issues of cultural heritage and the major challenges of the management of cultural properties/ heritage resources. The course discusses the relations of heritage studies with anthropology, archaeology, history, natural and cultural resource management, tourism, and other allied disciplines. The course provides an opportunity to explore, analyze, and evaluate the state of the art and emerging trends in the description and digital collection of heritage in libraries, archives, and museums. It examines the principles and practices to enhance people’s access to cultural heritage materials, make easy digital content and articulation of digital technologies. Case studies of heritage from both developed and developing world will be selected for special focus.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Understand current issues and methods in cultural heritage studies;
• Explain the relevance and contributions of archaeology, cultural, linguistic, and physical anthropology for cultural heritage studies;
• Analyze the documentation, collection, and presentation of cultural heritage materials through the articulation of digital technologies.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CLASSES PER UNIT

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: Notion of Heritage
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the notion of heritage;
  • identify major characteristics of heritage;
  • analyze the concept of heritage and use the concepts to identify different heritages from local and global perspectives.
  • Critical perspectives/ global and local perspective
  • Epistemology and Ontology of the Study of Heritage
4 hrs
Unit-2:  Anthropology, Cultural Heritage and Folklore
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the anthropological understanding of cultural heritage;
  • identify the connection between anthropology, heritage, and folklore;
  • analyze anthropological practices and its relationship with heritage studies.
  • Ethnography, ethno-history, and ethnomusicology
4 hrs
Unit-3: History, Archaeology, and Heritage
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the connection of heritage studies with history and archaeology;
  • identify different heritage study processes through history and archaeology;
  • analyze societies as reflected in heritages from cross-cultural practices.
  • Reflections in society, politics, and culture of Asia/ South Asia
  • Archaeology and Heritage: inscriptions, relics, and iconography
8 hrs
Class Test
Unit-4:  Heritage, Memory, and Politics of Identity
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the heritage and politics of identity;
  • identify cultural diversity and multiculturalism along the line of heritage;
  • analyze heritage as contested in terms of religion, nationalism, and ethnicity.
  • Heritage and Cultural Diversity: nationalism vs. multiculturalism
  • Contested Heritage: religion, nationalism, and ethnicity
  • Uses of Heritage and Conflicts: conceptualizing cultural heritage as commons’ (tangible and intangible)
8 hrs
Unit-5: Justice, Law, and Rights to Heritage
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain how heritage is related to justice and law;
  • identify major legal issues related to heritage;
  • analyze the role of the judicial system for heritage rights.
  • Heritage change people and heritage change rights
4 hrs
Mid-term Examination
Unit-6: Heritage Site, Tourism, and Museums
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of heritage as being commodified through the tourism industry;
  • identify major issues related to the heritage site and museums;
  • analyze and evaluate the politics of the representation of the museum.
  • The tourism industry, branding heritage, commodification/ commoditization of heritage
  • Site interpretation, communication and management, understanding objects, artifacts, cults, exhibition, collection and curatorship, and politics of museum
4 hrs
Unit-7: Threats of Heritage
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the nature of threats to heritage;
  • identify major emerging threats to heritage in the contemporary world;
  • analyze the connection of political, religious, and environmental threats to heritage and their consequences.
  • Political, religious (iconoclasm) and environmental threats, war, climate change, ethnic conflicts
4 hrs
Unit-8: Indigenous Knowledge and Participatory Heritage Management
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain different types of techniques to manage heritage;
  • identify different processes and issues related to the documentation of heritage;
  • analyze anthropological understanding to incorporate indigenous knowledge in heritage management.
  • Documentation, preservation, and management of Heritage: issues, processes, methods, materials, and practices
  • Public presentation of heritage: advocacy and interpretation, the role of media and education
8 hrs
Unit-9: Cultural Heritage, Globalization and Development
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the processes of globalization in dealing with cultural heritage;
  • identify major aspects of complex relationships of heritage to the field of development;
  • analyze and critically examine the intimate relationships and tensions between conceptual analyses of cultural heritage and the variety of global applied operational contexts.
  • The applied context of heritage and the practical, operational implementation of cultural heritage projects and programs
  • The complex relationships of heritage to the field of development and its associated agendas such as poverty reduction, advocacy, human/ cultural rights, citizenship, aid, humanitarianism, environmentalism, post-conflict reconstruction, and wellbeing alongside experiences of globalization and change
4 hrs
Unit-10: Doing Visual Ethnography and Writing Ethnography in Heritage
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the meaning of visual ethnography;
  • identify basic features of visual methods;

analyze visual ethnography of heritages through using ethnographic photography and visual methods.

  • Thinking about visual research
  • Photography, video, cultures, and individuals
  • Planning and practicing ‘visual methods’ considering ethical issues
  • Photography and video in ethnographic research
  • Classifying and interpreting photographic and video materials
  • Ethnographic photography and printed text
  • Video and ethnographic hypermedia representation
8 hrs
Semester Final Examination
 

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Workshop, ICT integration, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Tutorial class participation, Group presentation, Class test, Term paper, Fieldwork report, Home assignment, Mid-term examination, Oral test (viva-voce), Semester final examination.
REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Adams, Kathleen M.
2005 Public Interest Anthropology in Heritage Sites: Writing Culture and Righting Wrongs. International Journal of Heritage Studies 11(5):433–439.
Addison, Alonzo
2008 The Vanishing Virtual: Safeguarding Heritage’s Endangered Digital Record. In New Heritage: New Media and Cultural Heritage. Yehuda Kalay and Janice Affleck, eds. New York: Routledge.
Ahmed, A.F. Salahuddin
2007 History and Heritage: Reflections on Society, Politics and Culture of South Asia. Dhaka: University Press Limited.
Appadurai, Arjun
1996 Modernity at Large. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Atwood, Roger
2004 Stealing History: Tomb Raiders, Smugglers, and the Looting of the Ancient World. New York: St. Martin’s Press.
Bender, B. Stonehenge
1998 Making Space. Oxford: Berg.
Benerjea, J.N.
1985 The Development of Hindu Iconography. New Delhi: Munshirar Manoharlal.
Bhuiyan, M. Mukammal, ed.
2015 Studies in South Asian Heritage. Dhaka: Bangla Academy.
Boas, F.
1940 Race, Language and Culture. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Brosius, Christiane, and Karin M. Polit, eds.
2011 Ritual, Heritage, and Identity: The Politics of Culture and Performance in a Globalized World. New Delhi: Routledge.
Burns, W.
1971 The Curator as Canary. Curator 3:213–20.
Cameron, Fiona
2008 The Politics of Heritage Authorship: The Case of Digital Heritage Collections. In New Heritage: New Media and Cultural Heritage. Yehuda Kaylay, with Thomas Kvan and Janice Affleck, eds. London: Routledge.
Cameron, Fiona, and Sarah Kenderdine
2007 Theorizing Digital Cultural Heritage: A Critical Discourse. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Chambers, Robert
1983 Rural Development: Putting the Last First. Harlow: Longman.
Clifford, James, and George Marcus
1986 Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography. Berkeley: University of California Press.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Han, Samsuzzaman, ed.
1992 [1987] Folklore of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Bangla Academy.
Haque, Enamul
1992 Bengal Sculptures: Hindu Iconography up to c. 1250 Ad. Dhaka: Bangladesh National Museum.
Haque, Enamul
2007 The Art Heritage of Bangladesh. Dhaka: International Centre for Study of Bengal Art.
Haque, Enamul
2010 Art of Weaving in Ancient Bengal. The Journal of Bengal Art 15:243-252.
Hudson, Bradford
2013 Brand Heritage and Heritage Tourism. Boston Hospitality Review.
Jigyasu, Rohit
2005 Cultural Heritage Risk Management: Issues and Challenges. In Proceedings of Meetings on Cultural Heritage Risk Management. World Conference on Disaster Reduction. Rits-DMUCH, Kyoto: 25-34 and144-154.
Lipp, Thorolf
2009 Picturing Intangible Heritage: Challenge for Visual Anthropology. Vision of an Intangible Heritage Media Institute. Germany: Bayreuth University.
Logan, William Stewart, ed.
2002 The Disappearing “Asian” city: protecting Asia’s urban heritage in a globalizing world. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
MacLean, Margaret G. H. ed.
1991 Cultural Heritage in Asia and the Pacific: Conservation and Policy. Proceedings of a Symposium held in Honolulu, Hawaii, September 8-13, 1991. Organized by the US Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites for the US. Information Agency with the cooperation of the Getty Conservation Institute.
Malpas, Jeff
2008 Cultural Heritage in the Age of New Media. In New Heritage: New Media and Cultural Heritage. Yehuda Kaylay, with Thomas Kvan and Janice Affleck, eds. London: Routledge.
Marcus, George, and James Clifford
1986 Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Science. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Matero, Frank G.
2015 Heritage, Conservation, and Archaeology: An Introduction. USA: Archaeological Institute of America.
Nason, J., and R. Wright
1994 Sharing Heritage: Native American Exhibits. Museum News 73(3): 43, 57–58, 60.
Natsuko, Akagawa, and Tiamsoon Sirisrisak
2008 Cultural Landscapes in Asia and the Pacific: Implications of the World Heritage Convention. International Journal of Heritage Studies 14(2):176–191.
Rowlands, M.
2002 Heritage and Cultural Property. In The Material Culture Reader. V. Buchli, ed. Oxford and New York: Berg.
Sanoff, Henry, ed.
2000 Participation Purposes. In Community Participation Methods in Design and Planning. Pp.1-36. New York: Wiley.
Siddiqui, Asraf
1977 Our Folklore Our Heritage. Dhaka: Bangla Academy.
Silverman, Helaine, ed.
2011 Contested Cultural Heritage: Religion, Nationalism, Erasure and Exclusion in a Global World. New York: Springer-Verlag.
UNESCO
2003 Declaration concerning the Intentional Destruction of Cultural Heritage. Paris: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.
UNESCO
2012 Managing Natural World Heritage: World Heritage Resource Manual. Paris: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.
UNESCO
2015 What is Intangible Cultural Heritage? Bangkok: UNESCO.
Winter, Tim
2007 Rethinking tourism in Asia. Annals of Tourism Research 34(1):27-44.
Winter, Tim
2010 Heritage Tourism: The Dawn of a New Era. In Cultural Heritage and Globalization. S. Labadi and C. Long, eds. London: Rout ledge.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: ANTH 560: MASTERS THESIS
CREDIT HOURS: 4 (FOUR)
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
The course is designed to engage students in the field taking experiences gathered from the first, second third, and the fourth year of fieldwork. This course will provide an approach to common concepts and methodologies in anthropology relating to ethnographic fieldwork. At the end of the fieldwork, students will have to write a Master’s thesis. This is a 4 credit course equivalent to 100 marks. and the examination of the Master’s thesis has two parts: an examination of the written thesis (80 marks) and viva-voce (20 marks).
COURSE OBJECTIVES
• Obtain practical orientation to the procedures of field research;
• Understand the procedures followed to conduct fieldwork;
• Gain the ability to relate their theoretical and methodological understandings with the field;
• Write a complete thesis and appear in a viva-voce examination to test and examine the research work and thesis.

UNIT WISE LEARNING OUTCOMES, COURSE CONTENTS, AND NUMBER OF CONTACT HOUR

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour
Unit-1: General Rules and Regulations
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain the concepts of field and fieldwork in anthropology;
  • identify various aspects of fieldwork in anthropology;
  • analyze and critically discuss the current debates of fieldwork.
  • Preparing a research proposal
  • Selection of students and supervisors
  • Presentation of research proposal in a defense class for review and comments
  • The structure of the research proposal should be aligned with the following guidelines (at least 5000 words of length):
    1. Title of the Research
    2. Introduction
    3. Background and Context of the Research
    4. Theoretical/ Conceptual/ Analytical Framework
    5. Statement of the Problem
    6. Research Objectives
    7. Rationale of the Research
    8. Methodology of the Research
    9. Thematic Divisions of the Research Report
    10. References
  • Writing and defense of the proposal and selection of the supervisors will be completed during MSS 1st semester
  • Conducting fieldwork and submitting research monograph before MSS 2nd semester final examination.
4 hrs
Unit-2: Fieldwork Issues
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain anthropological knowledge for ethnographic fieldwork of different issues;
  • identify different problems faced by people in society;
  • analyze the learning from the field.
  • Livelihood in rural and urban societies and migration
  • Community, consumption, and economy
  • Basic human rights
  • Ecology, environment and sustainable development
  • People of different cultures and ethnic origins
  • Exploration of livelihood
  • Understanding social institutions and the community
  • Kinship, gender, and social issues
  • Climate change, disaster, and development
  • Anthropological study of every aspect of human being, society, culture, economy, and politics
  • Subjectivity, reflexivity, and fieldwork relationship
  • Ethical challenges and ways of addressing these challenges
  • Issues related to medical anthropology
8 hrs
Unit-3: Conducting Fieldwork
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain fieldwork planning in connection with fieldwork issues;
  • identify salient features of the community studied in the field;

analyze and learn to utilize theoretical and methodological understandings to organize fieldwork.

  • Fieldwork planning, preparation, and selection of topic
  • Going to the field
  • Conducting fieldwork through using different anthropological research methods
  • Data collection, checking, coding, decoding, and finalization of data
  • Learning to grasp the untold stories from the field to cover fieldwork issues
  • Return from the field
28 hrs
Unit-4: Presentation of Field Data and Report Writing
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain data from the field and fieldwork experiences;
  • identify the strengths and weaknesses of the fieldwork;

analyze and critically discuss the field situation based on data obtained from the field.

  • The process of data generation
  • Tabulation and summarization
  • Data analysis
  • Presentation of the findings
  • Thesis writing following guidelines
12 hrs
Unit-5: Oral Test (Viva-voce)
At the end of this unit, students will be able to-

  • explain and communicate effectively on the topics covered by the fieldwork;
  • identify major findings from the fieldwork;

analyze and apply reflective analysis to theoretical and applied contexts.

  • Oral defense on the findings from the field
2 hrs

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Fieldwork report, Oral test (viva-voce).

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Bernard, Harvey Russell
2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.
Fetterman, D. M.
2009 Ethnography: Step-by-step (Vol. 17). Sage Publications.
ADDITIONAL TEXT
Bryman, Alan, ed.
2001 Ethnography (4 Volumes). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.
Gusterson, Hugh. ed.
2008 Ethnographic Research. In A Pluralist Guide to Qualitative Methods in International Relations. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 115-142.
Clifford, James
1983 On Ethnographic Authority. Representations 1, pp. 118-146.
Bourgois, Philippe
1990 Confronting Anthropological Ethics: Ethnographic Lessons from Central America. Journal of Peace Research 27, pp 43-54.
Warren, Kay B. ed.
2001 Telling Truths. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 198-218.
Montejo, Victor D. ed.
2001 Truth, Human Rights, and Representation. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 372-91.

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Lecture, Interactive discussion, Question-answer (quiz), Observation, Debate, Presentation etc.
ASSESSMENT
Class attendance, Fieldwork report, Oral test (viva-voce).

REFERENCES
REQUIRED TEXT
Bernard, Harvey Russell
2011 Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Lanham: Altamira Press.
Fetterman, D. M.
2009 Ethnography: Step-by-step (Vol. 17). Sage Publications.

ADDITIONAL TEXT
Bryman, Alan, ed.
2001 Ethnography (4 Volumes). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.
Gusterson, Hugh. ed.
2008 Ethnographic Research. In A Pluralist Guide to Qualitative Methods in International Relations. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 115-142.
Clifford, James
1983 On Ethnographic Authority. Representations 1, pp. 118-146.
Bourgois, Philippe
1990 Confronting Anthropological Ethics: Ethnographic Lessons from Central America. Journal of Peace Research 27, pp 43-54.
Warren, Kay B. ed.
2001 Telling Truths. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 198-218.
Montejo, Victor D. ed.
2001 Truth, Human Rights, and Representation. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 372-91.

Learning Outcomes Course Content Contact Hour